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CITI HSRWorking Group Meeting . May 21, 2009 CITI Developer Group Meeting Key West, Florida. CITI Program Growth. Budget and Financial . Organizational members 1114 participants as of 5-15-09; 151 VA sites 35 that have a reduced subscription rate. Added 159 new organizations in 2008

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slide1

CITI HSRWorking Group Meeting

May 21, 2009

CITI Developer Group Meeting

Key West, Florida

budget and financial
Budget and Financial
  • Organizational members
    • 1114 participants as of 5-15-09;
    • 151 VA sites
    • 35 that have a reduced subscription rate.
    • Added 159 new organizations in 2008
    • Added 46 new organizations in the first 4 months of 2009.
budget and financial1
Budget and Financial
  • Subscription Fees
    • All new subscriptions $1,500 since October 2008 .
    • All subscription renewals will be $1,500, June 1, 2009.
    • New institution subscription fee - $1,750 in Fall 2009.
  • Grants and contracts
    • US DoN - 51 sites;
    • Fogarty / NIH – 6 sites
budget and financial2
Budget and Financial
  • 2010 Budget
    • Submitted CITI operating budget to UM comptroller’s office 5-15-09.
  • 2009 close out June 1, 2009.
  • Small surplus for 2009.
  • Detailed 2010 Program budget will be submitted to the EAC for review and approval later this summer.
    • New Project Ideas.
monthly site usage
Monthly Site Usage

x1000 / Month

2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

cumulative site usage
Cumulative site usage

2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

slide9

Cumulative Course Site Usage

  • Ver 1&2 19,853 10-00 to 2-02
  • Ver 3 15,026 3-1-02 to 8-14-02
  • Ver 4 28,992 9-1-02 to 7-15-03
  • Ver 5 45,537 7-21-03 to 5-1-04
  • Ver 6 75,000 5-1-04 to 3-1-05 (citiprogram.org)
  • Total 189,408
citi course usage 2009
CITI Course Usage 2009***

***1-1-09 to 4-30-09

citi worldwide footprint
CITI Worldwide Footprint

PABI

World wide n > 1100

International n = 48sites / 35 countries

top 5 rcr course users
Top 5 RCR Course Users

**** 1-1-09 to 4-30-09

navigation through the citi course was easy and intuitive
Navigation through the CITI Course was easy and intuitive.

10% 81%

N=51192

Strongly disagree Strongly agree.

errors
Errors

RCR Course Learner Feedback

  • HTML UTF-8 Character-set errors
    •  ; €™; ’, “, ”; „¢; “; –;
  • Few complaints about the content.
    • Spelling, typos, grammar.
  • Complaints about the quizzes.
  • Too long
    • Intro, text and cases.
    • Institutionally driven.
slide28

