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ELA Common Core State Standards 6 th -12 th Grade Mason-Lake & Oceana 2-11-2011 Compiled and Presented by Jen Orton. On a scale of 0-5, how familiar are you with the new CCSS?. 0 : What does CCSS stand for anyway? 1 : I’ve heard it mentioned. 2 : I’ve read a little about it online.

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ELA Common Core State Standards6th -12th GradeMason-Lake & Oceana2-11-2011Compiled and Presented by Jen Orton


On a scale of 0 5 how familiar are you with the new ccss
On a scale of 0-5, how familiar are you with the new CCSS?

  • 0: What does CCSS stand for anyway?

  • 1: I’ve heard it mentioned.

  • 2: I’ve read a little about it online.

  • 3: I’ve learned a bit about it at staff meetings.

  • 4: I’ve looked at the CCSS in relation to our current GLCE’s and/or HSCE’s and have noticed similarities and/or differences.

  • 5: I could lead this session.


Outcomes for today
Outcomes for Today

Today’s purpose for examining these Common Core State Standards is simply to start developing an awareness of what they are and to think about how we might best address them with our students


What are you already doing?

What clarification do you need?

What will you add or delete?

What resources do you need?


Jot down classroom connections as they arise
Jot down classroom connections as they arise

  • Reading strategies

  • Writing strategies

  • Grammar connections

  • Students

  • Units

  • Other


Agenda
Agenda

  • Welcome

  • Change, transitions & ritual

  • Introduction of CCSS

    • Highlighted guided reading strategy

  • Teaching, Reading, and Testing

  • Overview of Design and Organization of CCSS

  • Grade Level Partner Work:

    • Slowing down to read the standards

    • Make Curriculum and Classroom Connections

  • Text Complexity

  • Next Steps


Change transition ritual
Change, Transition, Ritual

  • Change = a shift in the external situation

  • Transition = the psychological reorientation

    in response to change

  • Change + Human Beings = Transitions


We need rituals for endings and beginnings
We need rituals for endings and beginnings

What are some rituals you might use in your building?



Ccss introduction
CCSS Introduction

  • Strategy: Guided Highlighted Reading


Guided highlighted reading
Guided Highlighted Reading

The goals for this activity are to prepare for reading a selection, build silent reading fluency, to determine what is important in a paragraph, to make inferences, and to read with a larger context in mind.


Guided highlighted reading1
Guided highlighted reading

Each student has a highlighter pen. The teacher reads the paragraph and directions for highlighting. The teacher reads as rapidly as students can follow. The purpose is to get students to push their eyes rapidly across the text to find the text to be highlighted.


Introduction page 3
Introduction, Page 3

  • Paragraph 1

  • Highlight the phrase that states why these K-12 standards were developed


Paragraph 1
Paragraph 1

The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (“the Standards”) are the culmination of an extended, broad-based effort to fulfill the charge issued by the states to create the next generation of K–12 standards in order to help ensure that all students are college and career ready in literacy no later than the end of high school.


Introduction page 31
Introduction, Page 3

  • Paragraph 3

  • Highlight the rational used to decide upon the inclusion of each specific standard


Paragraph 3
Paragraph 3

As specified by CCSSO and NGA, the Standards are (1) research and evidence based, (2) aligned with college and work expectations, (3) rigorous, and (4) internationally benchmarked. A particular standard was included in the document only when the best available evidence indicated that its mastery was essential for college and career readiness in a twenty-first-century, globally competitive society.The Standards are intended to be a living work: as new andbetter evidence emerges, the Standards will be revised accordingly.


Introduction page 32
Introduction, Page 3

  • Paragraph 4

  • Highlight the subject areas directly addressed in the standards


Paragraph 4
Paragraph 4

The Standards are an extension of a prior initiative led by CCSSO and NGA to develop College and Career Readiness (CCR) standards in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language as well as in mathematics. The CCR Reading, Writing, and Speaking and Listening Standards, released in draft form in September 2009, serve, in revised form, as the backbone for the present document. Grade-specific K–12 standards in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language translate the broad (and, for the earliest grades, seemingly distant) aims of the CCR standards into age- and attainment-appropriate terms.


