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Born in Brooklyn in 1900. Studies in Paris with Nadia Boulanger 1921-25. Back in the US in 1924. 1930s: involvement with the Communist Party, although he didn’t become a member.

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Aaron copland life

  • Born in Brooklyn in 1900.

  • Studies in Paris with Nadia Boulanger 1921-25.

  • Back in the US in 1924.

  • 1930s: involvement with the Communist Party, although he didn’t become a member.

  • First trip to Mexico 1932. Additional trips sponsored by the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs in 1941, 47, 54 and 66.

  • 1939 first book: What to listen for in Music. Three more until 1960

  • 1940 First season at Tanglewood (will keep going until 1964).

  • Pulitzer Prize for Appalachian Spring 1945. Oscar for The Heiress.

  • Died in Westchester in 1990, after suffering from Alzheimer’s for 10 years.

Aaron CoplandLife

Copland at his house in Ossining

Prepared by Americas Society with generous support from Citi Foundation.

[email protected]


Aaron copland music
Aaron CoplandMusic

Piano Variations 1930, premiered 1931

Salon Mexico – finished 1936, premiered in Mexico 1937

Appalachian Spring – Ballet for Martha Graham, Pulitzer for music in 1945

Closest correspondent in Latin America was Mexican composer and conductor Carlos Chávez (1899-1978)

Prepared by Americas Society with generous support from Citi Foundation.

[email protected]


Aaron copland trip to venezuela in 1954
Aaron CoplandTrip to Venezuela in 1954

  • Primer Festival Latinoamericano de Música Contemporánea

  • 40 symphonic pieces from 7 countries, including:

    • Obertura para el Fausto criollo (1948, Alberto Ginastera)

    • Sinfonía para cuerdas, (1950, Héctor Tosar)

    • Choros #9(1929, Heitor Villa-Lobos)

    • Sinfonía de Antígona (1933, Carlos Chávez)

  • Official account:

    • Good orchestra, […] lively cultural organization.

    • …no surprise that Villa-Lobos and Chavez confirmed their reputation as the two leaders in Latin-American composition.

    • Chávez balanced vibrant indianism of his popular Sinfonía India with with the austerities of the Sinfonía de Antígona.

  • In private:

    • Very unhappy with V-L, thought Ginastera’s piece uncharacteristic and Tosar’s music stiff.

    • Really liked Chávez’s concert and his pieces.

Prepared by Americas Society with generous support from Citi Foundation.

[email protected]


Instituto ditella
Instituto DiTella

  • The ITdT was founded in 1958. its music branch, the Centro Latinoamericano de Altos Estudios Musicales (CLAEM) opened in 1962.

  • Major funding from the Ford Foundation (in the order of $250,000 annually until 1970). Adjusted for inflation, this figure is about $3,000,000.

  • Alberto Ginastera, dean of Argentinean composers directed, assisted by Gerardo Gandini, now himself a leading composer in his 70s.

  • Some of the most distinguished figures of the musical world lectured at the CLAEM, including Copland, Xenakis, Messiaen and others.

  • As the funding dried out in 1970, the CLAEM was transferred to the city of Buenos Aires. The ITdT and its university continue to this day, dedicated to the social sciences.

Prepared by Americas Society with generous support from Citi Foundation.

[email protected]


Instituto ditella1
Instituto DiTella

  • Some composers and works:

  • Cesar Bolaños (Peru): Intensidad y altura, first piece written in the CLAEM

  • Ariel Martínez (Argentina): El glotón de Pepperland, last piece written in 1970 before it closed.

  • Pedro Caryveschi (Argentina): Integracionesparaboloides, first using the graphics conversion machine.

  • Oscar Bazán (Argentina): Parcas, not done at the CLAEM but my favorite pieces.

Prepared by Americas Society with generous support from Citi Foundation.

[email protected]


Electronic music

Started in the 1950s

Two basic ways of making it initially:

Tape recorders (musique concrète)

Synthesizers

Sound

We can understand and study sound following four basic parameters:

Duration is measured in minutes and seconds and, in music, with figures and tempo indications.

Timbre lets us tell what instrument is playing. Many factors play in its definition; one of them is harmoniccontent. When a musical instrument moves, its different parts will move at different speeds and in different directions. What we hear is, in fact, the combination of these many vibrations. This creates a unique waveform that tells us what instrument is playing or who is speaking.

Pitch lets us differentiate a low sound from a high one. It is measured in Hz or, in musical terms, with note names or Cents, a pitch unit that divides the semitone in 100 parts.

Intensity makes us perceive sounds as loud or soft. It is measured in Db (decibels), in music, it is indicated by the dynamic symbols (p, f, etc.).

Electronic Music

Prepared by Americas Society with generous support from Citi Foundation.

[email protected]


Electronic instruments
Electronic Instruments

A

O

F

K

LFO

EG

O: Oscillator

F: Filter

A: Amplifier/Speakers

K: Keyboard

LFO: Low Frequency (Slow) Oscillator

EG: Envelope Generator

Audio

Control

Prepared by Americas Society with generous support from Citi Foundation.

[email protected]


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