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COCA Conference Call: H1N1Update: Epidemiology and Clinical Features H1N1 Vaccine: Development, Manufacturing a nd Program Implementation. Joseph Bresee, MD Tom Shimabukuro, MD, MPH, MBA Pascale Wortley, MD, MPH. July 15, 2009. Continuing Education Disclaimer.

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COCA Conference Call:H1N1Update: Epidemiology and Clinical FeaturesH1N1 Vaccine: Development, Manufacturingand Program Implementation

Joseph Bresee, MD

Tom Shimabukuro, MD, MPH, MBA

Pascale Wortley, MD, MPH

July 15, 2009


Continuing education disclaimer
Continuing Education Disclaimer

In compliance with continuing education requirements, all presenters must disclose any financial or other relationships with the manufacturers of commercial products, suppliers of commercial services, or commercial supporters as well as any use of unlabeled product(s) or product(s) under investigational use. CDC, our planners, and our presenters wish to disclose they have no financial interests or other relationships with the manufacturers of commercial products, suppliers of commercial services, or commercial supporters. This presentation does not involve the unlabeled use of a product or product under investigational use.There is no commercial support.


Accrediting statements
Accrediting Statements

  • CME: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  • CNE: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited as a provider of Continuing Nursing Education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. This activity provides 1 contact hour.

  • CEU: The CDC has been approved as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET), 8405 Greensboro Drive, Suite 800, McLean, VA 22102. The CDC is authorized by IACET to offer 0.1 CEU's for this program.

  • CECH: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is a designated event for the CHES to receive 1 Category I contact hour in health education, CDC provider number GA0082.


Update on the epidemiology and clinical features of Novel H1N1

Joseph Bresee, MD

Chief, Epidemiology and Prevention Branch

Influenza Division, NCIRD

Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention

July 15, 2009

The contents of this presentation are those of the presenters and

do not necessarily reflect the views of CDC


Increased swine influenza detection in humans 2005 9

A correction has been published: N Engl J Med 2009;361(1):102.

A correction has been published: N Engl J Med 2009;361(1):102.

Triple-Reassortant Swine Influenza A (H1) in Humans in the United States, 2005–2009

Vivek Shinde, M.D., M.P.H., Carolyn B. Bridges, M.D., Timothy M. Uyeki, M.D., M.P.H, M.P.P., Bo Shu, B.S., Amanda Balish, B.S., Xiyan Xu, M.D., Stephen Lindstrom, Ph.D., Larisa V. Gubareva, M.D., Ph.D., Varough Deyde, Ph.D., Rebecca J. Garten, Ph.D., Meghan Harris, M.P.H., Susan Gerber, M.D., Susan Vagasky, D.V.M., Forrest Smith, M.D., Neal Pascoe, R.N., Karen Martin, M.P.H., Deborah Dufficy, D.V.M., M.P.H., Kathy Ritger, M.D., M.P.H., Craig Conover, M.D., Patricia Quinlisk, M.D., M.P.H., Alexander Klimov, Ph.D., Joseph S. Bresee, M.D., and Lyn Finelli, Dr.P.H.

Triple-Reassortant Swine Influenza A (H1) in Humans in the United States, 2005–2009

Vivek Shinde, M.D., M.P.H., Carolyn B. Bridges, M.D., Timothy M. Uyeki, M.D., M.P.H, M.P.P., Bo Shu, B.S., Amanda Balish, B.S., Xiyan Xu, M.D., Stephen Lindstrom, Ph.D., Larisa V. Gubareva, M.D., Ph.D., Varough Deyde, Ph.D., Rebecca J. Garten, Ph.D., Meghan Harris, M.P.H., Susan Gerber, M.D., Susan Vagasky, D.V.M., Forrest Smith, M.D., Neal Pascoe, R.N., Karen Martin, M.P.H., Deborah Dufficy, D.V.M., M.P.H., Kathy Ritger, M.D., M.P.H., Craig Conover, M.D., Patricia Quinlisk, M.D., M.P.H., Alexander Klimov, Ph.D., Joseph S. Bresee, M.D., and Lyn Finelli, Dr.P.H.

Increased swine influenza detection in humans 2005-9

  • January 2007 – “Novel influenza A” made a Nationally Notifiable Disease but CSTE – part of pandemic preparedness efforts

  • RT-PCR for influenza capabilities developed by public health labs in U.S.

  • Increasing numbers of swine influenza infections in humans being detected from improved surveillance

  • Increasing efforts at states, CDC, and USDA to investigate human cases of swine influenza

Triple-Reassortant Swine Influenza A (H1) in Humans in the United States, 2005–2009

Shinde, et al.

N Engl J Med. 2009 Jun 18;360(25):2616-25

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT


Novel influenza a h1n1 detected

MMWR 2009;361(1):102.

Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Detected

  • March 2009

    • 2 cases of febrile respiratory illness in children in late March

    • No common exposures, no pig contact

    • Uneventful recovery

    • