Documenting information sources avoiding plagiarism key points for writers
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Documenting Information Sources & Avoiding Plagiarism: Key Points for Writers. When you write:. You must tell your readers the sources of your ideas and information.

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When you write l.jpg
When you write:

  • You must tell your readers the sources of your ideas and information.

  • Tell your readers if you have permission to use others’ words or ideas. Don’t presume that permission is unnecessary or implicit.

  • In most cases you are not required to document well-known facts or dictionary definitions. However, when in doubt, you should always document your source of information.


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Plagiarism is using someone else's words or ideas and claiming them as your own, either intentionally or unintentionally.


Actions that might be seen as plagiarism from purdue university online writing lab l.jpg
Actions that might be seen as plagiarism claiming them as your own, either intentionally or unintentionally. (From Purdue University Online Writing Lab):


Strategies for avoiding plagiarism l.jpg
Strategies for Avoiding claiming them as your own, either intentionally or unintentionally. Plagiarism:

  • Put into quotations everything that comes directly from the text.

  • Paraphrase, but be sure you are not just rearranging or replacing a few words.

    Excerpted from: Indiana University, Bloomington, Writing Tutorial Services: http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html


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Strategies, continued: claiming them as your own, either intentionally or unintentionally.

  • Check your paraphrase against the original text to be sure you have not accidentally used the same phrases or words, and that the information is accurate.

  • Each time you directly quote an outside source or restate it in your own words (paraphrasing), identify that source with a citation.

    Bullet 1: Indiana University, Bloomington, Writing Tutorial Services: http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html

    Bullet 2: Steal This Handout... Montana State University Libraries: http://www.lib.montana.edu/instruct/guides/plagiarism.html


An example of paraphrasing l.jpg
An example of paraphrasing: claiming them as your own, either intentionally or unintentionally.

  • Original source: “…the biggest problem we have in public discourse today is, there’s plenty of information out there, but you don’t know what’s true and what’s not, and it’s hard to access it.”

  • Bill Clinton, “Bill Clinton: The Rolling Stone Interview,” interview by Jann S. Wenner, Rolling Stone, (December 28, 2000-January 4, 2001):128


An inappropriate paraphrase l.jpg
An inappropriate paraphrase: claiming them as your own, either intentionally or unintentionally.

  • Today, people have too much information coming at them. It’s hard for them to access information and to tell what’s true and what isn’t.

  • Problems:

    • There is no citation or indication in the text to tell readers the source of the paraphrase.

    • The first sentence of the paraphrase does not accurately represent President Clinton’s statement.

    • The second sentence mirrors the original quote too closely and might be considered plagiarism.


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An appropriate paraphrase with citation: claiming them as your own, either intentionally or unintentionally.

  • President Bill Clinton has said that the public now faces a glut of information that is difficult to navigate, making it hard for one to judge what is true or false.

  • Bill Clinton, “Bill Clinton: The Rolling Stone Interview,” interview by Jann S. Wenner, Rolling Stone, (December 28, 2000-January 4, 2001):128


  • Common style manuals to consult for citation styles l.jpg
    Common style manuals to consult for citation styles: claiming them as your own, either intentionally or unintentionally.

    • Publication manual of the American Psychological Association. Washington, DC: The Association, 2001.

    • Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA style manual and guide to scholarly publishing. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 1998.


    Sources for help l.jpg
    Sources for help: claiming them as your own, either intentionally or unintentionally.

    • UNR’s Writing Center:

      E.J. Cain Hall Room 206

      www.unr.edu/cla/wc

    • Style Manuals (MLA, APA, Turabian & others)

      UNR Main Library Reference Desk


    This guide was created by l.jpg
    This guide was created by: claiming them as your own, either intentionally or unintentionally.

    Patrick RagainsBusiness & Government Information LibrarianMail Stop 322University of Nevada, Renophone: (775) 784-6500, ext. 309email: [email protected]


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