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Strategies for Providing Mentoring and Social Supports to Students with Repeated Behavior Challenges. Training Purpose.

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Training purpose

Strategies for Providing Mentoring and Social Supports toStudents with Repeated Behavior Challenges


Training purpose

Training Purpose

The purpose of this training is to prepare personnel mentoring a student who is receiving supports because of repeated behavior issues with the knowledge, skills, and strategies necessary for a positive mentoring experience


Training module overview

Training Module Overview

Module 1: Mentor Responsibilities

Module 2: Forming Relationships

Module 3: Building Meaningful

Discussions

Module 4: Understanding Basic Behavior

Patterns


Mentor training module 1 mentor responsibilities

Mentor TrainingModule 1Mentor Responsibilities


Mentor training module 1 mentor responsibilities1

Mentor Training Module 1:Mentor Responsibilities

  • Module Purpose

    • The purpose of this module is to provide an explicit overview of your role and responsibilities as a mentor


Mentor training module 1 mentor responsibilities2

Mentor Training Module 1: Mentor Responsibilities

  • Mentees are students who:

    • Need access to supportive, encouraging, positive adults

    • Have begun to demonstrate a pattern of conduct problems

  • Mentoring is one part of a support plan that is using combinations of strategies to help the mentee make positive choices and get on a positive path


Mentor training module 1 mentor responsibilities3

Mentor Training Module 1: Mentor Responsibilities

  • Questions to think about:

    • What draws you being a mentor?

    • What do you expect the mentoring experience will be like?

    • What do you hope to get out of being a mentor?


Mentor training module 1 mentor responsibilities4

The role of a mentor is to:

Listen

Encourage

Cheerlead

Support

Respect the student’s choices

Advocate

Be helpful

It’s not the mentor’s job to “fix” the student; solve their problems; or “fix” what is wrong in the student’s life

Mentor Training Module 1: Mentor Responsibilities


Mentor training module 1 mentor responsibilities5

Mentor Training Module 1: Mentor Responsibilities

  • Take responsibility for establishing a regular meeting schedule

  • Help mentees to practice and reflect on newly learned social skills or other intervention strategies

  • Maintain the student’s confidentiality

  • Participate in progress monitoring

  • Contribute to the oversight of the mentoring program


Mentor training module 1 mentor responsibilities6

Mentor Training Module 1: Mentor Responsibilities

  • Take responsibility for establishing a regular meeting schedule (scheduling is the mentor’s job, not the student)

    • Establish a predictable 30-60 minute weekly meeting schedule

    • Be consistent and reliable

    • Keep your word

    • Show up on time

    • Periodically check-in on the student outside of the meeting schedule (“Just stopped by to say hello….”)


Mentor training module 1 mentor responsibilities7

Mentor Training Module 1: Mentor Responsibilities

Help mentees to practice and reflect on newly learned social skills or other intervention strategies (e.g., self monitoring)

Be familiar with the student’s Student Support Plan

Model skills

Help student to reflect on how they are doing

Provide support and encouragement

Identify where the student needs more assistance


Mentor training module 1 mentor responsibilities8

Mentor Training Module 1: Mentor Responsibilities

Maintain the student’s confidentiality

Don’t share personal information

Meetings are private

Mandatory reporting is legally required if there is any indication that this student:

Will harm him/herself

Is being abused (e.g. emotional, physical or sexual)

Will harm someone else


Mentor training module 1 mentor responsibilities9

Mentor Training Module 1: Mentor Responsibilities

Participate in progress monitoring

Seek out help when a problem comes up

Communicate problems with the mentor relationship

Provide updates when requested

Attend meetings when invited

Complete feedback tools


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Mentor Training Module 1: Mentor Responsibilities

Contribute to the oversight of the mentoring program

Complete feedback tools

Attend trainings or program design meetings


Mentor training module 1 mentor responsibilities11

Mentor Training Module 1: Mentor Responsibilities

  • Questions to think about:

    • To what extent are the responsibilities described consistent with your expectations of being mentor?

    • How confident/comfortable are you with the expectations described?


Mentor training module 2 forming relationships

Mentor TrainingModule 2Forming Relationships


Mentor training module 2 forming relationships1

Mentor Training Module 2:Forming Relationships

  • Module Purpose

    • The purpose of this module is to provide some suggestions and strategies to help you develop rapport and relationship with your mentee


Mentor training module 2 forming relationships2

Mentor Training Module 2: Forming Relationships

  • The heart of mentoring and subsequently it’s success is the relationship that is formed between you and your mentee. Research suggests:

    • Strong positive relationships with adults is one factor that contributes to a child’s development of resiliency

    • Connectedness with even 1 adult in school, is a deterrent to making poor social and behavioral choices


Mentor training module 2 forming relationships3

Mentor Training Module 2: Forming Relationships

  • Take the time to get to know each other

  • Find things you have in common – opinions, activities, music, movies, etc.

