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Non-Academic Careers . Asaf Federman Careers Consultant. Today. Career Planning The Job market for PhD holders Making applications Case Studies Will not tell you where to find jobs or what kind of jobs you can do!. But how do I know? . What do I want? Values, motivations ,

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non academic careers

Non-Academic Careers

Asaf Federman

Careers Consultant

today
Today
  • Career Planning
  • The Job market for PhD holders
  • Making applications
  • Case Studies

Will not tell you where to find jobs or what kind of jobs you can do!

but how do i know
But how do I know?
  • What do I want? Values, motivations,
  • What can I do? skills, strengths,
  • What is available? Type of work, lifestyle, employers, roles.
values
Values

How you decide to use your ‘capabilities’ will depend on your values

What motivated you to pursue a PhD?

What do you (dis)like about the environment?

What drives you to continue?

Are there causes of conflict?

“If skills are what you do well, values are what motivate you to succeed”

personality type and preferences

Values

Personality type and preferences
  • Value based motivation questionnaire http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/advantage/start/who
  • MBTI courses at RSSP“MBTI personality awareness” http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/skills/rssp/sessions/gsp139
  • TDI online http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/advantage/start/who
can i do it can i prove it
Can I do it? Can I prove it?

Individual practice.

recruiting researchers survey of employers practice 2009
Recruiting Researchers:Survey of employers’ practice 2009
  • 6% value of doctoral graduates & are actively targeting them
  • 25% show a strong interest in doctoral graduates. They engage and recruit them but their level of engagement is less developed.
  • 47% of respondents have some interest in doctoral but do not seem to be actively targeting them.
  • 22% of respondents have no real interest in doctoral graduates and answered ’no‘ to most questions.

Although most employers (78%) appreciate recruits with a PhD, the majority (69%) do not actively seek them.

how would you expect a phd holder to perform in the following areas
“How would you expect a PhD holder to perform in the following areas?”
  • 1. data analysis
  • 2. problem solving
  • 3. drive and motivation
  • 4. project management
  • 5. interpersonal skills
  • 6. leadership
  • 7. commercial awarenessSource: Vitae (2009), Recruiting Researchers: Survey of Employer Practice
what are we looking for
What are we looking for?

“There is no such thing as a typical Fast Streamer. Successful candidates come from a diverse range of backgrounds, and may have any kind of degree. There are, however, some key competencies that we look for in all our Fast Streamers.

The ability to think flexibly is important. Not everything you do will be headline news. It’s important that you can give as much focus to the smaller details as you do to the big-picture issues.

Sitting on the fence is not an option for a Fast Streamer. You’ll need to be someone who can take the lead on decision-making based on evidence, and handle all the pressure and responsibility that comes with it. This means being proactive and having the ability to think on your feet.

You’ll be working with some of the brightest and most talented people in the country. It’s important that you all get the best out of each other. That’s why the ability to build trust and develop relationships is vital, valuing and respecting each person’s perspective.

The ability to make an impact is also essential. We look for people who are lucid, persuasive, confident and articulate. Whether it’s a high-level meeting, a large presentation or a conversation with a disgruntled customer, you must be able to express yourself and defend your position clearly and succinctly.

Being able to think innovatively and ‘outside the box’ is also important, particularly as you may be asked to consider doing something new, or to investigate how things can be further improved upon to be more efficient and cost-effective.

We want you to get the most out of all the opportunities on offer. That’s why it’s essential that you have a good level of self-awareness and can acknowledge your own personal and professional development needs. You’ll be expected to learn a huge amount during your time on the programme. So it’s important that you recognise where additional support and development might be needed, and that you make the most of all the training we offer.

what are we looking for11
What are we looking for?

“There is no such thing as a typical Fast Streamer. Successful candidates come from a diverse range of backgrounds, and may have any kind of degree. There are, however, some key competencies that we look for in all our Fast Streamers.

The ability to think flexibly is important. Not everything you do will be headline news. It’s important that you can give as much focus to the smaller details as you do to the big-picture issues.

Sitting on the fence is not an option for a Fast Streamer. You’ll need to be someone who can take the lead on decision-making based on evidence, and handle all the pressure and responsibility that comes with it. This means being proactive and having the ability to think on your feet.

You’ll be working with some of the brightest and most talented people in the country. It’s important that you all get the best out of each other. That’s why the ability to build trust and develop relationships is vital, valuing and respecting each person’s perspective.

