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Equitable Publications. 2008 Summer Conference Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 2008 Summer Conference Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Civil Rights Laws. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

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Equitable publications

Equitable Publications

2008 Summer Conference

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

2008 Summer Conference

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma


Civil rights laws

Civil Rights Laws

  • Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

  • Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972

  • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990


It s the right thing to do

It’s the right thing to do!


Gender bias

Gender Bias

  • Gender Bias does not take into consideration the abilities or competencies of an individual. It merely assumes that one gender is superior to the other.

  • Teaching strategy must be based strictly on the individuals needs of the student rather than on the gender of the student.

  • Gender Bias does not take into consideration the abilities or competencies of an individual. It merely assumes that one gender is superior to the other.

  • Teaching strategy must be based strictly on the individuals needs of the student rather than on the gender of the student.


Equity strategies

Equity Strategies

  • Reference to masculinity or femininity is eliminated unless it pertains to only on gender.

    • Ex: The girls basketball game will begin at 7:00 p.m.


Equity strategies continued

Equity Strategies Continued

  • In both narrative and illustrations, males and females are represented as equal—capable of performing the same duties in a cooperative manner.


Equity strategies continued1

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Occupational titles refer to the latest Dictionary of Occupational Titles, using generic rather than masculine forms.

  • Age should not determine type of occupation anymore than gender.

  • Attention is not brought unnecessarily to the gender of an individual.


Equity strategies continued2

Equity Strategies Continued


Equity strategies continued3

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Generic words are used whenever possible

    • Ex: Artisan RATHER THAN craftsman OR manufactured RATHER THAN manmade.


Equity strategies continued4

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Males or females are depicted in occupations currently dominated by the opposite gender. Ex: Circuit Board Assembly


Equity strategies continued5

Equity Strategies Continued

  • When gender neutral references cannot be made he/she, female/male, or men/women are used alternately to avoid bias.

  • Text references are consistent.

    • Ex: Both men and women now perform construction tasks. They can be proud of the work they perform. INSTEAD OF both men and women now perform construction tasks. The worker can be proud of his work.


Equity strategies continued6

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Second person is used whenever appropriate to eliminate using masculine terms as generic pronouns.

  • Parallel structure is used in reference totitles used in text.

    • Ex: Mr. Smith and Ms. Jones

      RATHER THAN Mr. Smith and Evelyn


Equity strategies continued7

Equity Strategies Continued

  • When names must be used, alternate listing of man’s name with woman’s name or list alphabetically.

  • Demeaning comments referring to one sex are eliminated.

    • Ex: His secretaries report for work at 8:00. RATHER THAN His girls report for work at 8:00 or Oilfield workers put in long hours. RATHER THAN The boys in the field put in long hours.


Equity strategies continued8

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Reference to gender is balanced rather than token.

    • Ex: Showing several males and several females at an executive board meeting RATHER THAN only one woman at a board table surrounded by females.


Equity strategies continued9

Equity Strategies Continued


Equity strategies continued10

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Males and females are both portrayed in leadership roles.


Equity strategies continued11

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Future occupations opportunities are shown to be equal for both males and females.


Equity strategies continued12

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Tables, graphs, appendices, heading, illustrations, and titles show gender balance rather than tokenism.

    • Ex: Representative numbers of males and females are shown throughout the food service curriculum RATHER THAN one picture of a male preparing a desert while all other pictures/drawings in the book are female.


Equity strategies continued13

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Demeaning comments referring to one sex are eliminated.

    • Ex: His secretaries report for work at 8:00 RATHER THAN His girls report for work at 8:00 OR Oil filed workers put in long hours. RATHER THAN boys in the field put in long hours.


Equity strategies continued14

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Stereotyping of males or females is eliminated.


Equity strategies continued15

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Titles of instructional materials show no reference to gender.

    • Ex: Time savers for Household management INSTEAD OF Time Savers for Housewives.


