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BAB 12. PASAR INPUT. Topics to be Discussed. Competitive Factor Markets Equilibrium in a Competitive Factor Market Factor Markets with Monopsony Power Factor Markets with Monopoly Power. Competitive Factor Markets. Characteristics 1)Large number of sellers of the factor of production

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Bab 12

BAB 12

PASAR INPUT

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Topics to be discussed

Topics to be Discussed

  • Competitive Factor Markets

  • Equilibrium in a Competitive Factor Market

  • Factor Markets with Monopsony Power

  • Factor Markets with Monopoly Power

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets

Competitive Factor Markets

  • Characteristics

    1)Large number of sellers of the factor of production

    2)Large number of buyers of the factor of production

    3)The buyers and sellers of the factor of production are price takers

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets1

Competitive Factor Markets

  • Demand for a Factor Input When Only One Input Is Variable

    • Demand for factor inputs is a derived demand…

      • derived from factor cost and output demand

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets2

Competitive Factor Markets

Demand for a Factor Input When

Only One Input Is Variable

Assume

  • Two inputs: Capital (K) and Labor (L)

  • Cost of K is r and the cost of labor is w

  • K is fixed and L is variable

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets3

Competitive Factor Markets

Demand for a Factor Input When

Only One Input Is Variable

  • Problem

    • How much labor to hire

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets4

Competitive Factor Markets

Demand for a Factor Input When

Only One Input Is Variable

  • Measuring the Value of a Worker’s Output

    • Marginal Revenue Product of Labor (MRPL)

    • MRPL = (MPL)(MR)

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets5

Competitive Factor Markets

Demand for a Factor Input When

Only One Input Is Variable

  • Assume perfect competition in the product market

    • Then MR = P

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets6

Competitive Factor Markets

Demand for a Factor Input When

Only One Input Is Variable

  • Question

    • What will happen to the value of MRPL when more workers are hired?

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Marginal revenue product

Competitive Output Market (P = MR)

MRPL = MPLxP

Monopolistic

Output Market

(P < MR)

MRPL = MPL x MR

Marginal Revenue Product

Wages

($ per

hour)

Hours of Work

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets7

Competitive Factor Markets

Demand for a Factor Input When

Only One Input Is Variable

  • Choosing the profit-maximizing amount of labor

    • If MRPL > w (the marginal cost of hiring a worker): hire the worker

    • If MRPL < w: hire less labor

    • If MRPL = w: profit maximizing amount of labor

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Hiring by a firm in the labor market with capital fixed

In a competitive labor market, a

firm faces a perfectly elastic supply of labor

and can hire as many workers as it wants at w*.

The profit maximizing firm will

hire L* units of labor at the point

where the marginal revenue product

of labor is equal to the wage rate.

w*

SL

MRPL = DL

L*

Hiring by a Firm in theLabor Market (with Capital Fixed)

Price of

Labor

Why not hire fewer

or more workers than L*.

Quantity of Labor

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets8

Competitive Factor Markets

Demand for a Factor Input When

Only One Input Is Variable

  • If the market supply of labor increased relative to demand (baby boomers or female entry), a surplus of labor would exist and the wage rate would fall.

  • Question

    • How would this impact the quantity demanded for labor?

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


A shift in the supply of labor

S1

w1

w2

S2

MRPL = DL

L1

L2

A Shift in the Supply of Labor

Price of

Labor

Quantity of Labor

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets9

Competitive Factor Markets

  • Comparing Input and Output Markets

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets10

Competitive Factor Markets

  • Comparing Input and Output Markets

    • In both markets, input and output choices occur where MR = MC

      • MR from the sale of the output

      • MC from the purchase of the input

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets11

Competitive Factor Markets

Demand for a Factor Input When

Several Inputs Are Variable

  • Scenario

    • Producing farm equipment with two variable inputs:

      • Labor

      • Assembly-line machinery

    • Assume the wage rate falls

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets12

Competitive Factor Markets

Demand for a Factor Input When

Several Inputs Are Variable

  • Question

    • How will the decrease in the wage rate impact the demand for labor?

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Firm s demand curve for labor with variable capital

When two or more inputs are

variable, a firm’s demand for one input

depends on the marginal revenue

product of both inputs.

