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Allen Overstreet Bureau of Re-Entry Programs & Education Correctional Education. Overview of Services. Correctional Education Impact on Recidivism . Releasees who had a GED recidivated 7.9% less than inmates overall.

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Allen overstreet bureau of re entry programs education correctional education

Allen OverstreetBureau of Re-Entry Programs & EducationCorrectional Education

Overview of Services


Correctional education impact on recidivism
Correctional EducationImpact on Recidivism

  • Releasees who had a GED recidivated 7.9% less than inmates overall.

  • Releasees who had a Vocational Certificate recidivated 14% less than inmates overall.

  • Releasees who had a GED and a Vocational Certificate recidivated 18.3% less than inmates overall.


Correctional education return on investment for crime victims tax payers
Correctional EducationReturn on Investment for Crime Victims & Tax Payers

  • 4 national studies on recidivism indicate that crime victims and tax payers realize a $12.09 return on investment for every dollar expended on adult and post-secondary education.

  • 17 national studies on recidivism indicate that crime victims and tax payers realize a $12.62 return on investment for every dollar expended on vocational education.


Correctional education
Correctional Education

  • 381 permanent, 10 temporary & 19 contract positions

  • Total budget for FY 2010-11: $23,970,843

  • Federal Grants: $6,840,800

    • ABE, Title I, Title II, IDEA, Perkins & Specter

    • 84% of grant funds are expended on staff

    • 88 education positions are federal grant funded

  • All institutional education administrators and teachers are certified


Correctional education1
Correctional Education

  • Inmates are administered the Tests of Adult Basic Education (TABE) during reception

  • Inmates under 22 years of age are screened for special education history during reception

  • Inmates are assessed for vocational training needs during reception

  • The median educational level achieved by Inmates administered TABEs was Grade 6.9


Adult education populations with priority needs
Adult EducationPopulations With Priority Needs

  • Adults within 3 years of release and do not have GEDs

  • Youthful offenders who do not have GEDs

  • Exceptional Students who do not have HSDs

  • Inmates scoring below 6th grade on the TABE


Adult education
Adult Education

  • Adult & Special Education Programs

    • Operating in 21 correctional facilities

    • Provide special education services in accordance with IEPs

  • Inmate Teaching Assistant (ITA) Programs

    • Operating in 26 correctional facilities

    • ITAs must complete a training program

  • Quarterly TABE, PreGED (OPT) & GED testing


Adult education1
Adult Education

  • Close Management Programs

    • Programs operating at 5 correctional facilities

    • Cell-front and/or small group instruction

    • Students visited by academic teacher biweekly

  • Local Education Agency-Operated Programs

    • Programs operated by school districts or state colleges

    • Programs operating at 10 correctional facilities

  • No State-funded Post-Secondary Programs


Vocational education populations with priority needs
Vocational EducationPopulations With Priority Needs

  • Adults within 3 years of release who lack occupational skills and/or a work history

  • Youthful offenders and Exceptional Students


Vocational education
Vocational Education

  • Department-Operated Programs

    • 84 programs covering 33 occupational trades

    • Operating in 36 institutions

    • Courses taught by certified Vocational Teachers

    • Programs utilize Florida Department of Education approved curriculum frameworks

  • Basic literacy skills proficiency required for most students


Vocational education specter grant program
Vocational EducationSpecter Grant Program

  • Federal grant funded program

  • Courses must be conducted by accredited post-secondary institutions

  • Participants must be under 36 years and have a high school diploma or GED

  • Courses conducted at 9 correctional facilities in 5 occupational trades



Correctional education2
Correctional Education

  • 70.6% of the FY2009-10 releasees recommended to participate in Adult Education did not get enrolled.

  • 78.9% of the FY2009-10 releasees recommended to participate in Vocational Education did not get enrolled.


Correctional education ongoing future initiatives
Correctional EducationOngoing & Future Initiatives

  • Utilize CINAS / AIRS to determine inmate needs for programming and access

  • Establish Adult Education Programs in all correctional institutions

  • Expand ESOL Programs


Correctional education ongoing future initiatives1
Correctional EducationOngoing & Future Initiatives

  • Explore use of 1/4-time assignments in Adult Education

  • Increase the number of volunteer literacy programs at work camps, road prisons, etc.

  • Establish GED-level programming at Work Release Centers


Correctional education ongoing future initiatives2
Correctional EducationOngoing & Future Initiatives

  • Expand the Ready To Work initiative

  • Work with partner institutions to expand special education services

  • Conduct a comprehensive review of the department’s vocational education program


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