Cornwall Roadshow     19th August 2008

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Regional Resource Team. Three Regional Resource TeamsNorth Team covering North West, Yorkshire and Humberside and North EastMidlands Team covering East and West MidlandsSouthern Team covering East, South East and South West. Southern Team . Helen Keats Head of ServiceDavid Powell Supporting PeopleTracey Brushett HomelessnessTracy Hendren HomelessnessCathy Hadfield - Homelessness.

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Cornwall Roadshow 19th August 2008

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1. Cornwall Roadshow 19th August 2008 Cathy Hadfield Specialist Advisor, Homelessness

2. Regional Resource Team Three Regional Resource Teams North Team – covering North West, Yorkshire and Humberside and North East Midlands Team – covering East and West Midlands Southern Team – covering East, South East and South West Until now, it has been the CLG who has primary responsibility to achieve Housing Strat & Support Directorate priorities – which are housing support, homelessness & adults facing exclusion With implementation of the new local govt performance framework, the responsibility for delivering these priorities falls to the regions via the govt offices. IN order to ensure there are adequate resources and experience at a regional level, the CLG has developed 3 Regional Resource Teams.Until now, it has been the CLG who has primary responsibility to achieve Housing Strat & Support Directorate priorities – which are housing support, homelessness & adults facing exclusion With implementation of the new local govt performance framework, the responsibility for delivering these priorities falls to the regions via the govt offices. IN order to ensure there are adequate resources and experience at a regional level, the CLG has developed 3 Regional Resource Teams.

3. Southern Team Helen Keats – Head of Service David Powell – Supporting People Tracey Brushett – Homelessness Tracy Hendren – Homelessness Cathy Hadfield - Homelessness

4. Regional Resource Team To support and co-ordinate work between the GOs and Communities and Local Government To work with LAs to Deliver the TA target Address rough sleeping Support Places of Change programme Ensure health needs of vulnerable clients are identified and services appropriately commissioned Support overcrowding pathfinders Promote enhanced housing options and links to employment Highlight good practice around worklessness in social housing Ensure homelessness prevention remains a key priority for commissioners and partners Some key objectives re listed below.Some key objectives re listed below.

5. National Picture Cornwall Roadshow 19th August 2008 Tracy Hendren Specialist Advisor, Homelessness

6. Key Themes Looking Forward The Housing and Regeneration Bill (Housing Green Paper); Ensuring social housing acts as a platform for economic and social mobility (Hills review); Regulation of social housing to encourage better management, new supply and tenant empowerment (Cave review); Joining up delivery of housing and regeneration (Homes and Communities Agency); The Housing and Regeneration Bill received Royal Accent 22nd July 2008 – and will help to deliver the Governments pledge to provide More Homes to meet growing demand – 3 million new homes by 2020 Delivering sustainable communities, including suitable/specialist housing to meet all client needs, make new housing greener and give social housing tenant a better deal The Housing and Regeneration Act will be heavily influenced by the Hills review (a better tenure mix and more choice for tenants) and the Cave review (Regulation of social housing to encourage better management, new supply and tenant empowerment) Part 1 of the Bill introduces the Homes and Community Agency – bringing together investment and expertise in Housing and Regeneration. The new agency will have responsibility for land and a budget of billions for affordable housing, including shared ownership. It will bring together the Housing Corp, English Partnerships, the Academy of Sustainable Communities and some delivery functions from CLG Part 2 of the Bill will establish the ‘new social housing regulator ‘ Tenant Services Authority’ – New stronger and wider ranging enforcement powers to tackle poor performance housing providers and high performing housing suppliers will benefit from reduced regulation, giving freedom to continue to improve and innovate. Performance indicators will be published and risk based inspections commissioned. – Government will also seek to extend the new housing regulators powers to cover landlord services provided by the Local Authority in the Community Empowerment, Housing and Economic Regeneration Bill Other operational issues relating to homeless services sought to be addressed within the bill are Local connection for armed forces Security of tenure for Gypsy and Travellers on LA sites Tackling ‘tolerated trespassers’ by applying for a postponed possession order and no longer being able to apply for a suspended possession order (secure tenancies only) The Housing and Regeneration Bill received Royal Accent 22nd July 2008 – and will help to deliver the Governments pledge to provide More Homes to meet growing demand – 3 million new homes by 2020 Delivering sustainable communities, including suitable/specialist housing to meet all client needs, make new housing greener and give social housing tenant a better deal The Housing and Regeneration Act will be heavily influenced by the Hills review (a better tenure mix and more choice for tenants) and the Cave review (Regulation of social housing to encourage better management, new supply and tenant empowerment) Part 1 of the Bill introduces the Homes and Community Agency – bringing together investment and expertise in Housing and Regeneration. The new agency will have responsibility for land and a budget of billions for affordable housing, including shared ownership. It will bring together the Housing Corp, English Partnerships, the Academy of Sustainable Communities and some delivery functions from CLG Part 2 of the Bill will establish the ‘new social housing regulator ‘ Tenant Services Authority’ – New stronger and wider ranging enforcement powers to tackle poor performance housing providers and high performing housing suppliers will benefit from reduced regulation, giving freedom to continue to improve and innovate. Performance indicators will be published and risk based inspections commissioned. – Government will also seek to extend the new housing regulators powers to cover landlord services provided by the Local Authority in the Community Empowerment, Housing and Economic Regeneration Bill Other operational issues relating to homeless services sought to be addressed within the bill are Local connection for armed forces Security of tenure for Gypsy and Travellers on LA sites Tackling ‘tolerated trespassers’ by applying for a postponed possession order and no longer being able to apply for a suspended possession order (secure tenancies only)

