US Military Health System Role in Stability Operations

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Stability Operations DoDD 3000.05. DoD Directive 3000.05 re Security, Stability, Transition, and Reconstruction (SSTR-Stability) Operations:It is DoD policy that: Stability operations are a core US military mission that DoD shall be prepared to conduct and support. They shall be given priority c

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US Military Health System Role in Stability Operations

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1. 1 US Military Health System Role in Stability Operations Excerpt from President George W. Bush’s State of the Union Address, January 2003: “HIV/AIDS is a tragedy for millions of men, women and children, and a threat to stability of entire countries and of regions of our world. Our nations have the ability and, therefore, the duty to confront this grave public health crisis.” Excerpt from President George W. Bush’s State of the Union Address, January 2003: “HIV/AIDS is a tragedy for millions of men, women and children, and a threat to stability of entire countries and of regions of our world. Our nations have the ability and, therefore, the duty to confront this grave public health crisis.”

2. Studies have found that military personnel have a much higher risk of HIV infection than equivalent age/sex groups in the civilian population. Studies have found that military personnel have a much higher risk of HIV infection than equivalent age/sex groups in the civilian population.

3. Studies have found that military personnel have a much higher risk of HIV infection than equivalent age/sex groups in the civilian population. Studies have found that military personnel have a much higher risk of HIV infection than equivalent age/sex groups in the civilian population.

4. Studies have found that military personnel have a much higher risk of HIV infection than equivalent age/sex groups in the civilian population. Studies have found that military personnel have a much higher risk of HIV infection than equivalent age/sex groups in the civilian population.

6. Studies have found that military personnel have a much higher risk of HIV infection than equivalent age/sex groups in the civilian population. Studies have found that military personnel have a much higher risk of HIV infection than equivalent age/sex groups in the civilian population.

9. Combined Support Force (CSF) – 536 Surgeon’s Mission To minimize the effects of wounds, injuries, diseases as well as environmental and occupational hazards brought on by the Tsunami-effected areas of Sri Lanka, Indonesia and Thailand. To facilitate in collaboration with the host nation and other nation(s), USAID/OFDA, the ability of the UN and NGO’s to conduct relief efforts after CSF-536 is deactivated.

11. Asian Tsunami Response DoD Medical Efforts Emergency Relief Supplies Potable water; medical supplies; medicines Command; control; coordination; communication Transport Health Sector Assessments USS Lincoln Disease Surveillance NAMRU/WHO surveillance lab Hospital Ship Mercy

13. Natural Disaster Response - Resources Center for Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine (CDHAM) www.cdham.org Center of Excellence for Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance www.coe-dmha.org

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15. Studies have found that military personnel have a much higher risk of HIV infection than equivalent age/sex groups in the civilian population. Studies have found that military personnel have a much higher risk of HIV infection than equivalent age/sex groups in the civilian population.

18. Pre-Conflict Interagency Humanitarian Planning Team worked with CENTCOM planners to mitigate humanitarian consequences Interfaced with and funded int’l orgs/NGOs Stockpiled relief supplies Established interagency Disaster Assistance Response Team (largest ever) Coordinated with Civil Affairs Established Humanitarian Operations Center Developed detailed plans to continue Oil-For-Food (and Medicine) program Inputted health facilities into ‘no-strike’ database Every year, thousands of highly trained military personnel around the world are lost from the defense forces due to HIV/AIDS. As HIV prevalence rates increase, the readiness of militaries deteriorates, thereby threatening national and regional stability. HIV/AIDS affects many sectors of the populations including potential military recruits and the labor force. HIV/AIDS has an especially high impact on individuals during their most productive and child bearing years. To counter the pandemic, the US DoD has established international HIV/AIDS capabilities in 56 countries around the world need the assistance of the DoD to develop and operate HIV prevention programs. DoD capabilities are recognized by other US Governmental and international HIV organizations as being highly effective in maintaining healthy and fit fighting forces. HIV also remains a risk for U.S. military personnel in CONUS and OCONUS. Every year, thousands of highly trained military personnel around the world are lost from the defense forces due to HIV/AIDS. As HIV prevalence rates increase, the readiness of militaries deteriorates, thereby threatening national and regional stability. HIV/AIDS affects many sectors of the populations including potential military recruits and the labor force. HIV/AIDS has an especially high impact on individuals during their most productive and child bearing years. To counter the pandemic, the US DoD has established international HIV/AIDS capabilities in 56 countries around the world need the assistance of the DoD to develop and operate HIV prevention programs. DoD capabilities are recognized by other US Governmental and international HIV organizations as being highly effective in maintaining healthy and fit fighting forces. HIV also remains a risk for U.S. military personnel in CONUS and OCONUS.

19. Major Combat (Relief) Phase Humanitarian/relief operations began during major combat phase Continuation of Oil-For-Food (and Medicine) Distribution of relief supplies Emergency water, food, health needs Civil-Military operations centers DART (civilians) worked with Civil Affairs teams Preparations for Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance (ORHA – Gen Garner) Two specific efforts contributing to the fight against HIV/AIDS include the DoD HIV/AIDS Prevention Program (DHAPP) and the U.S. Military HIV Research Program (USMHRP). Representatives from ISA African Affairs, SOLIC and Unified Combatant Commanders are members of the DHAPP Board of Directors and help guide policies and direct resources for other Congressionally sponsored programs that support HIV/AIDS prevention efforts, such as Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster and Civic Aid (OHDACA), International Military Education and Training (IMET), and Foreign Military Financing (FMF). Two specific efforts contributing to the fight against HIV/AIDS include the DoD HIV/AIDS Prevention Program (DHAPP) and the U.S. Military HIV Research Program (USMHRP). Representatives from ISA African Affairs, SOLIC and Unified Combatant Commanders are members of the DHAPP Board of Directors and help guide policies and direct resources for other Congressionally sponsored programs that support HIV/AIDS prevention efforts, such as Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster and Civic Aid (OHDACA), International Military Education and Training (IMET), and Foreign Military Financing (FMF).

20. Iraq Ministry of Health – Early Initiatives Strategic Planning – Strategic Vision – Primary care focus Public Health – Disease Surveillance/Immunizations Pharmaceutical reform – National Formulary Logistics reform – Kimadia/Oil-For-Food (and Medicine) Security – Facilities Protection Service (FPS) Medical Support to Iraqi Armed Forces (IAF) - MOU National Contingency Response – mass casualty Communications – phone, computers, internet Inspector General – fraud, waste, abuse Donor Coordination – hundreds of millions$$ Civil-Military Medical Coordination – Guidelines; Surgeon’s meetings; travel/outreach to provinces USG Supplemental - $793M – major projects Roles and responsibilities for international HIV activities within the DoD must be clearly defined. Recommend OASD Health Affairs as single coordinator for implementation, coordination, budgeting, evaluation, and communication of activities in global HIV/AIDS efforts. Roles and responsibilities for international HIV activities within the DoD must be clearly defined. Recommend OASD Health Affairs as single coordinator for implementation, coordination, budgeting, evaluation, and communication of activities in global HIV/AIDS efforts.

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26. DoD: Medical Stability Operations Challenges Improved civil-military education/training for DoD health personnel Increased ‘cultural competence’ Focus on capacity-building Focus on sustainability of efforts Improved coordination among all stakeholders Development of metrics/measures of effectiveness

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