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Eco-Industrial Park. Long-term strategy to utilize the Midwest’s post-consumer carpet supply. Necessary Components of a Carpet Eco-Industrial Park. Collection infrastructure Process to densify resin

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Eco industrial park

Eco-Industrial Park

Long-term strategy to utilize the Midwest’s post-consumer carpet supply


Necessary components of a carpet eco industrial park

Necessary Components of a Carpet Eco-Industrial Park

  • Collection infrastructure

  • Process to densify resin

  • Manufacturing facilities that use either post-consumer carpet/fiber or densified resin as feedstock


Collection infrastructure

Collection Infrastructure


Collection infrastructure1

Collection Infrastructure

  • Minnesota disposes 77,000 tons of carpet annually, not including C & D carpet waste.

  • Would collect, identify, sort, and bale (and possibly grind) post-consumer carpet as specified by the manufacturers.

  • Would collect from state vendors, general contractors, C & D contractors, commercial management firms, flooring contractors, etc.

  • Possibly could densify the resin on site.

  • Would sell the baled carpet/fiber or resin to manufacturers (on- and off-site) for processing.


Eco industrial park

Post Consumer Carpet

Carpet is Identified and Sorted by fiber type/backing

Wool,PET

Other

Urethane Backed

Floor Tile

PVC Backed

Floor Tile

Polyolefin

Backed Carpet

Nylon 6,6

Nylon 6

PP

WTE or

Flood Bags

Refurbished

Floor

Tile

Milliken

New Floor

Tile

(Interface

C & A, Shaw)

Deconstruction of Carpet

Depolymerzation

BASF

Waste

Carpet

Needle

Punch

Carpet

Pad

Bales of Face

Fiber Separated from

Backing with Low

Calcium Carbonate

Content

Bales of Whole

Ground Carpet with

Backing High

Calcium

Carbonate Content

Densified

Nylon

Carpet

Backing

Whole Carpet

Extruded into

Construction

Sheeting by

Nylon Board

Manufacturing

Other

Products

Injection

Grade

Resin

Wood

Plastic

Composite

Landfill


Items for consideration

Items for Consideration

  • State vendors

    • Willing to explore collection options and offer a certificate guaranteeing recycling.

    • Willing to alter their de-installation process to fit specifications required by the end-user or collection center.

  • Commercial management firms, C & D contractors and other carpet installers have expressed interest in carpet recycling.

  • DuPont, C & A, Interface, and Milliken have expressed interest in working w/ OEA on a collection issues.


Issues barriers

Issues/Barriers

  • Landfilling of carpet is currently cheaper in the Metro area versus recycling.

  • There is no ban on landfilling carpet.

  • Carpet manufacturers are paying NBM to take post-industrial carpet (i.e. Shaw).

  • Other manufacturers (i.e. Winnebago) are also paying NBM to take material or are giving it to them for free.

  • There is plenty of post-consumer carpet and not many outlets.


Continuation of issues barriers

Continuation of Issues/Barriers

  • NBM is exploiting their position in the marketplace by refusing to pay for material (since they are getting paid to take material or are getting it for free).

  • Certain manufacturers need justification to collect and recycle (i.e. DuPont) post-consumer carpet.


Positive aspects of collecting post consumer carpet

Positive Aspects of Collecting Post-Consumer Carpet

  • Central Collection allows economy of scale.

  • NBM has to use either post-consumer or post-industrial feedstock-virgin resin is too expensive.

  • Collection is a non-issue if there are markets for the material.


Next steps

Next Steps

  • Determine whether NBM is planning on starting up their own collection infrastructure.

  • Conduct discussions with manufacturers to gauge their interest in being part of a central collection system and what their commitment is to an eco-industrial park.

  • Conduct discussions with manufacturers on how a collection center could be designed to fit their needs.

  • Come to agreement with manufacturers that they will take material to the center, rather than to NBM, once center is started.