RCR Course Criticisms

  • HTML UTF-8 Character-set errors
    •  ; €™; ’, “, ”; „¢; “; –;
  • Few complaints about the content.
    • Minor spelling, typos, grammar.
  • Complaints about the quizzes.
    • Poor Quality
    • Too many questions
    • Errors
    • Typos
  • Content Too long
    • Intro, text and cases.
    • Institutionally driven.
  • Real Video
course length
Course Length
  • 7 topic areas
  • Median time in the course site is 4hrs.
  • On average 3 logins.
  • Public access course
    • Intro
    • Text
    • Video case
    • Embedded cases (2-3)
    • References and links
    • Quizzes
programming focus 2008 2009
Programming Focus 2008-2009
  • Completed Projects
    • A more feature-rich enrollment question option added that incorporates branched logic.- can reduce number of enrollment Q’s seen by learners and allows much more sophisticated course customization by learner.
    • Added standard “remote gateway” mechanism to allow learners to come into CITI directly from local networks- provides absolute personnel records match with downloaded training datasets
    • Completed conversion to more sophisticated quiz question management- multiple subsets of quiz Q’s can be ordered, randomized as needed.
    • Restructured entire CITI website and database fields for compatibility with int’l character sets (unicode), and cleaned up corrupted international course text. [99% complete]
programming focus 2008 20091
Programming Focus 2008-2009
  • Complete Projects
    • Flexibility of automated training dataset dumps increased to add value to institutions.[complete]
    • More sophisticated institutional cloning tools added to reduce new institution setup time by CITI staff [complete]
  • Ongoing Projects
    • Transition from SQL 2000 to SQL 2005 database platform to increase site speed and reduce timeouts June 2009 target
    • Improve database backup strategy to prevent more than 1 hour of lost CITI records in case of catastrophic server failures (note: redundant database servers already in place to reduce failure risk). June 2009 target
programming focus 2008 20092
Programming Focus 2008-2009
  • Ongoing Projects
    • Transfer CITI site to 2 new UM database and 4 new UM web servers to increase site speed, add capacity, and reduce/eliminate timeouts July 2009
    • Add more flexibility in allowing CITI staff to give learners credit for work done at other institutions July 2009 target
    • Reduce complexity of grade book and learner group logic to speed up learner login and reduce server load July 2009 target
    • Incorporate better account security, including a security question and hashed (hidden) password storage for accounts August 2009 target
programming focus 2008 20093
Programming Focus 2008-2009
  • New Projects in Progress
    • Added new admin level (“superadmin”) to provide enhanced control of multiple international institutions by non-CITI staff . [first draft complete, tweaking under way]
    • All web pages tweaked to reduce database calls and improve site speed [initial work complete, additional work ongoing]
    • Created account merge tool for combining multiple learner accounts [initial work complete, tweaks ongoing]
programming focus 2008 20094
Programming Focus 2008-2009
  • Improve database backup strategy to prevent more than 1 hour of lost CITI records in case of catastrophic server failures (note: redundant database servers already in place to reduce failure risk). June 2009 target
programming focus 2009 2010
Programming Focus 2009 - 2010
  • Begin coding for next version of CITI,
    • Cold Fusion platform rather than active server pages,
    • New features
      • More sophisticated translation/authoring tools for international authors
      • Better course image and text management
      • Improved CITI developer tools for reviewing courses and quiz questions.
      • Enhanced site speed, increased concurrent learner capacity.
      • Greater site customization opportunities for individual institutions.
      • Enhanced institutional administrator learner management tools.
    • Many requested feature enhancements are being tracked by Marcos for incorporation into new version Start date October 2009; completion in 2010-2011
research surveys

Research Surveys

“Mentoring Experiences”

And

“Who Wants To Be a Human Subject”

citi rcr for engineers

CITI RCR for Engineers

Jason Borenstein Ph.D.

GA Tech University

crucial choices use of interactive case studies to enhance research ethics education

Crucial Choices: Use of Interactive Case Studies to Enhance Research Ethics Education.

David Perlman Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, U. Penn

President and Founder,

E4-Eclipse Ethics Education Enterprises. LLC

citi rcr where are we headed
CITI RCR, Where Are We Headed?
  • New Courses
  • New Modules
  • New Presentation Models
  • The Course Site as a Research Tool
new rcr initiatives
New RCR Initiatives
  • Sharon Shriver Ph.D. Ed. Specialist Penn State University
    • RCR in the Humanities and the Arts
  • Holly Phernetton, St. Louis University
    • Adelphia Quiz Question Project
  • Ben Fontes, Biosafety Officer, Yale University
    • Biosafety and Biosecurity Course
  • Paul Braunschweiger Ph.D., University of Miami.
    • RCR and Research Administrators.
responsible conduct of resesearch and research administrators
RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESESEARCH and RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS
  • Produced by Stephen Erickson and Karen Muskavitch at BC.
  • Materials were produced in part with support from ORI.
  • Modules, cases and quiz questions
    • Conflict of Interest
    • Financial Management
    • Mentor-Trainee Responsibilities
    • Collaborative Research
    • Data Management
slide48

Group Discussion

Moving the CITI RCR Program Forward. New Directions and New Initiatives.

plagiarism exercise

Plagiarism Exercise

Plant Pathology Plagiarism Module

Lisa Kohl and Heather Olson

NCSU – OpenSeminar

http://openseminar.org/ethics/modules/31/index/screen.do

Professor Charlotte Bronson, Plant Pathology, Iowa State University

http://www.bioethics.iastate.edu/classroom/plagiarism.html

slide53

Benson, D.M., and Grand, L.F. 2000. Incidence of Phytophthora root rot of Fraser fir in North Carolina and sensitivity of Phytophthora cinnamomi to metalaxyl. Plant Dis. 84:661-664.