  • Build shared experiences - do things together (even if it is within school such as having lunch)

  • Show and tell your mentee that he is important to you


Mentor training module 2 forming relationships4

Mentor Training Module 2: Forming Relationships

  • Examples of relationship building activities:

    • Share pictures or examples of personal hobbies/interests

    • My favorites are…./I can’t stand….

      • Timed activity to list as many things that are your favorites/things you can’t stand – then review with other to find some common ground


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Mentor Training Module 2: Forming Relationships

The Basics of Communication

Effective communication is the foundation for any productive relationship

Consider these tips for being a good communicative partner


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Mentor Training Module 2: Forming Relationships

The Basics of Communication

Listen with your body: make eye contact, sit still, face the student

Sit in a helping posture -- Sit up in your chair with your legs crossed or together or stand up with your feet about a shoulder's width apart in a relaxed stance. Slouching, resting your head on your hands, shifting positions, etc. signals boredom, fatigue or restlessness.


Mentor training module 2 forming relationships7

Mentor Training Module 2: Forming Relationships

  • The Basics of Communication

    • Use Neutral Signals: Brief verbal or nonverbal responses that show the speaker that you are following the conversation: "I see. Go on.“

    • Paraphrase and Summarize: summarize what the student is saying to capture their emotions and concerns concisely: "If I understand you, you feel Jim was purposely making you look foolish and your first reaction was to get angry."


Mentor training module 2 forming relationships8

Mentor Training Module 2: Forming Relationships

The Basics of Communication

Acknowledge the student’s perspective: let the student know understand their perspective– even if you don’t agree with it. It’s ok to let the student know you have a different opinion as long as you respect the mentee’s perspective

Listen with your intuition: pay attention to underlying feelings and values in the student’s tone of voice, facial expressions, body language and in the content of what's being said


Mentor training module 2 forming relationships9

Mentor Training Module 2: Forming Relationships

  • Doing These May Undermine Your Mentoring Relationship

    • Inconsistently meeting with the mentee

    • Focusing the relationship on trying to change the mentee’s behavior

    • Arguing or constantly opposing the other person's point of view

    • Interrupting your mentee

    • Talking more than you listen

    • Telling long-winded stories


Mentor training module 2 forming relationships10

Mentor Training Module 2: Forming Relationships

Doing These May Undermine Your Mentoring Relationship

Passing judgment on your mentees actions or choices

Demanding your mentee behave a certain way

Imposing personal values or beliefs on your mentee

Giving advice instead of working together to find alternatives

Not recognizing your mentee’s right to her own opinions


Mentor training module 2 forming relationships11

Mentor Training Module 2: Forming Relationships

Doing These May Undermine Your Mentoring Relationship

Having the last word

Showing annoyance

Using “hot” kid jargon to appear “cool”

Jumping to conclusions

Pressuring your mentee to disclose personal information

Abusing confidentiality

Blaming (the mentee or others)


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussions

Mentor TrainingModule 3Building Meaningful Discussions


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion

Mentor Training Module 3:Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Module Purpose

    • The purpose of this module is to provide mentors with the knowledge, skills, and strategies needed to

      • (a) be an effective listener

      • (b) facilitate meaningful discussions with mentees

      • (c) handle potentially difficult conversations that might come up


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion1

Mentor Training Module 3:Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Basic Principles of Giving Feedback

    • Mentors are often giving their mentee feedback on various situations

    • Giving feedback constructively will increase the likelihood that the mentee will use the information and can help to build the mentor-mentee relationship

    • The following are strategies to make feedback giving effective


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion2

Mentor Training Module 3:Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Basic Principles of Giving Feedback

  • Ask permission or identify that you are giving feedback. Examples:

    • “I’d like to give you some feedback on how you handled the situation. Is that OK?”

