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WC ISSUES & INJURY PREVENTION PRESENTED TO RADISSON PAPER VALLEY HOTEL APPLETON, WI 9/12/08 FITZGERALD CLAYTON JAMES & KASTEN

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WC ISSUES & INJURY PREVENTION PRESENTED TO RADISSON PAPER VALLEY HOTEL APPLETON, WI 9/12/08 FITZGERALD CLAYTON JAMES & KASTEN JEFF THIEL, CPCU – EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT DARREN CHEREK - LOSS PREVENTION CONSULTANT. AGENDA INTRODUCTIONS HOW IS YOUR RATE DETERMINED

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slide1

WC ISSUES & INJURY PREVENTION

PRESENTED TO

RADISSON PAPER

VALLEY HOTEL

APPLETON, WI

9/12/08

FITZGERALD CLAYTON JAMES & KASTEN

JEFF THIEL, CPCU – EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

DARREN CHEREK - LOSS PREVENTION CONSULTANT

slide2

AGENDA

  • INTRODUCTIONS
  • HOW IS YOUR RATE DETERMINED
  • HOW IS YOUR EXPERIENCE MOD DETERMINED
  • INJURY TRENDS
  • SAFETY COMMITTEE
    • IDENTIFYING LOSS TRENDS
      • FLEET
      • MAINTENANCE
      • DRIVER
    • REVIEW LOSS RUNS
    • IDENTIFY REPEATERS
    • CONDUCT INJURY REVIEWS
  • QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
slide3

CREATION OF CODE 7705

  • The following amendments to the Wisconsin Basic Manual have been approved effective October 1, 2007, applicable to new and renewal business:
      • 1. Ambulance and Emergency Medical Services
  • Wisconsin background: Wisconsin currently classifies for-profit ambulance service providers under code 7380 and volunteer ambulance service providers under code 7710. Thus, Wisconsin already is an exception to NCCI’s classification of ambulances under code 7370.
  • Approved action: Adopt code 7705 for paid, for-profit ambulance providers while retaining code 7710 for volunteer ambulance services. The rate for code 7705 will be the same as code 7380 until such time that the class develops sufficient experience to determine its own rate. NCCI’s description of code 7705 will also be adopted with the exception of striking any language indicating that volunteers are to be included under the code. Finally, in time, if the rates for codes 7705 and 7710 do not indicate large differentials, consideration will be given to combining the two ambulance codes, paid for-profit and volunteer, just as NCCI proposes in this filing.

Wisconsin Compensation Rating Bureau

slide4

7705 for paid, for-profit ambulance providers

  • Code 7380
  • 10/1/2008 $5.20
  • 10/1/2007  $5.26
  • 10/1/2006 $6.05
  • 10/1/2005 $6.33
  • 10/1/2004 $6.14
  • 10/1/2003 $6.63
  • 07/1/2002 $6.33
  • Code 7705
  • 10/1/2008 $5.20
  • 10/1/2007 $5.26

Wisconsin Compensation Rating Bureau

slide5

7710 for volunteer ambulance services

  • Code 7710
  • 10/1/2008 $11.15
  • 10/1/2007  $9.13
  • 10/1/2006 $7.47
  • 10/1/2005 $5.86
  • 10/1/2004 $4.69
  • 10/1/2003 $4.16
  • 07/1/2002 $4.02

Description: CIVIL DEFENSE WORKERS AND VOLUNTEER RESCUE SQUADS - INCLUDING MEMBERS SERVING AS AUXILIARY POLICE OFFICERS AT EMERGENCIES (Actual payroll shall be taken, but in no event less than $1,560 per individual per annum in calculating premium.)

Wisconsin Compensation Rating Bureau

slide6

WHAT IS AN EXPERIENCE MODIFICATION FACTOR?

THE EXPERIENCE MOD IS AN INDICATOR OF HOW SAFELY OR UNSAFELY THE BUSINESS HAS OPERATED.

THE STATE OBTAINS INFORMATION ON THE NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS, AND THE COSTS OF THE ACCIDENTS, FOR EACH OCCUPATION, STATEWIDE.