Continuation of next steps

Continuation of Next Steps

  • Conduct discussions with manufacturers about their goals in producing recycled content resin, recycled content carpet, etc.

  • Require all public agencies to recycle all of their post-consumer carpet by inserting a standard specification in bid packages to general contractors.


Items to be determined

Items to be Determined

  • Will an identification tool be widely available?

  • Which carpet manufacturers will be involved?

  • Which facilities will the post-consumer carpet be sent to for processing?

  • What standards for removal will be required to ensure clean material is brought to the collection center?

  • Costs for collection, handling, and transportation of post-consumer carpet?

  • Grant opportunities (OEA and CARE)?


Timeline collection

Timeline (Collection)

Gauge NBM’s place

in market-

Determine whether

a central

collection system

is feasible

Engage

fiber/carpet

manufacturers &

partners to take

next steps

Get standard

specification

language in

state agency

bids

Provide workplan

outlining next

steps to build a

collection

center/system

Complete

initial

collection

center

Continue

facilitating

partnerships

and expand

system

December

2002

February

2003

March

2003

December

2003

Ongoing


Resin

Resin


Recycled resin

Recycled Resin

  • Could be produced in a manufacturing facility

    • Manufacturer densifies resin in-house from post-consumer carpet fiber-can then be extruded into a composite profile or used as an injection mold grade resin.

  • Could be produced in a vertically integrated collection system

    • The collection center would collect, identify, sort, and densify post-consumer carpet fiber-the recycled resin would then be sold to manufacturers.


Eco industrial park

Post Consumer Carpet

Carpet is Identified and Sorted by fiber type/backing

Wool,PET

Other

Urethane Backed

Floor Tile

PVC Backed

Floor Tile

Polyolefin

Backed Carpet

Nylon 6,6

Nylon 6

PP

WTE or

Flood Bags

Refurbished

Floor

Tile

Milliken

New Floor

Tile

(Interface

C & A, Shaw)

Deconstruction of Carpet

Depolymerzation

BASF

Waste

Carpet

Needle

Punch

Carpet

Pad

Bales of Face

Fiber Separated from

Backing with Low

Calcium Carbonate

Content

Bales of Whole

Ground Carpet with

Backing High

Calcium

Carbonate Content

Densified

Nylon

Carpet

Backing

Whole Carpet

Extruded into

Construction

Sheeting by

Nylon Board

Manufacturing

Other

Products

Injection

Grade

Resin

Wood

Plastic

Composite

Landfill


Recycled resin is a marketable product if

Recycled Resin is a marketable product if:

  • ASTM tested

  • UL tested (electrical)

  • Feedstock is available

  • Cost of recycled resin is comparable or cheaper than virgin resin

  • Board products or other high value product(s) made with recycled resin are successful


Recycled nylon will not be cheaper unless

Recycled nylon will not be CHEAPER unless:

  • Oil prices decrease

  • Engineers take a chance

  • A more efficient system to recycle resin is designed and implemented (i.e. Honeywell)


Current resin producers

Current Resin Producers

  • DuPont

  • Wellman

  • Solutia

  • BASF

  • Honeywell/DSM


Potential outlets for recycled resin

Ford

Toro

Donaldson Corp.

Tier I and Tier II suppliers to the auto industry

Personal Recreational Vehicle Manufacturers (i.e. watercraft, ATV, motorcycles, etc.)

Potential Outlets for Recycled Resin


Issues and barriers in mainstreaming recycled resin

Issues and Barriers in Mainstreaming Recycled Resin

  • Must convince manufacturers to use post-consumer carpet as a feedstock.

  • Currently fiber manufacturers are selling OEM manufacturers and tier I & tier II suppliers virgin nylon for cheap.

  • Cheaper to de-bottleneck a plant to increase capacity than to produce recycled resin.

  • Recycled nylon hinders virgin nylon sales-do not make much profit selling recycled nylon.