7. I think everybody has probably seen this slide before, the 5 year strategy to reduce homelessness, recognises that to half the temporary accommodation 2010 relies tackling the five areas shown on the is graph.I think everybody has probably seen this slide before, the 5 year strategy to reduce homelessness, recognises that to half the temporary accommodation 2010 relies tackling the five areas shown on the is graph.

8. Trends: homelessness and temporary accommodation 79,500 households were living in temporary accommodation in England on 31 December 2007 Down by 11% compared to the same time last year and under 80,000 for the first time since 2001 Homelessness acceptances in England down from around 135,000 in 2003/04 to 73,000 in 2006/07 Homelessness Acceptances Since 2003, homelessness acceptances for England have reduced by over 45% and figures have reached lowest levels since early 1980s. Nationally, a total of 15,240 households were accepted as homeless in December 2007, 12 per cent lower than the same period last year and continuing the overall downward trend since 2003. Within the South West 7,820 households were accepted in 2005/06, 5,260 in 2006/07 which is a 33% reduction and 4,520 in 2007/08 which is a further 14% reduction Temporary Accommodation In March 2005, the Government set a target to reduce the use of temporary accommodation to 50,500 by 2010 from a baseline figure of 101,000 in December 2004. Nationally, 79,500 households were living in temporary accommodation at the end of December 2007, 11 per cent lower than the same period last year and under 80,000 for the first time since 2001. In the South West 6,692 applicants were residing in temporary accommodation in December 2004, as at 31st March 2008 4,180 with a target of 3,335 by 2010. The South West are on target to achieve the required 50% by 2010 – with 17 of the 45 South West LA’s already reaching their 2010 target and some of those continuing to reduce TA by a significant amountHomelessness Acceptances Since 2003, homelessness acceptances for England have reduced by over 45% and figures have reached lowest levels since early 1980s. Nationally, a total of 15,240 households were accepted as homeless in December 2007, 12 per cent lower than the same period last year and continuing the overall downward trend since 2003. Within the South West 7,820 households were accepted in 2005/06, 5,260 in 2006/07 which is a 33% reduction and 4,520 in 2007/08 which is a further 14% reduction Temporary Accommodation In March 2005, the Government set a target to reduce the use of temporary accommodation to 50,500 by 2010 from a baseline figure of 101,000 in December 2004. Nationally, 79,500 households were living in temporary accommodation at the end of December 2007, 11 per cent lower than the same period last year and under 80,000 for the first time since 2001. In the South West 6,692 applicants were residing in temporary accommodation in December 2004, as at 31st March 2008 4,180 with a target of 3,335 by 2010. The South West are on target to achieve the required 50% by 2010 – with 17 of the 45 South West LA’s already reaching their 2010 target and some of those continuing to reduce TA by a significant amount