When the wage rate is $20, A

represents one point on the firm’s

demand for labor curve.

When the wage rate falls to $15, the

MRP curve shifts, generating a new

point C on the firm’s demand for

labor curve. Thus A and C are

on the demand for labor curve, but

B is not.

A

C

B

DL

MRPL1

MRPL2

Firm’s Demand Curve for Labor(with Variable Capital)

Wages

($ per

hour)

20

15

10

5

0

40

80

120

160

Hours of Work

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets13

Competitive Factor Markets

Industry Demand for Labor

  • Assume that all firms respond to a lower wage

    • All firms would hire more workers.

    • Market supply would increase.

    • The market price will fall.

    • The quantity demanded for labor by the firm will be smaller.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


The industry demand for labor

Horizontal sum if

product price

unchanged

Industry

Demand

Curve

MRPL2

MRPL1

DL1

DL2

120

L1

L2

The Industry Demand for Labor

Firm

Industry

Wage

($ per

hour)

Wage

($ per

hour)

15

15

10

10

5

5

0

50

100

150

0

L0

Labor

(worker-hours)

Labor

(worker-hours)

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


The industry demand for labor1

The Industry Demand for Labor

  • Question

    • How would a change to a non-competitive market impact the derivation of the market demand for labor?

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


The demand for jet fuel

The Demand for Jet Fuel

  • Observations

    • Jet fuel is a factor (input) cost

    • Cost of jet fuel

      • 1971--Jet fuel cost equaled 12.4% of total operating cost

      • 1980--Jet fuel cost equaled 30.0% of total operating cost

      • 1990’s--Jet fuel cost equaled 15.0% of total operating cost

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


The demand for jet fuel1

The Demand for Jet Fuel

  • Observations

    • Airlines responded to higher prices in the 1970’s by reducing the quantity of jet fuel used

    • Ton-miles increased by 29.6% & jet fuel consumed rose by 8.8%

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


The demand for jet fuel2

The Demand for Jet Fuel

  • Observations

    • The demand for jet fuel impacts the airlines and refineries alike

    • The short-run price elasticity of demand for jet-fuel is very inelastic

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Short run price elasticity of demand for jet fuel

Short-run Price Elasticityof Demand for Jet Fuel

American-.06Delta-.15

Continental-.09TWA-.10

Northwest-.07United-.10

AirlineElasticityAirlineElasticity

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


The demand for jet fuel3

The Demand for Jet Fuel

  • Question

    • How would the long-run price elasticity of demand compare to the short-run?

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


The short and long run demand for jet fuel

MRPSR

MRPLR

The Short- and Long-RunDemand for Jet Fuel

Price

Quantity of Jet Fuel

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets14

Competitive Factor Markets

  • The Supply of Inputs to a Firm

    • Determining how much of an input to purchase

      • Assume a perfectly competitive factor market

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


A firm s input supply in a competitive factor market

Observations

1) The firm is a price taker at $10.

2) S = AE = ME = $10

3) ME = MRP @ 50 units

Market Supply

of fabric

S

Supply of

Fabric Facing Firm

Market Demand

for fabric

10

10

ME = AE

MRP

D

Demand

for Fabric

100

50

A Firm’s Input Supply in aCompetitive Factor Market

Price

($ per

yard)

Price

($ per

yard)

Yards of

Fabric (thousands)

Yards of

Fabric (thousands)

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets15

Competitive Factor Markets

  • The Market Supply of Inputs

    • The market supply for physical inputs is upward sloping

      • Examples: jet fuel, fabric, steel

    • The market supply for labor may be upward sloping and backward bending

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets16

Competitive Factor Markets

  • The Supply of Labor

    • The choice to supply labor is based on utility maximization

    • Leisure competes with labor for utility

    • Wage rate measures the price of leisure

    • Higher wage rate causes the price of leisure to increase

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets17

Competitive Factor Markets

  • The Supply of Labor

    • Higher wages encourage workers to substitute work for leisure (i.e. the substitution effect)

    • Higher wages allow the worker to purchase more goods, including leisure which reduces work hours (i.e. the income effect)

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Competitive factor markets18

Competitive Factor Markets

  • The Supply of Labor

    • If the income effect exceeds the substitution effect the supply curve is backward bending