THE STATE THEN CALCULATES WHAT THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS AND THE AVERAGE COST OF THOSE ACCIDENTS FOR EACH OCCUPATION. THIS IS CALLED AN“EXPECTED LOSS RATE”

THESE AVERAGES ARE BASED ON THREE (3) YEARS OF LOSSES.

slide7

EXPERIENCE MODIFICATION EXPLANATION

FITZGERALD CLAYTON JAMES & KASTEN

slide8

WHAT IS AN EXPERIENCE MODIFICATION FACTOR?

THE EXPERIENCE MOD IS AN INDICATOR OF HOW SAFELY OR UNSAFELY THE BUSINESS HAS OPERATED.

THE STATE OBTAINS INFORMATION ON THE NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS, AND THE COSTS OF THE ACCIDENTS, FOR EACH OCCUPATION, STATEWIDE.

THE STATE THEN CALCULATES WHAT THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS AND THE AVERAGE COST OF THOSE ACCIDENTS FOR EACH OCCUPATION. THIS IS CALLED AN“EXPECTED LOSS RATE”

THESE AVERAGES ARE BASED ON THREE (3) YEARS OF LOSSES.

slide9

HOW IS AN EXPERIENCE MODIFICATION FACTOR CALCULATED?

3 YEARS OF LOSSES, 3 YEARS OF PAYROLL INFORMATION ARE USED FROM THE LAST 4 YEARS, EXCLUDING THE MOST RECENT.

EXAMPLE: 10/1/08 - 09 MOD – 4/30 UNIT STAT DATE – CLAIMS SHOULD BE REVIEWED PRIOR TO 4/30 FOR MOST ACCURATE MOD

10/1/07 – 08 10/1/06 – 07 10/1/05 – 06 10/1/04 – 05

PAYROLL PAYROLL PAYROLL PAYROLL

LOSSES LOSSES LOSSES LOSSES

YOUR PAYROLL IS MULTIPLIED BY AN EXPECTED LOSS RATE FACTOR THAT IS DETERMINED BY THE WORKERS’ COMPENSATION BUREAU. THIS DETERMINES THE AMOUNT OF LOSSES EXPECTED FOR THE AMOUNT OF PAYROLL YOU HAVE IN THE CLASS CODES USED BY YOUR BUSINESS.

slide10

HOW IS AN EXPERIENCE MODIFICATION FACTOR CALCULATED?

LOSSES ARE VALUED 18 MONTHS AFTER THE INCEPTION DATE OF THE POLICY, AND YEARLY THEREAFTER FOR A TOTAL OF 3 TIMES. THEREFORE, LOSSES AFFECT THE MOD FOR 3 YEARS.

THE ACTUAL LOSSES ARE COMPARED TO THE EXPECTED LOSSES TO DETERMINE THE EXPERIENCE MOD FACTOR.

IF THE ACTUAL LOSSES ARE HIGHER THAN EXPECTED LOSSES A DEBIT MOD RESULTS.

> 1.00 (COSTS ABOVE EXPECTED)

IF THE ACTUAL LOSSES ARE LOWER THAN EXPECTED A CREDIT MOD RESULTS.

< 1.00 (COSTS BELOW EXPECTED)

slide11

HOW IS AN EXPERIENCE MODIFICATION FACTOR CALCULATED?

LOSSES ARE IN 3 CATEGORIES:

MEDICAL ONLY - NO WAGES WERE PAID BY THE INSURANCE CARRIER. (MEDICAL ONLY CLAIMS GO IN AT 30% OF THEIR VALUE. I.E. A $100 CLAIM WILL ONLY COST YOU $30 ON THE MOD CALCULATION.)

FREQUENCY (INDEMNITY CLAIMS UNDER $5,000) - WAGES WERE PAID TO THE INJURED WORKER BY THE INSURANCE CARRIER.

SEVERITY (INDEMNITY CLAIMS OVER $5,000) - WAGES WERE PAID TO THE INJURED WORKER BY THE INSURANCE CARRIER.

slide16

COST EFFECTS OF MOD

$24,493

SAVINGS

$16,892

SAVINGS

slide18

CLAIM AMOUNT:

$40,641

MOD POINTS:

5.68

COST FOR 3 YEARS ON PREMIUM:

$48,529

INDIRECT COSTS OF A CLAIM

TIME TO INVESTIGATE, REPORT, LOSS IN PRODUCTIVITY, DECREASE IN QUALITY,

PROPERTY DAMAGE, ETC.