9. Homelessness prevention: continued focus Local authority Homelessness Strategies - legislative requirement to publish revised strategies this year (if not revision has been done since original strategy in July 2003) Increased investment - to support services such as mediation, rent deposits and home visits: £200m for local authorities and voluntary sector over next 3 years – prevention grant Continued focus on implementing good practice guide and prevention toolkit Debt advice: key relationship between local authorities and Citizens’ Advice Bureaux New National Housing Advice Service – joint working agreements between Shelter and Citizen’s Advice Bureau Bullet point 1: Success in reduced homelessness acceptances largely due as a result of new focus on prevention from July 2003 when LA strategies were put in place. Homelessness Act 2002 requires LA’s to review and publish a revised homelessness strategy every 5 years i.e 2008. Bullet point 2: (Gatekeeping stance) - Homelessness prevention is about encouraging the provision of a wider range of housing options at an early stage to help more people avoid homelessness altogether. Bullet point 2: Successes achieved by Government’s significant investment in services to prevent homelessness and by working closely with local authorities and voluntary sector agencies. In December 2007 we announced funding of £200m over next three years to support LA’s and vol orgs - represents the biggest ever cash injection for homelessness services and Govt’s commitment that homelessness remains a top priority. Other funding streams include pcp, trailblazer, overcrowding, court desk funding. Bullet point 3/4: Whilst Mortgage repossessions only accounted for 4% of homelessness in December 2007, Mortgage repossession claims for Devon and Cornwall as collated by the Ministry of Justice shows a 27% (1,681) rise in Quarter 1 2008 since Quarter 1 2007, this is significantly higher than the National rise of 17% for the same period.  Key to helping borrowers remaining in their homes is early intervention, good money advice and where necessary representation and advice before and during any Court Hearing. In comparison the landlord possession actions issued in the same quarter increased by 14% overall, with some districts reducing the claims (Bodmin, Barnstaple and Penzance) The National increase for the same quarter was only 4%. A Pre-Action Protocol for housing possession claims based on rent arrears came into effect on 2nd October 2006, for Social Landlords and gives clear guidance on what the courts will be expecting landlords and tenants to have done prior to arriving at court. This may explain the National minimal increase in claims and may be something individual LA’s wish to revisit as part of the their prevention advice (www.justice.gov.uk/civil/procrules_fin/contents/protocols/prot_rent.htm) Request a copy of the court submission from the landlord this should determine what work has been done with the tenant as outlined in the pre-eviction protocol) Bullet point 4: CLG is currently surveying English Local authorities, Shelter and CAB on Court Desk activity and outcomes and also to establish what gaps there are.  Of 67 South Eastern Councils surveyed, 51 have replied, reporting 41 Desks covering 45 boroughs. In the North West of 35 boroughs 27 have replied, reporting 20 Court desks covering 25 boroughs. Bullet point 5: NHAS – is a partnership between Citizens Advice and Shelter, to ensure high quality advice on homelessness prevention through the network of participating Citizens Advice Bureaux (CABx) and other voluntary agencies across England. Joint Working Agreement - Over 65 local authorities are ready to sign up to the NHAS JWA. The Joint Working Agreement went out to those authorities at the end of February.Bullet point 1: Success in reduced homelessness acceptances largely due as a result of new focus on prevention from July 2003 when LA strategies were put in place. Homelessness Act 2002 requires LA’s to review and publish a revised homelessness strategy every 5 years i.e 2008. Bullet point 2: (Gatekeeping stance) - Homelessness prevention is about encouraging the provision of a wider range of housing options at an early stage to help more people avoid homelessness altogether. Bullet point 2: Successes achieved by Government’s significant investment in services to prevent homelessness and by working closely with local authorities and voluntary sector agencies. In December 2007 we announced funding of £200m over next three years to support LA’s and vol orgs - represents the biggest ever cash injection for homelessness services and Govt’s commitment that homelessness remains a top priority. Other funding streams include pcp, trailblazer, overcrowding, court desk funding. Bullet point 3/4: Whilst Mortgage repossessions only accounted for 4% of homelessness in December 2007, Mortgage repossession claims for Devon and Cornwall as collated by the Ministry of Justice shows a 27% (1,681) rise in Quarter 1 2008 since Quarter 1 2007, this is significantly higher than the National rise of 17% for the same period.  Key to helping borrowers remaining in their homes is early intervention, good money advice and where necessary representation and advice before and during any Court Hearing. In comparison the landlord possession actions issued in the same quarter increased by 14% overall, with some districts reducing the claims (Bodmin, Barnstaple and Penzance) The National increase for the same quarter was only 4%. A Pre-Action Protocol for housing possession claims based on rent arrears came into effect on 2nd October 2006, for Social Landlords and gives clear guidance on what the courts will be expecting landlords and tenants to have done prior to arriving at court. This may explain the National minimal increase in claims and may be something individual LA’s wish to revisit as part of the their prevention advice (www.justice.gov.uk/civil/procrules_fin/contents/protocols/prot_rent.htm) Request a copy of the court submission from the landlord this should determine what work has been done with the tenant as outlined in the pre-eviction protocol) Bullet point 4: CLG is currently surveying English Local authorities, Shelter and CAB on Court Desk activity and outcomes and also to establish what gaps there are.  Of 67 South Eastern Councils surveyed, 51 have replied, reporting 41 Desks covering 45 boroughs. In the North West of 35 boroughs 27 have replied, reporting 20 Court desks covering 25 boroughs. Bullet point 5: NHAS – is a partnership between Citizens Advice and Shelter, to ensure high quality advice on homelessness prevention through the network of participating Citizens Advice Bureaux (CABx) and other voluntary agencies across England. Joint Working Agreement - Over 65 local authorities are ready to sign up to the NHAS JWA. The Joint Working Agreement went out to those authorities at the end of February.