Yes, The student has copied almost word-for-word from the paper and has not cited the source. This gives the false impression that the words were written solely by the student.

“Nursery transplants are a potential source of Phytophthora spp. introduction to the field; therefore, disease management practices that suppress Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used in transplant production. All isolates of P. cinnamomi recovered from Fraser fir were sensitive to metalaxyl. Although this fungicide remains a useful management tool, growers should use this fungicide only at labeled rates and recommended frequencies to ensure that the fungus remains sensitive to the compound.”

Student Version 1: Disease management practices that reduce Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used in the production of transplants. Question: Is this plagiarism?

slide54

Yes, Although the student has cited the authors of the paper this time, the wording is still almost identical to the words of Benson and Grand. Again, this wrongly makes the reader think that the words are written by the student instead of by the researchers.

Benson, D.M., and Grand, L.F. 2000. Incidence of Phytophthora root rot of Fraser fir in North Carolina and sensitivity of Phytophthora cinnamomi to metalaxyl. Plant Dis. 84:661-664.

“Nursery transplants are a potential source of Phytophthora spp. introduction to the field; therefore, disease management practices that suppress Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used in transplant production. All isolates of P. cinnamomi recovered from Fraser fir were sensitive to metalaxyl. Although this fungicide remains a useful management tool, growers should use this fungicide only at labeled rates and recommended frequencies to ensure that the fungus remains sensitive to the compound.”

Student Version 2: Disease management practices that reduce Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used in the production of transplants (Benson and Grand, 2000). Question: Is this plagiarism?

slide55

Benson, D.M., and Grand, L.F. 2000. Incidence of Phytophthora root rot of Fraser fir in North Carolina and sensitivity of Phytophthora cinnamomi to metalaxyl. Plant Dis. 84:661-664.

No, This is not plagiarism. However, in this example the authors’ words have been incorrectly quoted. It is very important to quote the authors’ words exactly as they appear in the paper, so you do not give the reader an inaccurate version of what the original authors wrote.

“Nursery transplants are a potential source of Phytophthora spp. introduction to the field; therefore, disease management practices that suppress Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used in transplant production. All isolates of P. cinnamomi recovered from Fraser fir were sensitive to metalaxyl. Although this fungicide remains a useful management tool, growers should use this fungicide only at labeled rates and recommended frequencies to ensure that the fungus remains sensitive to the compound.”

Student Version: Plant pathologists recommend “disease management practices that suppress Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and spraying fungicides during the production of young plants.” (Benson and Grand, 2000). Question: Is this plagiarism?

slide56

Benson, D.M., and Grand, L.F. 2000. Incidence of Phytophthora root rot of Fraser fir in North Carolina and sensitivity of Phytophthora cinnamomi to metalaxyl. Plant Dis. 84:661-664.

Yes, This example is clearly plagiarism. The authors have not been cited, and the word order has only been slightly changed.

“Nursery transplants are a potential source of Phytophthora spp. introduction to the field; therefore, disease management practices that suppress Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used in transplant production. All isolates of P. cinnamomi recovered from Fraser fir were sensitive to metalaxyl. Although this fungicide remains a useful management tool, growers should use this fungicide only at labeled rates and recommended frequencies to ensure that the fungus remains sensitive to the compound.”

Student Version: During transplant production, disease management practices that suppress Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used by growers. Question: Is this plagiarism?

slide57

Benson, D.M., and Grand, L.F. 2000. Incidence of Phytophthora root rot of Fraser fir in North Carolina and sensitivity of Phytophthora cinnamomi to metalaxyl. Plant Dis. 84:661-664.

Yes, Even though the authors have been cited this time, this still constitutes plagiarism, because so many of the authors’ words have been copied verbatim. Some people believe that merely changing the order of words is enough, but this is still plagiarism of the original authors’ words. It is also worth noting that the student would not have to read or understand the article to be able to craft this sentence.