  • Describe what you observed and be specific. State facts, not opinions, interpretations, or judgments

  • Use the first person: “I think”, “I saw”, “I noticed”


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion3

Mentor Training Module 3:Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Basic Principles of Giving Feedback

  • When making suggestions for improvement, use statements like “you may want to consider…”

  • Feedback should address what a person did, not your interpretation of his or her motivation or reason for it. Example that includes interpretation:

    • “You didn’t use the count to 10 strategy. I know you want to finish because it’s almost lunch time, but…”


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion4

Mentor Training Module 3:Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Basic Principles of Giving Feedback

  • Use the “feedback sandwich” approach

    • Start with a positive observation (“it was good that you…”)

    • Constructive critical observation or suggestion about how to improve

    • Second positive observation, summary statement

  • Avoid using judgmental labels (e.g., “lazy” or “careless”)

  • Avoid terms that exaggerate (e.g., “you always” or “you never”)


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion5

Mentor Training Module 3:Building Meaningful Discussion

Suggestions for Framing Discussions

Be sensitive to your mentee’s circumstances and life as a kid

Learn to “read” your mentee

Disposition, facial expressions, cooperativeness

Provide lots of encouragement

Express your opinion but respect your mentee’s right to make her own choices, even when you disagree with those choices.

Take responsibility for your own feelings and actions before you project them onto others.


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion6

Mentor Training Module 3:Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Suggestions for Framing Discussions

    • Use questions that opens the door for follow up (i.e., avoid questions with 1 word answers):

      • Tell me about something that stood out for you this week?

      • Tell me how you decided to handle……?

    • Listen for unspoken conversation (i.e., things the student is implying without actually saying)

    • Use probing questions to expand the conversation; follow up on something said; looking for places to ask a follow up


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussions1

Mentor Training Module 3: Building Meaningful Discussions

  • Suggestions for Framing Discussions

    • The Famous Person Connection

      • How do you think “so and so” would handle this situation?

      • Use current examples in the media of popular figures to frame a conversation and prompt reflection

    • Ask questions that prompt reflection

      • “How’s that working for you?”


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion7

Mentor Training Module 3:Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Suggestions for Framing Discussions

    • Respect your mentee’s privacy: avoid asking questions about sensitive information about your mentee. e.g.,

      • “Are you sexually active?”

      • “Are you using drugs?”

      • “Do you like Mr. Smith?”


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion8

Mentor Training Module 3: Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Identify Your Personal Disclosure Boundaries

    • Often a mentor will need to grapple with finding a comfortable boundary between sharing personal information and keeping aspects of your life private

      • Give thought to what personal information you are/are not comfortable sharing a mentee

    • Be clear ahead of time of where your comfort level boundary exists so that you are prepared to answer difficult questions in a genuine manner


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion9

Mentor Training Module 3: Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Responding to Sticky Questions

    • Sometimes, students will ask “sticky” questions or questions that make us a squirm a bit while figuring out what to say

    • Handling these types of situations is important – you need to find the balance between redirecting the student and not shutting the student down


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion10

Mentor Training Module 3: Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Responding to Sticky Questions

    • Take a minute and talk about what questions a student might ask you or has asked you in the past that would make/made you feel uncomfortable

    • If you have a situation you can recall, how did you handle it?


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion11

Mentor Training Module 3: Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Responding to Sticky Questions

    • Answering sticky questions genuinely

      • “I’m glad you feel comfortable enough to ask me this question, but some information people prefer to keep to themselves. This is a good lesson, if someone asks you something your not comfortable answering you should say so.”

      • “How would knowing the answer to that help you to make a decision?”

      • “I would rather focus how we can work to a solution that will be good for you.”


Mentor training module 3 building meaningful discussion12

Mentor Training Module 3: Building Meaningful Discussion

  • Responding to sticky questions

    • Avoid answering sticky questions with responses such as:

      • “That’s none of your business”

      • “It’s inappropriate for you to ask me that question”

    • You don’t want to inhibit the student from asking questions in the future


Mentor training module 4 understanding behavior patterns

Mentor TrainingModule 4Understanding Behavior Patterns


Mentor training module 4 understanding behavior patterns1

Mentor Training Module 4Understanding Behavior Patterns

  • Module Purpose

    • The purpose of this module is to familiarize mentors with the basic principles of behavior patterns to help you understand:

      • (a) the reasons why your mentee engages in problem behavior

      • (b) why the various interventions, including mentoring, were selected for your mentee’s Student Support Plan


Training purpose

46


A simple but common example

A Simple But Common Example

  • Context: The student has academic difficulty (e.g., problems with reading)

  • Trigger: The student is given a challenging assignment (e.g., completing math word problems independently)

  • What Happens: Student engages in off task, refusal, or disruptive behavior

  • The Result Is: Teacher addresses student in some way (e.g., redirects, gives help, sends to office)


What does the student learn

What Does the Student Learn?

When I am frustrated,

I act out.

