a production workflow for situating examples of knowledge in video lectures
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A production workflow for situating examples of knowledge in video lectures. How to secure the reusability of knowledge Harald Kjellin, Gunnar Wettergren Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, University of Stockholm. Three major problems have been encountered: .

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a production workflow for situating examples of knowledge in video lectures

A production workflow for situating examples of knowledge in video lectures

How to secure the reusability of knowledge

Harald Kjellin, Gunnar Wettergren

Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, University of Stockholm

three major problems have been encountered
Three major problems have been encountered:
  • (1) It is difficult to design the presentation of knowledge in order to make it reusable outside the class room
  • (2) Producing quality films is very resource/time consuming
  • (3) The pedagogy in a film must be different than the pedagogy in a lecture room in order to motivate students.
purpose
Purpose
  • To develop a workflow, including a format for mass production, for filmed examples of knowledge allowing for reuse
  • thus making our courses available to students who cannot attend lectures and seminars.
methodology
Methodology
  • Iterations of:
    • Requirement specification
    • Design of workflow
    • Implementation in courses
    • Evaluation and analysis
lessons learned from previous iterations
Lessons learned from previous iterations
  • The students scripts of knowledge tended to be superficial
  • Students were often very creative in ways that were not beneficial for the purpose of the course
  • Students presented descriptions on a high level of abstraction, which made it difficult for other students to follow their line of reasoning.
new requirements this iteration
New requirements – this iteration
  • Enabling individual identification.
  • Continuous active learning.
  • Economically feasible
  • Motivating reusability
  • Restricted creativity
  • Format of recording
steps of new workflow
Steps of new workflow
  • Teachers will divide the course curriculum into a set of theories or topics.
  • Each group develops examples of the theoretical content that is situated as a story or as questions and answers in a debate
  • The groups evaluate and refine their presentations in seminars
  • Finally the examples from each group are filmed in a studio
the empirical studies
The empirical studies
  • First we analyzed 65 students’ opinions of the workflow
  • We then went on to evaluating the technical and pedagogical design of the workflow with three experts
  • Finally we asked students that had not participated in the course to react to films done by other students
summaries of results in relation to requirements
Summaries of results In relation to requirements
  • Enabling individual identification. Most examples were experienced as engaging and entertaining
  • Continuous active learning. A majority of students claimed they had learned very much from participating in the seminars.
  • Economically feasible. This requirement was satisfied
  • Motivating reusability. This requirement was only satisfied in some examples (4 groups out of 10)
  • Restricted creativity. This requirement was not satisfied.
  • Format of recording. Satisfied by three of our ten groups.
conclusions
Conclusions
  • There were strong indications that educational films can be mass produced within tight economical constraints by making the film production a part of the course curriculum.
  • There was only a small minority of students who managed to create reusable and pedagogical dialogues
  • Students must have very tight constraints on what is an acceptable dialogue in the films.
  • Students must be motivated to evaluate each other on a detailed level
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