Introduction page 33
Introduction, Page 3

  • Paragraph 5

  • In the beginning of paragraph 5, underline the subject areas, aside from English Language Arts, that are required to address literacy standards


Paragraph 5
Paragraph 5

The Standards set requirements not only for English language arts (ELA) but also for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Just as students must learn to read, write, speak, listen, and use language effectively in a variety of content areas, so too must the Standards specify the literacy skills and understandings required for college and career readiness in multiple disciplines. Literacy standards for grade 6 and above are predicated on teachers of ELA, history/social studies, science, and technical subjects using their content area expertise to help students meet…


In the middle of paragraph 5, highlight how non-ELA teachers are expected to address literacy standards


Paragraph 51
Paragraph 5 are expected to address literacy standards

Literacy standards for grade 6 and above are predicated on teachers of ELA, history/social studies, science, and technical subjects using their content area expertise to help students meet the particular challenges of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language in their respective fields. It is important to note that the 6–12 literacy standards in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects are not meant to replace content standards in those areas but rather to supplement them.


Introduction page 34
Introduction, Page 3 are expected to address literacy standards

  • Paragraph 6

  • Underline four ways that students who demonstrate an understanding of these standards may apply their learning outside the classroom and the work place.


Paragraph 6
Paragraph 6 are expected to address literacy standards

Students who meet the Standards readily undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works of literature. They habitually perform the critical reading necessaryto pick carefully through the staggering amount of information available today in print and digitally. They actively seek the wide, deep, and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews. They reflexivelydemonstrate the cogent reasoning and use of evidencethat is essential to both private deliberation and responsible citizenship in a democratic republic. In short, Students who meet the Standards develop the skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for any creative and purposeful expression in language.


Introduction page 4
Introduction, Page 4 are expected to address literacy standards

  • CCR and grade-specific standards

  • Underline when students are expected to obtain grade-specific standards


Ccr and grade specific standards
CCR and grade-specific standards are expected to address literacy standards

The CCR standards anchor the document and define general, cross-disciplinary literacy expectations that must be met for students to be prepared to enter college and workforce training programs ready to succeed. The K–12 grade-specific standards defineend-of-year expectations and a cumulative progression designed to enable students to meet college and career readiness expectations no later than the end of high school…


Introduction page 41
Introduction, Page 4 are expected to address literacy standards

  • Research and media skills blended into the Standards as a whole

  • Underline the list of skills (all verbs) that students need for understanding information and ideas


Research and media skills blended into the standards as a whole
Research and media skills blended into the Standards as a whole

To be ready for college, workforce training, and life in a technological society, students need the ability to gather, comprehend, evaluate, synthesize,and report on information and ideas, to conduct original research in order to answer questions or solve problems, and to analyze and create a high volume and extensive range of print and nonprint texts in media forms old and new…


Introduction page 42
Introduction, Page 4 whole

  • Shared responsibility for students’ literacy development

  • Paragraph 1: Underline what the Standards insist about instruction


Shared responsibility for students literacy development
Shared responsibility for students’ literacy development whole

The Standards insist thatinstruction in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language be a shared responsibilitywithin the school.


In small groups please talk about
In small groups please talk about… whole

  • What you’re understanding about the CCSS

  • How the strategy of Guided Highlighted reading may have supported your learning

  • How the strategy of Guided Highlighted reading might support learning for your students (classroom connections)


Now a little quiz
Now, a little quiz… whole

1. Common core state standards…

a. Are internationally benchmarked.

b. Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards.

c. Are based on evidence and research.

d. All of the above


Quiz whole

1. Common core state standards are…

a. Are internationally benchmarked.

b. Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards.

c. Based on evidence and research.