When I act out,

Someone comes and helps me

OR

When I act out,

I’m sent out of the room and avoid the work


Understanding behavior patterns

Understanding Behavior Patterns

Why do students act out?

What does it get them?

What does it get them out of?

Why is that some students act out and others don’t?

What makes a student resilient?

What places a student at risk of failure?


Understanding behavior patterns1

Understanding Behavior Patterns

“Problem behavior” (e.g., being disruptive) is only ONE part of a larger pattern that is happening

To really help students, we have to understand the whole pattern


Training purpose

SETTING EVENTS

Reinforcement History with People or Settings

Academic History

Medical-Physiological Issues

Relationships & Social Support with Adults

Social & Cultural Influences

Peer Networks

Structure & Organization of the Environment


Function of behavior

Function of Behavior


Understanding behavior patterns2

Understanding Behavior Patterns

Key Lessons About Behavior

Behavior – whether positive or negative nets us a payoff…

The more a behavior provides us with a desired outcome, the more likely we are to emit that behavior again in the future

Behavior is logically connected to the environment in which the student is functioning


Understanding behavior patterns3

Understanding Behavior Patterns

Most behaviors serve one of two functions:

To get something (obtain)

Such as: attention, objects, sensory regulation

To get out/ away from something (escape)

Such as: tasks, embarrassment, people

Once we understand the function….we can come up with interventions

55


Think of it this way problem behavior is a symptom

Think of it this way:Problem Behavior is a Symptom

Negative Life Experiences

Social failure

Academic failure

Poor self esteem

Loss of control

Limited opportunities

Extensive critique and very little social praise

Function Behavior Serves:

Protection

Compensation

Defense

Power and control

The “behavior”

meets a need


Training purpose

Using an authoritative interaction style

‘You’re not the boss of me!’

Frustrated with school

It’s too hard for her

Self doubting – She lacks confidence

Scattered & Disorganized

Often Unprepared for Class

Very Self Conscious about what others think of her


Understanding behavior patterns4

Understanding Behavior Patterns

  • Basically, Abigail engages in problem behavior because it results in

    • Escaping out of work (even if this means getting a reduced grade on the assignment) and

    • Adult / peer attention (even if this is not always positive attention)


Understanding behavior patterns5

Understanding Behavior Patterns

To what extend does looking at the behavior this way:

Give you a clear picture of what is happening with this student?

Help you relate to the student’s issues?

Suggest a direction for possible interventions?

59


Understanding behavior patterns6

Understanding Behavior Patterns

When we have a student engaging in problem behavior we have to ask ourselves – “Why is the behavior necessary? What is it that the student needs to resolve the issue?”

Stronger social network?

Skills to handle situations that triggers behavior?

Improve concept of self and future?

Improve academic achievement and sense of competence?


Understanding behavior patterns7

Understanding Behavior Patterns

  • So really, intervention planningis addressing the students needs on two levels:

    • The underlying issues that seem to be causing the behavior in the first place AND

    • The specific variables that are in play when a behavior incident occurs

  • Let’s take a look at what Abigail needs and how that translates into strategies….


Understanding behavior patterns8

Understanding Behavior Patterns

Abigail needs supports that…

builds relationships with adults and provides adults with strategies to respond to positive and unwanted behaviors;

teaches her skills to recognize and handle difficult situations in socially appropriate ways;

helps her develop a positive self- concept and confidence; and

helps her develop a sense of academic competence and provides supports for productive participation in academic activities.


Training purpose

Setting Event Interventions:

How will we address the underlying reasons why behavior is occurring?


Intervention selection bottom line

Intervention Selection: Bottom Line

Select interventions that:

Pass the function test

Use what you already know works

Address each facet of the behavior pattern

Match everyone’s (student and staff) comfort level

Are easy and efficient to use

Address the underlying reasons why behavior is occurring………

64


Mentor training module 4 understanding behavior patterns2

Mentor Training Module 4:Understanding Behavior Patterns

  • Scenario to Think About

    • The program coordinator comes to you and says “Abigail had an incident in Mrs. Little’s class today.” We really need to you to talk to her and find out what is going on.

    • Consider the questions on the next slide


Mentor training module 4 understanding behavior patterns3

Mentor Training Module 4:Understanding Behavior Patterns

  • Scenario to Think About

    • How would you start off the discussion with Abigail to get her to open up about what happened so that she raises the issue for discussion?

    • Once the discussion is started when and how would you ask Abigail for permission to share what you’ve learned with the program coordinator?

    • Once the conversation is started, what kinds of questions would you ask Abigail – given your knowledge about the patterns of behavior?


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