The ability to make an impact is also essential. We look for people who are lucid, persuasive, confident and articulate. Whether it’s a high-level meeting, a large presentation or a conversation with a disgruntled customer, you must be able to express yourself and defend your position clearly and succinctly.

Being able to think innovatively and ‘outside the box’ is also important, particularly as you may be asked to consider doing something new, or to investigate how things can be further improved upon to be more efficient and cost-effective.

We want you to get the most out of all the opportunities on offer. That’s why it’s essential that you have a good level of self-awareness and can acknowledge your own personal and professional development needs. You’ll be expected to learn a huge amount during your time on the programme. So it’s important that you recognise where additional support and development might be needed, and that you make the most of all the training we offer.

slide12

Skills / Competencies

  • Kent University Careers Website http://www.kent.ac.uk/careers
  • .
  • And now for the PhD job markets…
the interesting bit
The interesting bit

950

870

38%

35%

680

27%

(14%)

case studies
Case Studies:

6% are actively targeting doctoral graduates

25% show a strong interest in doctoral graduates

47% have some interest in doctoral but do not seem to be actively targeting them.

22% have no real interest in doctoral graduates.

British Museum, English Heritage, Publishers, Civil Service Fast Stream, EU Union, Universities.

making applications
Making Applications

Application forms

Cover letters

CVs

Interview

Assessment centre

what does the employer want to know
What does the employer want to know
  • Can you do the job
  • Will you fit in
  • Have you got potential
  • Will you be committed

The application process will test all of these

application forms
Application Forms
  • Describe a recent experience of working with other people. What did you contribute and what was the outcome?
  • Give an example of a situation where you solved a problem in a creative way.
  • Describe how you handled a situation where you had to initiate and complete a task in the face of resistance from others.
  • Look deeper – what is the real question?
  • http://www.kent.ac.uk/careers/compet/skillquest.htm
cover letter
Cover Letter
  • Tailored to the job (order and content)
  • 1 page (academic 1-2 pages)
  • single spaced
  • 12 points Times or similar
structure non academic
Structure (non-academic)
  • Introduce yourself. (‘Dear Mrs. Smith’).
  • What position are you applying for?
  • Why do you want the post?
  • Why that particular organisation?
  • Why you: Illustrate your suitability
  • Extenuate circumstances, if needed
  • Close by reiterating your suitability, thanking them for their time and saying you look forward to hearing from them.
supporting statements fail because
Supporting Statements Fail because:
  • The statement is too generic
  • The statement fails to address the job criteria
  • Insufficient evidence of skills/experience
  • The statement was obviously used for another job
      • It uses negative or inappropriate language
slide23

ACADEMIC

  • Research
  • Publications
  • Teaching
  • Funding
  • 2-4 pages
  • Other experience

NON ACADEMIC

  • Skills/capabilities
  • Commercial awareness
  • Other experience
  • 2 pages
  • Conferences
  • Publications
practical strategies
Practical strategies
  • Make your CV relevant
      • Use the job/person spec as guide
  • Most important info on page 1
  • Use action verbs
  • Emphasise roles, responsibilities &

achievements

action verbs
Action verbs

Delivered Supervised Produced

Managed Analysed Initiated

Introduced Identified Solved

Led Generated Orchestrated

Supported Sold Demonstrated

Established Adapted Presented

Solved Introduced Suggested

cvs for overseas
CVs for Overseas

Write CV according to the conventions of the country:

  • www.prospects.ac.uk/links/countries
  • ‘Going Global’ – http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/careers/hub/databases/
  • Global CVs and Resume Guide, Mary Ann Thompson
case studies27
Case Studies
  • http://icould.com/videos/elizabeth-vokurka/
  • http://icould.com/videos/neil-jennings/
  • http://icould.com/videos/fiona-denney/
further information
Further Information
  • Careers Hub in Learning Grid, University House
  • http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/go/careers/researchers
  • See a Careers Consultant
slide29

Values:

  • Value based motivation questionnaire http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/advantage/start/who

Personality type and preferences:

  • MBTI courses at RSSP“MBTI personality awareness” http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/skills/rssp/sessions/gsp139
  • TDI online http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/advantage/start/who
  • Careers Hub in Learning Grid, University House
  • http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/go/careers/researchers
  • See a Careers Consultant. 024 7657 5508 | [email protected]

In Warwick:

External resources

  • http://vitae.ac.uk/researchers/1270/Careers.html
  • www.researchintensive.com (‘making applications’ links to AGCAS booklet)
  • Beyond the PhD www.beyondthephd.co.uk
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