Planned Outcomes of the Project Zhang Jiutian, ACCA21 2008-10-23     Hubei Hotel, Beijing

Planned Outcomes of the Project Zhang Jiutian, ACCA21 2008-10-23 Hubei Hotel, Beijing PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Planned Outcomes of the Project Zhang Jiutian, ACCA21 2008-10-23 Hubei Hotel, Beijing

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9. The EU is funding a project, 'Support to regulatory activities for CO2 capture and storage' – or STRACO2. It is intended that STRACO2 will support the ongoing development of a comprehensive regulatory framework in the EU for CCS, and is focused more to the longer term rather than towards demonstration. Significantly, it aims to ensure that the developed solutions are applicable to rapidly developing economies outside Europe, and includes cooperation with China within one of its tasks. NZEC will coordinate its work on this task closely with STRACO2. Information will be collated largely from literature available in the public domain. Where it can be updated from information available from within the wider project, this will happen. The study will be UK-led. will attempt to draw together the present position in China with regard to CCS. Views on CCS at the research, technical, enterprise and government levels will be established. This 'position paper' will provide a baseline for the study on stakeholder perceptions. With particular reference to CCS, matters relating to current views and thinking on many topics will be addressed, both at the national, regional and provincial levels. ACCA21 will lead a team to undertake a detailed consultation exercise across government, institutes, industry and the public at large – both at the national and provincial levels. The EU is funding a project, 'Support to regulatory activities for CO2 capture and storage' – or STRACO2. It is intended that STRACO2 will support the ongoing development of a comprehensive regulatory framework in the EU for CCS, and is focused more to the longer term rather than towards demonstration. Significantly, it aims to ensure that the developed solutions are applicable to rapidly developing economies outside Europe, and includes cooperation with China within one of its tasks. NZEC will coordinate its work on this task closely with STRACO2. Information will be collated largely from literature available in the public domain. Where it can be updated from information available from within the wider project, this will happen. The study will be UK-led. will attempt to draw together the present position in China with regard to CCS. Views on CCS at the research, technical, enterprise and government levels will be established. This 'position paper' will provide a baseline for the study on stakeholder perceptions. With particular reference to CCS, matters relating to current views and thinking on many topics will be addressed, both at the national, regional and provincial levels. ACCA21 will lead a team to undertake a detailed consultation exercise across government, institutes, industry and the public at large – both at the national and provincial levels.

10. If CCS technology is to be successfully deployed on a large scale, it is essential to understand its impacts on the broader economy, environment and even the whole society. This is one of the most important concern for China, who has so many people. Because the policy maker must have these information to assess the feasibility of CCS deployment beside the technical issues. If CCS technology is to be successfully deployed on a large scale, it is essential to understand its impacts on the broader economy, environment and even the whole society. This is one of the most important concern for China, who has so many people. Because the policy maker must have these information to assess the feasibility of CCS deployment beside the technical issues.

11. Output and analysis from the 4 main tasks of WP5 and from WPs 2, 3 and 4 will be drawn together. Of primary importance will be the recommendations and needs to progress NZEC to demonstration. Gaps in existing technical knowledge will be identified, ie where further information or further R&D might be required. Information arising from WP2 will set the scene for the future deployment of CCS. It will provide forecasts, eg on the role of coal in the future energy mix in China to 2050. It will consider scenarios for the future and the extent to which CCS might be deployed. Some indication will be provided of indicative costs for different scenarios for CO2 reduction. WP3 will suggest recommendations on capture options that appear attractive for China. A range of options will be recommended, depending on the outcomes of the technoeconomic analyses. Impacts, as they relate to China, of key variables and constraints, eg coal type, water availability and ambient temperatures, on the options recommended will be discussed. Clear recommendations from WP4 will be made arising from the first stage site characterisations in the basins that were addressed. Potential sites for CO2 storage will also be proposed for EOR and ECBM, where there may be additional benefits or the potential to offset costs, and for direct storage of CO2 in saline aquifers. Shorter-term storage opportunities may well involve EOR. For the most promising short and longerterm opportunities, some assessment of the additional information required, and an indication of the type and extent of work needed, will be provided. Recommendations will only be made for sites where the storage capacity is suitable for commercial application. An exception to this may be if a site with limited capacity offers itself as a convenient opportunity for demonstration. Based on an analysis the results, a small number of options for demonstration will be presented. Matching of compatible power generation technologies, capture and storage will be attempted. Options for specific source-storage matching may be identified. Immediate opportunities to address technical areas that would enhance the prospects of a demonstration taking place will be sought. Where specific demonstration opportunities are identified, factors that may need to be addressed regarding the transport of CO2 from source to storage site will be raised. Where non-technical aspects may need to be addressed to enhance or bring forward a demonstration opportunity, they will also be identified. Actions necessary or recommended to facilitate demonstration will be noted. Similarly, current barriers to longer-term deployment will be identified and, where possible, potential solutions will be offered or recommendations made. Output and analysis from the 4 main tasks of WP5 and from WPs 2, 3 and 4 will be drawn together. Of primary importance will be the recommendations and needs to progress NZEC to demonstration. Gaps in existing technical knowledge will be identified, ie where further information or further R&D might be required. Information arising from WP2 will set the scene for the future deployment of CCS. It will provide forecasts, eg on the role of coal in the future energy mix in China to 2050. It will consider scenarios for the future and the extent to which CCS might be deployed. Some indication will be provided of indicative costs for different scenarios for CO2 reduction. WP3 will suggest recommendations on capture options that appear attractive for China. A range of options will be recommended, depending on the outcomes of the technoeconomic analyses. Impacts, as they relate to China, of key variables and constraints, eg coal type, water availability and ambient temperatures, on the options recommended will be discussed. Clear recommendations from WP4 will be made arising from the first stage site characterisations in the basins that were addressed. Potential sites for CO2 storage will also be proposed for EOR and ECBM, where there may be additional benefits or the potential to offset costs, and for direct storage of CO2 in saline aquifers. Shorter-term storage opportunities may well involve EOR. For the most promising short and longerterm opportunities, some assessment of the additional information required, and an indication of the type and extent of work needed, will be provided. Recommendations will only be made for sites where the storage capacity is suitable for commercial application. An exception to this may be if a site with limited capacity offers itself as a convenient opportunity for demonstration. Based on an analysis the results, a small number of options for demonstration will be presented. Matching of compatible power generation technologies, capture and storage will be attempted. Options for specific source-storage matching may be identified. Immediate opportunities to address technical areas that would enhance the prospects of a demonstration taking place will be sought. Where specific demonstration opportunities are identified, factors that may need to be addressed regarding the transport of CO2 from source to storage site will be raised. Where non-technical aspects may need to be addressed to enhance or bring forward a demonstration opportunity, they will also be identified. Actions necessary or recommended to facilitate demonstration will be noted. Similarly, current barriers to longer-term deployment will be identified and, where possible, potential solutions will be offered or recommendations made.

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