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Backward bending supply of labor

Supply of Labor

Income Effect >

Substitution Effect

Income Effect <

Substitution Effect

Backward-Bending Supply of Labor

Wage

($ per

hour)

Hours of Work per Day

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Substitution and income effects of a wage increase

  • Worker chooses point A:

  • 16 hours leisure, 8 hour work

  • Income = $80

480

w = $20

Suppose wages increase to $20

P

Increase wage to $20 worker chooses:

20 hour leisure, 4 hours work

income = $80

w = $10

C

A

B

Q

12

16

20

Substitution effect

Income effect

Substitution and IncomeEffects of a Wage Increase

Income

($ per

day)

240

0

8

24

Hours of Leisure

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Labor supply for one and two earner households

Labor Supply for One- andTwo-Earner Households

  • Female Percent of Labor Force

    • 1950 -- 29%

    • 1999 -- 60%

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Elasticities of labor supply hours worked

Elasticities of Labor Supply (Hours Worked)

Head’s HoursSpouse’s HoursHead’s Hours

with Respect towith Respect towith Respect to

GroupHead’s WageSpouse’s WageSpouse’s Wage

Unmarried males.026(no children)Unmarried females.106(with children)Unmarried females.011(no children)One-earner family-.078(with children)One-earner family.007(no children)Two-earner family-.002-.086-.004(with children)Two-earner family-.107-.028-.059(no children)

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Equilibrium in a competitive factor market

Equilibrium in aCompetitive Factor Market

  • A competitive factor market is in equilibrium when the price of the input equates the quantity demanded to the quantity supplied.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Labor market equilibrium

SL = AE

SL = AE

vM

wM

B

A

wC

P * MPL

DL = MRPL

DL = MRPL

LC

LM

Labor Market Equilibrium

Wage

Wage

Competitive Output Market

Monopolistic Output Market

Number of Workers

Number of Workers

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Labor market equilibrium1

Equilibrium in a Competitive Output Market

DL(MRPL) = SL

wC = MRPL

MRPL = (P)(MPL)

Markets are efficient

Equilibrium in a Monopolistic Output Market

MR < P

MRP = (MR)(MPL)

Hire LMat wage wM

vM = marginal benefit to consumers

wM = marginal cost to the firm

Labor Market Equilibrium

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Labor market equilibrium2

Equilibrium in a Competitive Output Market

DL(MRPL) = SL

wC = MRPL

MRPL = (P)(MPL)

Markets are efficient

Equilibrium in a Monopolistic Output Market

Profits maximized

Using less than the efficient level of input

Labor Market Equilibrium

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Equilibrium in a competitive factor market1

Equilibrium in aCompetitive Factor Market

  • Economic Rent

    • For a factor market, economic rent is the difference between the payments made to a factor of production and the minimum amount that must be spent to obtain the use of that factor.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Economic rent

SL = AE

A

Total expenditure (wage) paid

is 0w* x AL*

w*

Economic Rent

DL = MRPL

B

Economic rent is ABW*

L*

Economic Rent

The economic rent associated with the

employment of labor is the excess of wages

paid above the minimum amount needed

to hire workers.

Wage

0

Number of Workers

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Economic rent1

Economic Rent

  • Question

    • What would be the economic rent if SLis perfectly elastic or perfectly inelastic?

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Equilibrium in a competitive factor market2

Equilibrium in aCompetitive Factor Market

  • Land: A Perfectly Inelastic Supply

    • With land inelastically supplied, its price is determined entirely by demand, at least in the short run.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Land rent

Supply of Land

s2

Economic

Rent

s1

Economic

Rent

D2

D1

Land Rent

Price

($ per

acre)

Number of Acres

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Pay in the military

Pay in the Military

  • During the Civil War 90% of the armed forces were unskilled workers involved in ground combat.

  • Today, only 16% are unskilled workers involved in ground combat.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Pay in the military1

Pay in the Military

  • Shortages of skilled personnel has occurred? Why?

    • Hint: If there is a shortage, the wage must be below the…?

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


The shortage of skilled military personnel

SL

w*

w0

Shortage

DL = MRPL

The Shortage ofSkilled Military Personnel

Wage

Number of Skilled Workers

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Pay in the military2

Pay in the Military

  • Military pay is based on years of service not MRP.