“Nursery transplants are a potential source of Phytophthora spp. introduction to the field; therefore, disease management practices that suppress Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used in transplant production. All isolates of P. cinnamomi recovered from Fraser fir were sensitive to metalaxyl. Although this fungicide remains a useful management tool, growers should use this fungicide only at labeled rates and recommended frequencies to ensure that the fungus remains sensitive to the compound.”

Student Version 5: During transplant production, disease management practices that suppress Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used by growers (Benson and Grand, 2000). Question: Is this plagiarism?

slide58

Benson, D.M., and Grand, L.F. 2000. Incidence of Phytophthora root rot of Fraser fir in North Carolina and sensitivity of Phytophthora cinnamomi to metalaxyl. Plant Dis. 84:661-664.

No! A citation is not required if the information is common knowledge. In the field of Plant Pathology it is common knowledge that the correct labeled rates and spray frequencies for fungicides should be adhered to in order to reduce the chance of resistance developing in a pathogen.

“Nursery transplants are a potential source of Phytophthora spp. introduction to the field; therefore, disease management practices that suppress Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used in transplant production. All isolates of P. cinnamomi recovered from Fraser fir were sensitive to metalaxyl. Although this fungicide remains a useful management tool, growers should use this fungicide only at labeled rates and recommended frequencies to ensure that the fungus remains sensitive to the compound.”

Student Version 6: To reduce the chance of developing resistance, metalaxyl should only be used at labeled rates and at recommended spray intervals. Question: Is this plagiarism?

slide59

Benson, D.M., and Grand, L.F. 2000. Incidence of Phytophthora root rot of Fraser fir in North Carolina and sensitivity of Phytophthora cinnamomi to metalaxyl. Plant Dis. 84:661-664.

No! This is not plagiarism. The student has written the information in his/her own words and has clearly given credit to the authors for their work. In addition, the student would have had to read and understand the paper to write these sentences.

“Nursery transplants are a potential source of Phytophthora spp. introduction to the field; therefore, disease management practices that suppress Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used in transplant production.All isolates of P. cinnamomi recovered from Fraser fir were sensitive to metalaxyl. Although this fungicide remains a useful management tool, growers should use this fungicide only at labeled rates and recommended frequencies to ensure that the fungus remains sensitive to the compound.”

Student Version 7: Benson and Grand (2000) recommend the use of management practices, beyond the use of metalaxyl, that aid in the suppression of Phytophthora in Fraser fir. In their work all Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates tested were, at a minimum, inhibited approximately 90% by metalaxyl. Though this work shows that currently resistance to metalaxyl has not developed in Fraser fir transplant production, the possibility of resistance occurring remains, so utilization of raised nursery beds and nursery bed fumigation should be considered to reduce selection pressure by multiple metalaxyl applications (Benson and Grand, 2000). Question: Is this plagiarism?

slide60

Benson, D.M., and Grand, L.F. 2000. Incidence of Phytophthora root rot of Fraser fir in North Carolina and sensitivity of Phytophthora cinnamomi to metalaxyl. Plant Dis. 84:661-664.

No! This is not plagiarism. The student has written the information in his/her own words and has clearly given credit to the authors for their work. In addition, the student would have had to read and understand the paper to write these sentences.

“Nursery transplants are a potential source of Phytophthora spp. introduction to the field; therefore, disease management practices that suppress Phytophthora spp., such as raised nursery beds, fumigation, and fungicides, should be used in transplant production.All isolates of P. cinnamomi recovered from Fraser fir were sensitive to metalaxyl. Although this fungicide remains a useful management tool, growers should use this fungicide only at labeled rates and recommended frequencies to ensure that the fungus remains sensitive to the compound.”

Student Version 7: Benson and Grand (2000) recommend the use of management practices, beyond the use of metalaxyl, that aid in the suppression of Phytophthora in Fraser fir. In their work all Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates tested were, at a minimum, inhibited approximately 90% by metalaxyl. Though this work shows that currently resistance to metalaxyl has not developed in Fraser fir transplant production, the possibility of resistance occurring remains, so utilization of raised nursery beds and nursery bed fumigation should be considered to reduce selection pressure by multiple metalaxyl applications (Benson and Grand, 2000). Question: Is this plagiarism?

budget and financial3
Budget and Financial

Increase new institution subscription fee to $1,750 in Fall 2009.

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