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Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby. THE ROARING TWENTIES. Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby. The 1920s, also called the “ Roaring 20s ” or the “ Jazz Age, ” saw important changes:. The 18 th Amendment, along with the Volstead Act (1920), created Prohibition.

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THE ROARING TWENTIES

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Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

THE ROARING TWENTIES


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

The 1920s, also called the “Roaring 20s” or the “Jazz Age,” saw important changes:

  • The 18th Amendment, along with the Volstead Act (1920), created Prohibition.

  • The 19th Amendment granted women the right to vote.

  • Advancing technology and increasing industrialization created a strong economy.


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

PROHIBITION


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

On January 16, 1919, the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified, prohibiting “the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes...”


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

Bootleggers produced illegal liquor and sold it to bars, clubs, and private citizens. Rumrunners smuggled illegal spirits into the United States. Both practices allowed organized crime to flourish.


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

The Prohibition laws were universally unpopular and widely disregarded. Private citizens made their own “bathtub gin” by mixing cheap grain alcohol with water and flavorings like juniper berry juice.


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

The Twenty-first Amendment was fully ratified on December 5, 1933. It stated, “The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, or possession of the United States for delivery or use there in of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited…”


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

Women were given the right to vote in 1920 with the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

A rising spirit of female Independence was created by the suffragettes’ struggle to gain the right to vote


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

As you read, consider that Daisy Buchanan, Jordan Baker, and Myrtle Wilson received the right to vote only two years before this story takes place.Gender equality between men and women is beginning to become more common.


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

INCREASING INDUSTRIALIZATION AND GROWING WEALTH


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

An increase in industrial output and the growth of middle-class wealth led to a period of high optimism and brought about a new fun-seeking attitude in the United States.


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

Mass production drove down prices and encouraged consumers to spend. A Model-T Ford made in 1908 sold for about $900, but by 1925 because of mass production, the price fell to $280.


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

Consider the impact of technology—the automobile, telephone, electric lights, radio, moving pictures—on events in The Great Gatsby.


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

THE JAZZ AGE


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

The confluence of:

  • The failure of Prohibition


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

  • A rising spirit of independence for women


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

  • Increased wealth brought about by breakthroughs in technology


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

  • The great popularity of jazz music and dance that contributed to a relaxed moral code


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

Were all instrumental in the Jazz Age, a period marked by optimism and the feeling of a never-ending party.


Lead-Ins to Literature: The Great Gatsby

As you read, pay close attention to Nick’s descriptions of Gatsby’s parties.


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