d. All of the above


Quiz whole

2. Michigan…

a. Was the 1st state to formally adopt the final CCSS in ELA and Math.

b. Has been a national leader in the development of rigorous academic standards.

c. Adopted the CCSS in June, 2010.

d. All of the above


Quiz whole

2. Michigan

a. Was the 1st state to formally adopt the final CCSS in ELA and Math.

b. Has been a national leader in the development of rigorous academic standards.

c. Adopted the CCSS in June, 2010.

d. All of the above


Quiz whole

3. Assessments will be aligned to the CCSS in…

a. 2011-12

b. 2012-13

c. 2013-14

d. 2014-15


Quiz whole

3. Assessments will be aligned to the CCSS in…

a. 2011-12

b. 2012-13

c. 2013-14

d. 2014-15


Quiz whole

4. The content areas where the CCSS are defined K-12th are:

a. Math

b. ELA & Math

c. Science & SS

d. ELA


Quiz whole

4. The content areas where the CCSS are defined K-12th are:

a. Math

b. ELA & Math

c. Science & SS

d. ELA


Common Core State Standards Timeline whole

  • 2012-2013

  • 2012 MEAP minimally modified as necessary to reflect the CCSS

  • 2013 MME remains the same

  • State focus will be on student learning

  • 2010-2011

  • Getting to know the CCSS/Alignment work

  • 2010 MEAP/2011 MME remain the same

  • State focus will be on technical assistance

  • 2014-2015

  • FULL implementation: instruction AND assessment based on the CCSS

2014-2015

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

  • 2011-2012

  • Implementation of CCSS in classrooms

  • 2011 MEAP/2012 MME remain the same

  • State focus will be on instruction/PD

  • 2013-2014

  • 2013 MEAP based on the 2012 model

  • 2014 MME remains the same

  • State focus will be on preparing new assessments from SMARTER consortim

www.corestandards.org


Advantages
Advantages whole

  • The CCSS are internationally benchmarked so that all students are prepared to succeed in our global economy and society.

  • The common core state standards may enable participating states to work together to:

    • Make expectations for students clear to parents, teachers, and the general public

    • Encourage the development of textbooks, digital media, and other teaching materials aligned to the standards

    • Develop and implement comprehensive assessment systems to measure student performance against the common core state standards

    • Evaluate policy changes needed to help students and educators meet the standards

41


Ccss do not define
CCSS do NOT define: whole

  • How teachers should teach

  • All that can or should be taught

  • The nature of advanced work beyond the core

  • The interventions needed for students well below grade level

  • The full range of support for English language learners and students with special needs

  • Everything needed to be college and career ready

  • The assessment framework


Why is this important
Why is this important? whole

Currently, every state has its own set of academic standards, meaning public education students in each state are learning to different levels

All students must be prepared to compete with not only their American peers in the next state, but with students from around the world



Reading whole

Reading

Reading

Reading

Reading


Reading

One of the key requirements of the Common Core State Standards for Reading is that all students must be able to comprehend texts of steadily increasing complexity as they progress through school.

By the time they complete the core, students must be able to read and comprehend independently and proficiently the kinds of complex texts commonly found in college and careers.

Reading


What are your thoughts

The first part of this section makes a research-based case for why the complexity of what students read matters. In brief, while reading demands in college, workforce training programs, and life in general have held steady or increased over the last half century, K–12 texts have actually declined in sophistication, and relatively little attention has been paid to students’ ability to read complex texts independently.

These conditions have left a serious gap between many high school seniors’ reading ability and the reading requirements they will face after graduation.

What are your thoughts?


Are these students ready for the act

Can they read complex text for why the complexity of what students read matters. In brief, while reading demands in college, workforce training programs, and life in general have held steady or increased over the last half century, K–12 texts have actually declined in sophistication, and relatively little attention has been paid to students’ ability to read complex texts independently. ?

Are these students ready for the ACT?