  • MRP increases and the private sector pay is greater than military pay.

  • Many leave the military.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Pay in the military3

Pay in the Military

  • Solution

    • Selective reenlistment bonuses

    • Base pay on MRP

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Factor markets with monopsony power

Factor Markets with Monopsony Power

  • Assume

    • The output market is perfectly competitive.

    • Input market is pure monopsony.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Marginal and average expenditure

Why is marginal expenditure

greater than SL?

Marginal

Expenditure (ME)

SL = Average

Expenditure (AE)

C

wc

w* = 13

D = MRPL

Lc

L*

Marginal and Average Expenditure

Price

(per unit

of input)

20

15

10

5

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

Units of Input

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Factor markets with monopsony power1

Factor Markets with Monopsony Power

  • Examples of Monopsony Power

    • Government

      • Soldiers

      • Missiles

      • B2 Bombers

    • NASA

      • Astronauts

    • Company town

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Monopsony power in the market for baseball players

Monopsony Power inthe Market for Baseball Players

  • Baseball owners created a monopsonistic cartel

    • Reserve clause prevented competition for players

    • 1975--Free agency after six years

    • 1969--Average salary was $42,000 ($200,000 in 1999 dollars)

    • 1997--Average salary was $1,383,578

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Monopsony power in the market for baseball players1

Monopsony Power inthe Market for Baseball Players

  • Baseball owners created a monopolistic cartel

    • 1975 salaries were 25% of team expenditures

    • 1980 salaries were 40% of team expenditures

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Teenage labor markets and the minimum wage

Teenage Labor Marketsand the Minimum Wage

  • When the minimum wage rose in New Jersey in 1992 from $4.25 to $5.05, a survey conducted found a 13% increase in employment.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Teenage labor markets and the minimum wage1

Teenage Labor Marketsand the Minimum Wage

  • Explanations

    • Reduction in fringe benefits

    • Lower pay for more productive workers

    • Monopsony market

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Teenage labor markets and the minimum wage2

Teenage Labor Marketsand the Minimum Wage

  • Findings

    • None of the explanations are validated by the survey results

    • Indicates of the need for further study

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Factor markets with monopoly power

Factor Markets with Monopoly Power

  • Just as buyers of inputs can have monopsony power, sellers of inputs can have monopoly power.

  • The most important example of monopoly power in factor markets involves labor unions.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Monopoly power of sellers of labor

When a labor union is a monopolist, it

chooses among points on the buyer’s

demand for labor curve.

The seller can maximize the number of workers

hired, at L*, by agreeing that workers will

work at wage w*.

SL

A

w*

DL

MR

L*

Monopoly Power of Sellers of Labor

Wage

per

worker

Number of Workers

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Monopoly power of sellers of labor1

The quantity of labor L1 that maximizes

the rent that employees earn is determined

by the intersection of the marginal revenue

and supply or labor curves; union members

receive a wage rate of w1.

Finally, if the union wishes to maximize total

wages paid to workers, it should allow L2

union members to be employed at a wage

rate of w2 because the marginal revenue

to the union will then be zero.

w1

w2

Economic

Rent

L1

L2

Monopoly Power of Sellers of Labor

Wage

per

worker

SL

A

w*

DL

MR

L*

Number of Workers

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Factor markets with monopoly power1

Factor Markets with Monopoly Power

  • The primary determinant of controlling wage and economic rent is controlling the supply of labor

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Factor markets with monopoly power2

Factor Markets with Monopoly Power

  • A Two-Sector Model of Labor Employment

    • Union monopoly power impacts the nonunionized part of the economy.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Wage determination in unionized and nonunionized sectors

SL

When a monopolistic union

raises the wage rate in the

unionized sector of the

economy from w* to wU,

employment in that

sector falls.

wU

For the total supply of labor to

remain unchanged, the wage in

the nonunionized sector

must fall from w* to wNU..

w*

wNU

DNU

DU

DL

Wage Determination inUnionized and Nonunionized Sectors

Wage

per

worker

Number of Workers

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Factor markets with monopoly power3