Continuation of issues barriers1

Continuation of Issues & Barriers

  • Virgin fiber manufacturers are operating at 50% capacity because of the recession, low oil prices, etc.

  • Recycling process starts with dirty material-costs money to handle it and make it homogenous; cheaper to produce virgin nylon, rather than clean dirty fiber.

    Dirty Fiber Virgin/Clean Product

    Recycled Nylon

Cost to handle

and clean


Next steps1

Next Steps

  • Identify what R & D steps need to be taken to perform ASTM and UL testing of recycled resin.

  • Ask fiber manufacturers to donate their current recycled resin to perform tests (ASTM and UL) funded by CARE.

  • Continue to explore and facilitate partnerships with manufacturers currently using recycled resin or with manufacturers that have the potential to incorporate recycled resin in their product(s) (i.e. Marvin Windows, Ford, etc.).


Timeline resin

Timeline (Resin)

Engage Fiber

Manufacturers &

Partners

to Take Next

Certification Steps

Develop

Workplan and

Apply to CARE

for Grant Funding

Complete

Workplan,

Secure Funding,

and Start

Project

Interim

Report

Complete Initial

Testing

and Modify Plan

If Needed

Complete Testing

and

Market Resin

November

2002

March

2003

July

2003

December

2003

July

2004

December

2004


Composites

Composites


Potential composite manufacturers

Potential Composite Manufacturers

  • Nylon Board Manufacturing

  • Marvin Windows

  • Weyerhauser A.E.R.T


Main incentive for composite manufacturers

Main Incentive for Composite Manufacturers

The product will be able to successfully compete in the marketplace

  • Composites (wood-plastic or wood-nylon) are high performance materials that outlast wood products. Since consumers demand convenience and low-maintenance lifestyles, these composite products will be viable in the marketplace.


Issues and barriers to producing composites with recycled resin

Issues and Barriers to Producing Composites with Recycled Resin

  • Inconsistent supply of resin available.

  • What is the right mix of fiber types?

  • Who will supply the resin?

  • Will manufacturers want to use recycled resin in their composite product?


Next steps to begin composite manufacturing

Next Steps to Begin Composite Manufacturing

  • Identify consistent source of recycled resin

  • Validate recycled resin through ASTM and UL testing

  • Identify a manufacturing partner

  • Product design and validation

  • Marketing of product


Timeline composites

Timeline (Composites)

Engage composite

manufacturers/

partners to take next

R & D Steps

Develop

Workplan and

Findings for

Grant Funding

Complete

Workplan

Funding and Start

Project

First

Interim Report

Complete Initial

Testing

and Modify Plan

as Needed

Second

Interim

Report

Complete

Product Testing

and

Market Product

2002

Dec 31

2002

July

2003

December

2003

July

2004

December

2004


Eco industrial park

Eco-Industrial Layout

  • Sell

  • Baled Carpet

  • Baled Fiber

  • Resin

  • Collection Center

  • Bale Material

  • Grind Material

  • Identify Material

  • Fiber/Resin (possible)

  • Additional

  • Manufacturer

  • Wood/Plastic

  • Composites

  • Extruded Board

  • Pay for:

  • Baled Carpet

  • Baled Fiber

  • Resin

  • Vendors

  • Contractors

  • Manufactures

  • Pay to take

  • Post-consumer

  • & Post-industrial

  • carpet

  • Pay for:

  • Baled Carpet

  • Baled Fiber

  • Resin

Excess

Manufacturing

Capacity

Traded

  • Nylon Board

  • Manufacturing

  • Extruded Board

Goal:Utilize Manufacturing Capacity @ 100%


Why an eco industrial park makes economic sense

Why an Eco-Industrial Park Makes Economic Sense

  • Economies of Scale

  • Lower Production Costs

  • Lower Material Costs

  • Lower Infrastructure Costs

  • Greater Access to Financial Resources


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