4 TO 10 TIMES THE VALUE OF THE CLAIM

$48,529

x

4

=

$194,115

SALES PROFITS VS INDIRECT COSTS

$194,115

/

5%

=

$3,882,298

LOSS / PROFIT MARGIN =

UNINSURABLE

COST

slide19

Where do we go from here?

Lower Payrolls?

Lower Rates?

Lower Losses?

slide21

MANAGER’S ROLE

  • RETURN TO WORK PROGRAM
    • PRE-IDENTIFIED TASKS
    • DO NOT SEND PEOPLE HOME
  • ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION
    • 1ST DAY REPORTING
    • IDENTIFY ROOT CAUSE
    • I.D. CORRECTIVE ACTION
    • ADVERTISE POSITIVE CHANGES TO STAFF
slide22

MANAGER’S ROLE

  • UP HOLD SAFETY POLICIES OF YOUR DEPARTMENT / ORGANIZATION
    • FOLLOW YOUR PROGRESSIVE DISCIPLINARY PROGRAM
  • MAKE SAFETY PART OF EACH EMPLOYEE MEETING
    • FORUM TO DISCUSS CONCERNS
    • SAFETY TOPIC OF THE MONTH
slide23

POINTS TO PONDER

Statistical Data:

Ambulance crashes account for the bulk of EMS workplace mortality. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, EMS workers have an estimated fatality rate of 12.7 per 100,000. For non-EMS workers, the estimated fatality rate is 5.0 per 100,000.

Getting struck by another vehicle at the scene is the second most prevalent event that kills EMS personnel. Isn’t it ironic that those whose primary purpose is to save lives have a risk of work-related death more than twice that of the general population? How can one apply Risk Management Principles to guarantee that all Medical Transportation personnel “Arrive Alive and Do No Harm”?

VITALS A Weekly Safety Newsletter for Medical Transport Professionals

slide24

POINTS TO PONDER

In the May, 2003, issue of JEMS, Les R. Becker, Ph.D., NREMT-P, used two large national databases to show that between 1988 and 1997 there were 305 fatal ambulance crashes, 71 ambulance occupant fatalities and 9,465 injuries. Similar numbers were observed between 1991 and 2000.At the time of the publication of the JEMS article, Dr. Becker had another publication in press which showed a detailed statistical analysis that indicated the following:

The fatality risk for restrained ambulance occupants involved in a crash was nearly four times lower than for unrestrained ambulance occupants.

The risk of suffering an incapacitating injury for restrained ambulance occupants involved in a crash was nearly 6.5 times lower than for unrestrained occupants.

The risk of fatality vs. no injury for rear occupants of an ambulance involved in a crash was more than five times greater than for front-seat occupants.

VITALS A Weekly Safety Newsletter for Medical Transport Professionals

slide25

POINTS TO PONDER

Ambulance occupants traveling non-emergency were nearly 2.7 times more likely to be killed than occupants traveling emergency if involved in a crash.

Ambulance occupants traveling non-emergency were nearly 1.7 times more likely to suffer an incapacitating injury than occupants traveling emergency if involved in a crash.52% of ambulance fatalities occurred among “unrestrained occupants riding in positions other than the front seat” and restrained occupants riding in the back accounted for another 20% of fatalities

VITALS A Weekly Safety Newsletter for Medical Transport Professionals

slide26

POINTS TO PONDER

Key Concepts:

1) Risk Identification

2) Risk Evaluation

3) Prioritize Risk

4) Determine and Implement Controls

5) Evaluate and Revise.

Dr. Becker clearly identified the risk, evaluated it, and showed that the reduction of risk is indeed a priority. Everybody and everything in the vehicle needs to be secured. There has been a recent spate of claims regarding patients who were not “tied down” properly. Remember that even if immobilization is not required for potential spinal or orthopedic injuries, patients must be safely secured at all times. Also, passengers who are not essential for patient care should be avoided. Evaluations which lead to the development of safer ambulance interiors and personal protective equipment specific to in transit needs also provides a scientific basis for the revision of transport standards. It is also estimated that emergency units cause 60,000 “wake effect” crashes annually.