Factor Markets with Monopoly Power

  • Bilateral Monopoly

    • Market in which a monopolist sells to a monopsonist.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Bilateral monopoly

ME

SL = AE

19

wC

Wage

Possibilities

DL = MRPL

MR

25

Bilateral Monopoly

Wage

per

worker

25

20

15

10

5

Number

of Workers

10

20

40

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Bilateral monopoly1

Observations

Hiring without union monopoly power

MRP = ME at 20 workers and w = $10/hr

Union’s objective

MR = MC at 25 workers and w = $19/hr

Wage

per

worker

ME

25

SL = (AE)

20

19

wC

15

DL = MRPL

10

MR

5

Number

of Workers

10

20

25

40

Bilateral Monopoly

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Bilateral monopoly2

Bilateral Monopoly

  • Who Will Win?

    • The union will if its threat to strike is credible.

    • The firm will if its threat to hire non-union workers is credible.

    • If both make credible threats the wage will be at wc.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


The decline of private sector unionism

The Decline of Private Sector Unionism

  • Observations

    • Union membership and monopoly power has been declining.

    • Initially, during the 1970’s, union wages relative to nonunion wages fell.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


The decline of private sector unionism1

The Decline of Private Sector Unionism

  • Observations

    • In the 1980’s union wages stabilized relative to non-union wages.

    • In the 1990’s membership has been falling and wage differential has remained stable.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


The decline of private sector unionism2

The Decline of Private Sector Unionism

  • Explanation

    • The unions have been attempting to maximize the individual wage rate instead of total wages paid.

    • The demand for unionized employees has probably become increasingly elastic as firms find it easier to substitute capital for skilled labor.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Wage inequality have computers changed the labor market

Wage Inequality--HaveComputers Changed the Labor Market?

  • 1950 - 1980

    • Relative wage of college graduates to high-school graduates hardly changed

  • 1980-1995

    • The relative wage grew rapidly

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Wage inequality have computers changed the labor market1

Wage Inequality--HaveComputers Changed the Labor Market?

  • In 1984, 25.1% of all workers used computers

  • 1993 -- 46.6%

  • 1999 -- nearly 60%

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Wage inequality have computers changed the labor market2

Wage Inequality--HaveComputers Changed the Labor Market?

  • Percent change in use of computers

    • College degrees

      • 1984 - 1993 -- 42 to 70%

    • Less than high school degree

      • 5 to 10%

    • With high school degree

      • 19 to 35%

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Wage inequality have computers changed the labor market3

Wage Inequality--HaveComputers Changed the Labor Market?

  • Growth in wages -- 1983 - 1994

    • College graduates using computers - 11%

    • Non-computer users -- less than 4%

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Wage inequality have computers changed the labor market4

Wage Inequality--HaveComputers Changed the Labor Market?

  • 1993 - 1997

    • High school dropouts out of school less than 10 years earned 29% less than high school graduates

    • 1963 -- The differential was only 19%

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Wage inequality have computers changed the labor market5

Wage Inequality--HaveComputers Changed the Labor Market?

  • 1993 - 1997

    • Average weekly wage for college graduates (out of school less than 10 years) was 96% higher than high school graduates.

    • College graduation premium has more than doubled.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Summary

Summary

  • In a competitive input market, the demand for an input is given by the MRP, the product of the firm’s marginal revenue, and the marginal product of the input.

  • A firm in a competitive labor market will hire workers to the point at which the marginal revenue product of labor is equal to the wage rate.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Summary1

Summary

  • The market demand for an input is the horizontal sum of the industry demands for the input.

  • When factor markets are competitive, the buyer of an input assumes that its purchase will have no effect on the price of the input.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Summary2

Summary

  • The market supply of a factor such as labor need not be upward sloping.

  • Economic rent is the difference between the payments to factors of production and the minimum payment that would be needed to employ those factors.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Summary3

Summary

  • When a buyer of an input has monopsony power, the marginal expenditure curve lies above the average expenditure curve.

  • When the input seller is a monopolist such as a labor union, the seller chooses the point on the marginal revenue product curve that best suits its objective.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


Summary4

Summary

  • When a monopolistic union bargains with a monopsonistic employer, the wage rate depends on the nature of the bargaining process.

nuhfil hanani : web site : www.nuhfil.com, email : [email protected]


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