10. Homelessness prevention: Feedback from local authorities Most effective interventions (local authority survey 2007): Rent Deposit or Rent Bond Schemes Mediation/Counselling Working with existing or prospective landlords to provide other housing solutions Home Visits to discuss options with parents or friends or relatives who may exclude part of their household Local “Homelessness Prevention Fund” Early Advice LA Survey published in June 2007 reported rent deposit, mediation; dialogue with landlords and home visits to discuss housing options; prevention fund and early advice as the top prevention measures. LA Survey published in June 2007 reported rent deposit, mediation; dialogue with landlords and home visits to discuss housing options; prevention fund and early advice as the top prevention measures.

11. Temporary Accommodation - next steps Temporary Accommodation Action Plans Supply and Demand Models 2007 LA Survey – most effective activities to reduce Temporary Accommodation: Increased Prevention Improved RSL nomination arrangements Making use of private sector TA visiting programme to provide options advice Increasing percentage of lettings to homelessness Conversion of own stock TA TA Reduction Plans: As CLG Specialist Advisers we will continue to offer targeted support to those LA’s who need help in delivering their Temporary Accommodation Reduction plans. Plans should include prevention activities ongoing and developed and projected TA reductions quarterly and yearly. Supply and Demand Models: This is a model that many LA's have put together - Crudely, it weighs up all the prevention measures that an LA might have in its toolkit, its allocations policy, and against any new stock that might be coming into play to offset the use of TA. London Borough of Southwark have put together a very comprehensive supply and demand model which I can send electronically to any interested Las to use as a good example model. TA Reduction Plans: As CLG Specialist Advisers we will continue to offer targeted support to those LA’s who need help in delivering their Temporary Accommodation Reduction plans. Plans should include prevention activities ongoing and developed and projected TA reductions quarterly and yearly. Supply and Demand Models: This is a model that many LA's have put together - Crudely, it weighs up all the prevention measures that an LA might have in its toolkit, its allocations policy, and against any new stock that might be coming into play to offset the use of TA. London Borough of Southwark have put together a very comprehensive supply and demand model which I can send electronically to any interested Las to use as a good example model.

12. Rough sleeping Work underway to update the rough sleeping strategy 10 years on Will focus on renewed drive to reduce numbers on the streets, alongside action to improve outcomes for former rough sleepers Updated local authority homelessness strategies: need to include focus on single homeless Bullet point 1: The current timescale is to publish the new strategy later on this year and the two main aims of the strategy are to drive rough sleeping down to as close to zero as possible and to improve opportunities and outcomes for former rough sleepers A discussion paper was produced in April 2008 and your views are encouraged around four specific questions – concerning has the discussion paper identified the right issues, what new actions would have the biggest impact on delivery, what can partners do to contribute to the updated strategy and do you sources of evidence or examples of good practice for the Government to draw on? Again I can send an electronic copy to any interested parties.Bullet point 1: The current timescale is to publish the new strategy later on this year and the two main aims of the strategy are to drive rough sleeping down to as close to zero as possible and to improve opportunities and outcomes for former rough sleepers A discussion paper was produced in April 2008 and your views are encouraged around four specific questions – concerning has the discussion paper identified the right issues, what new actions would have the biggest impact on delivery, what can partners do to contribute to the updated strategy and do you sources of evidence or examples of good practice for the Government to draw on? Again I can send an electronic copy to any interested parties.