VITALS A Weekly Safety Newsletter for Medical Transport Professionals

slide27

what did you say?

Exposures > 85 dB may cause hearing loss

85 dB

Possible solution – move siren to front grill vs top of ambulance.

NIOSH Sound Meter www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/noise

slide28

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK FOR

AMBULANCE COMPANY PERSONNEL

2006 DATA USA

BY AGE

BLS DAYS AWAY FROM WORK 2006 OSHA REPORTABLE INCIDENTS 4,730 DAYS

slide29

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK FOR

AMBULANCE COMPANY PERSONNEL

2006 DATA USA

BY LENGTH OF SERVICE

BLS DAYS AWAY FROM WORK 2006 OSHA REPORTABLE INCIDENTS 4,730 DAYS

slide30

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK FOR

AMBULANCE COMPANY PERSONNEL

2006 DATA USA

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK (MEDIAN 5) PER BLS

BLS DAYS AWAY FROM WORK 2006 OSHA REPORTABLE INCIDENTS 4,730 DAYS

slide31

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK FOR

AMBULANCE COMPANY PERSONNEL

2006 DATA USA

NATURE OF INJURY

BLS DAYS AWAY FROM WORK 2006 OSHA REPORTABLE INCIDENTS 4,730 DAYS

slide32

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK FOR

AMBULANCE COMPANY PERSONNEL

2006 DATA USA

SOURCE OF INJURY

BLS DAYS AWAY FROM WORK 2006 OSHA REPORTABLE INCIDENTS 4,730 DAYS

slide33

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK FOR

AMBULANCE COMPANY PERSONNEL

2006 DATA USA

EVENT OR EXPOSURE

BLS DAYS AWAY FROM WORK 2006 OSHA REPORTABLE INCIDENTS 4,730 DAYS

slide34

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK FOR

AMBULANCE COMPANY PERSONNEL

2006 DATA USA

DAY OF WEEK

BLS DAYS AWAY FROM WORK 2006 OSHA REPORTABLE INCIDENTS 4,730 DAYS

slide35

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK FOR

AMBULANCE COMPANY PERSONNEL

2006 DATA USA

TIME OF DAY

BLS DAYS AWAY FROM WORK 2006 OSHA REPORTABLE INCIDENTS 4,730 DAYS

slide36

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK FOR

AMBULANCE COMPANY PERSONNEL

2006 DATA USA

HOURS WORKED

BLS DAYS AWAY FROM WORK 2006 OSHA REPORTABLE INCIDENTS 4,730 DAYS

slide37

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK FOR

AMBULANCE COMPANY PERSONNEL

2006 DATA USA

WHAT ALL OF THIS MEANS…..

WHO IS MOST LIKELY TO BE INJURED?

SOMEONE WHO IS 25 TO 34 YEARS OLD AND HAS BEEN WORKING WITH YOU FOR 1 TO 5 YEARS.

WHEN ARE THEY MOST LIKELY TO BE INJURED?

ON A FRIDAY BETWEEN 8:01 AM & 12:00 PM.

WHAT WILL THEY BE DOING?

LIFTING A PERSON IN NEED OF TRANSPORT

WHAT WILL BE THE RESULT?

A STRAINED BACK RESULTING IN 3 – 5 DAYS AWAY FROM WORK.

slide38

DAYS AWAY FROM WORK FOR

AMBULANCE COMPANY PERSONNEL

2006 DATA USA

SOLUTION……

GIVE THESE PEOPLE FRIDAY MORNINGS OFF?

slide39

AMBULANCES AROUND THE WORLD

CANADA

SOURCE: THE INTERNET

slide40

AMBULANCES AROUND THE WORLD

INDIA

SOURCE: THE INTERNET

slide41

AMBULANCES AROUND THE WORLD

RUSSIA

SOURCE: THE INTERNET

slide42

AMBULANCES AROUND THE WORLD

FRANCE

SOURCE: THE INTERNET

slide43

AMBULANCES AROUND THE WORLD

BULGARIA

SOURCE: THE INTERNET

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