What chiefly distinguished the performance of those students who had earned the benchmark score or better from those who hadnot was not their relative ability in making inferences while reading or answering questions related to particular cognitive processes, such as determining main ideas or determining the meaning of words and phrases in context.


Instead, the clearest differentiator was students’ ability to answer questions associated with complex texts.

Students scoring below benchmark performed no better than chance (25 percent correct) on four-option multiple-choice questions pertaining to passages rated as “complex” on a three-point qualitative rubric described in the report.


Performance on complex texts is the clearest differentiator in reading between students who are likely to be ready for college and those who are not.

And this is true for both genders, all racial/ethnic groups, and all annual family income levels.

- ACT Reading Between the Lines



Let s take a practice test
Let’s take a practice test! in your building?

  • Same testing conditions as our 11th graders

    • Full Length ACT Practice Test

    • (Prose, Social Studies, Humanities, or Natural Science)

    • 8 minutes to try it out


Talk to your neighbor
Talk to your neighbor. . . in your building?

  • How did you feel?

  • What strategies did you use while taking the test?

  • What strategies might your students use when faced with complex text?


Timing at a glance
Timing …At a glance in your building?

  • ACT Reading

    • 40 multiple choice questions (4 passages with 10 questions each) = 35 minutes

    • That means less than 9 minutes on each passage (including answering the ten questions)


A bit of brain research
A Bit of Brain Research in your building?

  • The limit of working memory is about seven items of information

    • (depending on complexity)

  • 10-2: Ten minutes of information; two minutes of processing

  • The brain is wired to detect threat

    • (shuts down for 20 minutes)

      Kurt Lewin; Lipton


CCSS in your building?

Design and Organization


Design and organization of ela ccss
Design and Organization of ELA CCSS in your building?

Three main sections

  • K−5 (cross-disciplinary)

  • 6−12 English Language Arts

  • 6−12 Literacy in History/Social Studies,

    Science, and Technical Subjects

    Shared responsibility for students’ literacy development

    Three appendices

  • A: Research and evidence; glossary of key terms

  • B: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasks

  • C: Annotated student writing samples


Http www corestandards org
http://www.corestandards.org in your building?/


Another resource
Another Resource in your building?

  • ELA Crosswalk with GLCEs and HSCEs (Draft)

    • 9-CCR ELA Alignment draft v. 10-13

    • 6-8 ELA CC-GLCE Alignment draft 10-16

      9-CCR ELA Alignment draft v.10-13.doc6-8 ELA CC - GLCE Alignment draft v10-16.doc

      http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,1607,7-140-6530_30334_51042-232021--,00.htm


Design and organization
Design and Organization in your building?

Four strands

Reading (including Reading Foundational Skills)

Writing

Speaking and Listening

Language

An integrated model of literacy

Media requirements blended throughout


Key advances
Key Advances in your building?

Reading

  • Balance of literature and informational texts

  • Text complexity

    Writing

  • Emphasis on argument and informative/explanatory writing

  • Writing about sources

    Speaking and Listening

  • Inclusion of formal and informal talk

    Language

  • Stress on general academic and domain-specific vocabulary


Key advances1
Key Advances in your building?

Standards for reading and writing in history/

social studies, science, and technical subjects

  • Complement rather than replace content standards

    in those subjects

  • Responsibility of teachers in those subjects

    Alignment with college and career readiness

    expectations


Standards: Important but insufficient in your building?

To be effective in improving education and getting all students ready for college, workforce training, and life, the Standards must be partnered with a content-rich curriculum and robust assessments, both aligned to the Standards.


What questions do you have
What questions do you have in your building??`


Break
Break in your building?


Getting started
Getting started in your building?

  • Please get a partner, and tab the following pages

  • Anchor Standards for Reading 35

  • Anchor Standards for Writing 41

  • Anchor Standards for

    Speaking & Listening 48

  • Anchor Standards for Language 51

  • Text Complexity Factors 57


Ela design and organization
ELA Design and Organization in your building?