Equity strategies continued16

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Activities are developed which are appropriate for participation of all students which depict both sexes performing the tasks.


Equity strategies continued17

Equity Strategies Continued


Equity strategies continued18

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Nonverbal communications in video presentation is gender balanced.

    • Ex: Facial expressions, posture, gestures, mannerisms, physical interaction, voice tone, dress, and appearance do not show stereotypical male/female characteristics.


Equity strategies continued19

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Instructional objective address “the student” rather than “he” or “she.”

  • Scripts for audio-visual materials are neutral as to the gender rather than referring mainly to one specific sex.

  • Written materials and visuals show men an women in a variety of roles that reflect the many interest of both.


Equity strategies continued20

Equity Strategies Continued

  • Audio materials use both male and female narrators.

  • References supplemental materials are authored by women as well as men.

  • Evaluation allow students to demonstrate competence in a variety of ways.


Strategies for physically challenged

Strategies for Physically Challenged

  • Illustrations include disabled individuals employed in a variety of occupations.


Strategies for physically challenged1

Strategies for Physically Challenged

  • References to physical appearance are eliminated except as they relate to instructions for personal hygiene or safety, which may need to be given at specific time.

  • Older people should not be shown as physically and mentally impaired.


Strategies for physically challenged2

Strategies for Physically Challenged

  • Evaluation allow students to demonstrate competence in a variety of ways.

    • Ex: Tests evaluate skill performance as well as cognitive knowledge and may be completed in groups RATHER THAN being entirely in a written form done on an individual basis.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Culturally diverse groups are always portrayed in a positive manner and with respect of the cultures.

  • Social setting demonstrate full integration of various races and cultures and depict the value and characteristics of the different races and culture.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion1

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion2

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • A variety of instructional styles is included to match learning preferences of various cultures.

    • Ex. Activities are completed through discussion, demonstration, or group interaction RATHER THAN always through lecture or individual effort.

  • References to values, feelings, attitudes, behaviors, and assumptions are eliminated whenever possible.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion3

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Social setting demonstrate full integration of various races and cultures and depict the value and characteristics of the different races and cultures.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion4

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Persons of all races and cultures are shown as being employed in all types of occupations.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion5

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Appropriate language is used to prevent reference or offense to any race or culture.

  • Prejudice is not present in any narrative or artwork.

  • Reference to geographic location, socioeconomic class, cross-cultural symbols, interpersonal style, personality, or community style are minimized and never used when it could be offensive to any.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion6

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Use of historical information, literature, stories, music, folklore, or legends pertaining to any one race or culture is well researched to ensure accurate use and acceptance by that race of culture.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion7

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Materials are free of any graphics or narrative that would be offensive to any minority.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion8

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Terminology referring to any race or culture are not presented in a manner conflicting with other cultural values.

  • When reference to values is necessary, traditional values are not presented in a manner conflicting with other cultural values.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion9

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Reference to home environment, adult influences, family loyalty, and holidays and traditions is made positively, if at all.

  • Materials are prepared in such a way as to be adaptable for languages and values of various races and cultures, as well as diverse learning styles.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion10

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Nonverbal communication in video presentations is racially/culturally balanced (including numbers and variety of minorities, facial expressions, posture, gestures, mannerisms, physical interaction and personal space, voice tone, dress, appearance, and sensitivity.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion11

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Instructional materials contain no reference to persons showing prejudice toward or against other races or cultures in any manner.

  • Evaluation allows students to demonstrate competence in a variety of ways.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion12

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Photograph and artwork depict all races and cultures performing comparable professional and social roles.


Strategies for racial cultural inclusion13

Strategies for Racial/Cultural Inclusion

  • Illustrations encompass accurate physical images, life styles, traditions, and surrounding of various races and culture rather than merely showing skin color.


Odcte org

ODCTE.ORG

  • Go to the Guidance Division web page to find a copy of the power point.

  • [email protected]


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