13. “Places of Change” Achievements of the HCIP Positive move on doubled Numbers into employment doubled or tripled in some schemes A fall in exclusions or abandonments New standard for the quality of physical environments in homelessness schemesAchievements of the HCIP Positive move on doubled Numbers into employment doubled or tripled in some schemes A fall in exclusions or abandonments New standard for the quality of physical environments in homelessness schemes

14. Tackling youth homelessness Commitment to end, by 2010, the use of bed and breakfast accommodation for 16 and 17 year olds 16 and 17 year olds in B&B fallen by almost half from approx 1,000 in September 2006 to 550 in December 2007 Improved access to homelessness mediation across the country Creation of a national supported lodgings development scheme providing accommodation, advice and mediation services Centres of Excellence created to share good practice – South West - Wilthshire Best practice website launched – www.communities.gov.uk/youthhomelessness Bullet point four – good examples are Merseyside, Heretfordshire, Milton Keynes and West London YMCA We will also be hearing about ‘the young devons supported lodging scheme’ later this morning and Kerrier in conjunction with Cornwall College will be launching their ‘homeless – the young person’s guide’ DVD before lunch. Bullet point four – good examples are Merseyside, Heretfordshire, Milton Keynes and West London YMCA We will also be hearing about ‘the young devons supported lodging scheme’ later this morning and Kerrier in conjunction with Cornwall College will be launching their ‘homeless – the young person’s guide’ DVD before lunch.

15. Related agendas … Tackling overcrowding – new action plan with £15m to support 38 pathfinders Independent review of private rented housing to deliver a better product The Extra Enhanced Housing Options have been confirmed, including linking housing and employment advice Working Neighbourhood Fund £1.5 billion programme working in most deprived areas: important for housing sector to engage Bullet Point 1: A tool kit has been devised as a result of the pilot overcrowding LA’s, funding has been made available to all London LA’s and some larger Cities outside London. Again I can email the toolkit to any interested parties. Bullet Point 2: Yvette Cooper (the then Housing Minister) commissioned an independent review to look at what problems tenants and landlords face and what works well in the sector. This is being headed up by Julie Rugg and David Rhodes from the Centre for Housing Policy at York University and the final report is expected at the end of October Bullet point 3 :Bournemouth was successful with their bid in the extra enhanced options trailblazer programme, and I am sure will be sharing with you their plans for providing an enhanced service to customers around homelessness, worklessness and overcrowding. A further bidding round in currently ongoing for the enhanced trailblazer programme with successful LA’s being announced later on in the year. Bullet point 4: On 30th November 2007 the Working Neighbourhood Fund a joint funding stream from CLG and DWP to tackle worklessness in the most deprived areas was launched- the funding was provided through area based grants and allocated directly to LA’s as a non ringfenced grant over a three year period to support local priorities Bullet Point 1: A tool kit has been devised as a result of the pilot overcrowding LA’s, funding has been made available to all London LA’s and some larger Cities outside London. Again I can email the toolkit to any interested parties. Bullet Point 2: Yvette Cooper (the then Housing Minister) commissioned an independent review to look at what problems tenants and landlords face and what works well in the sector. This is being headed up by Julie Rugg and David Rhodes from the Centre for Housing Policy at York University and the final report is expected at the end of October Bullet point 3 :Bournemouth was successful with their bid in the extra enhanced options trailblazer programme, and I am sure will be sharing with you their plans for providing an enhanced service to customers around homelessness, worklessness and overcrowding. A further bidding round in currently ongoing for the enhanced trailblazer programme with successful LA’s being announced later on in the year. Bullet point 4: On 30th November 2007 the Working Neighbourhood Fund a joint funding stream from CLG and DWP to tackle worklessness in the most deprived areas was launched- the funding was provided through area based grants and allocated directly to LA’s as a non ringfenced grant over a three year period to support local priorities

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