College and Career Readiness (CCR)

anchor standards

Broad expectations consistent across grades and content areas

Based on evidence

about college and

workforce training

expectations

Range and content


Design and organization1
Design and Organization in your building?

K−12 standards

Grade-specific end-of-year expectations

Developmentally appropriate, cumulative progression of skills and understandings

One-to-one correspondence with CCR standards


Reading the anchor standards
Reading the Anchor Standards in your building?

  • With your partner…

    Read the paragraph on the right hand side of page 35 and mark the text

    + I agree

    ! I’m surprised

    ? I wonder about


Reading standards strategy read and example page 35
Reading Standards in your building?Strategy: Read and Examplepage 35

With your partner…

  • Read standard one silently and simultaneously

  • Partner A gives an example

  • Read standard two silently and simultaneously

  • Partner B gives an example

  • Continue through the ten standards


Reading standards pages 35 38 literature pages 39 40
Reading Standards in your building?pages 35-38: LiteraturePages 39-40

With your partner…

  • Pull out the Reading Anchor Standards (pg.35)so you can refer to them

  • Read anchor standard #1 and then read your grade level standard #1 for Literature (narrative)

  • Read standard #1 for the grade level below and above yours

  • You may want to highlight differences between grade levels

  • Repeat through all ten standards for Literature (narrative)

  • Repeat this process for the ten Reading Standards for Informational Text


Process reading strategy pairs square
Process Reading in your building?Strategy: Pairs Square

  • With your partner identify areas of confusion (may use sticky note)

  • Join another pair

  • Label as Pair 1 and Pair 2

  • Pair 1 shares an area of confusion

  • Pair 2 offers clarity *

  • Repeat

  • *If clarity is not reached, bring this area of confusion back to the whole group discussion


What questions do you have about in your building?

the reading standards?


Anchor standards for writing strategy read and example page 41
Anchor Standards for Writing in your building?Strategy: Read and ExamplePage 41

With your partner…

Read the paragraph on the right hand side of page 41 and mark the text

+ I agree

! I’m surprised

? I wonder about

  • Read standard one silently and simultaneously

  • Partner A gives an example

  • Read standard two silently and simultaneously

  • Partner B gives an example

  • Continue through the ten standards


What are you noticing about the three types of writing
What are you noticing about the three types of writing? in your building?

Argument

Informative/explanatory

Narrative


Reading the grade level standards for writing pages 41 47
Reading the Grade Level Standards for Writing in your building?pages 41-47

With your partner…

  • Pull out the Writing Anchor Standards (page 41)so you can refer to them

  • Read anchor standard #1 and then read your grade level standard #1 for writing

  • Read standard #1 for the grade level below and above yours

  • You may want to highlight differences between grade levels

  • Repeat through all standards for writing


Process the writing standards strategy pairs square
Process the Writing Standards in your building?Strategy: Pairs Square

  • With your partner identify areas of confusion (may use sticky note)

  • Join a different pair

  • Label as Pair 1 and Pair 2

  • Pair 1 shares an area of confusion

  • Pair 2 offers clarity *

  • Repeat

  • *If clarity is not reached, bring this area of confusion back to the whole group discussion



Anchor standards for speaking and listening strategy read and example page 48
Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening in your building?Strategy: Read and Examplepage 48

With your partner…

Read the paragraph on the right hand side of page 22 and mark the text

+ I agree

! I’m surprised

? I wonder about

  • Read standard one silently and simultaneously

  • Partner A gives an example

  • Read standard two silently and simultaneously

  • Partner B gives an example

  • Continue through the standards


Reading the grade level standards for speaking and listening pages 48 50
Reading the Grade Level Standards for in your building?Speaking and Listeningpages 48-50

With your partner…

  • Pull out the Speaking and Listening Anchor Standards (page 48 )so you can refer to them

  • Read anchor standard #1 and then read your grade level standard #1 for speaking and listening

  • Read standard #1 for the grade level below and above yours

  • You may want to highlight differences between grade levels

  • Repeat through all standards for speaking and listening


Process the speaking listening standards strategy pairs square
Process the Speaking & Listening Standards in your building?Strategy: Pairs Square

  • With your partner identify areas of confusion (may use sticky note)

  • Join a different pair

  • Label as Pair 1 and Pair 2

  • Pair 1 shares an area of confusion

  • Pair 2 offers clarity *

  • Repeat

  • *If clarity is not reached, bring this area of confusion back to the whole group discussion



Anchor standards for language strategy read and example pages 51 56
Anchor Standards for Language standards?Strategy: Read and Examplepages 51-56

With your partner…

Read the paragraph on the right hand side of page 51 and mark the text

+ I agree

! I’m surprised

? I wonder about

  • Read standard one silently and simultaneously

  • Partner A gives an example

  • Read standard two silently and simultaneously

  • Partner B gives an example

  • Continue through the standards


Reading the grade level standards for language pages 51 56
Reading the Grade Level Standards for Language standards?pages 51-56

With your partner…

  • Pull out the Anchor Standards for Language (page 25) so you can refer to them

  • Read anchor standard #1 and then read your grade level standard #1 for language

  • Read standard #1 for the grade level below and above yours

  • You may want to highlight differences between grade levels

  • Repeat through all standards for language


Process the language standards strategy pairs square
Process the Language Standards standards?Strategy: Pairs Square

  • With your partner identify areas of confusion (may use sticky note)

  • Join a different pair

  • Label as Pair 1 and Pair 2

  • Pair 1 shares an area of confusion

  • Pair 2 offers clarity *

  • Repeat

  • *If clarity is not reached, bring this area of confusion back to the whole group discussion



Text complexity
Text Complexity standards?

Thanks to Macomb ISD for the Text Complexity Slides


What is complex text
What is complex text? standards?

Page 4


Readers and tasks
Readers and Tasks standards?

  • Students’ ability to read complex text does not always develop in a linear fashion. Although the progression of Reading Standard 10 defines required grade-by-grade growth in students’ ability to read complex text, the development of this ability in individual students is unlikely to occur at an unbroken pace.

  • Students need opportunities to stretch their reading abilities but also to experience the satisfaction and pleasure of easy, fluent reading within them, both of which the Standards allow for.


Text complexity1
Text complexity standards?

  • What does this mean for …

    • Elementary teachers?

    • Middle school teachers?

    • High school teachers?

    • Students?


Remember to use the three appendices
Remember to use the Three Appendices standards?

  • A: Research and evidence; glossary of key terms

  • B: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasks

  • C: Annotated student writing samples


  • Throughout the Year with Building standards?Colleagues…

    • Continue studying the standards:

    • Are there any big ideas that you aren’t currently teaching?

    • Use the Crosswalk documents:

    • Are there new things at your grade level that were previously taught by another teacher? Can you share resources? Are there things that were at your grade level that went to another grade level? Can you share good lessons with others? What about other state groups?

    • Use the Timeline:

    • How will you make the transition with the GLCEs & HSCEs to the CCSS? What might be some ways to implement this?

    • Check in with your RESA & MDE

    • MDE is planning to release transition documents


Common Core State Standards Timeline standards?

  • 2012-2013

  • 2012 MEAP minimally modified as necessary to reflect the CCSS

  • 2013 MME remains the same

  • State focus will be on student learning

  • 2010-2011

  • Getting to know the CCSS/Alignment work

  • 2010 MEAP/2011 MME remain the same

  • State focus will be on technical assistance

  • 2014-2015

  • FULL implementation: instruction AND assessment based on the CCSS

2014-2015

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

  • 2011-2012

  • Implementation of CCSS in classrooms

  • 2011 MEAP/2012 MME remain the same

  • State focus will be on instruction/PD

  • 2013-2014

  • 2013 MEAP based on the 2012 model

  • 2014 MME remains the same

  • State focus will be on preparing new assessments from SMARTER consortim

www.corestandards.org



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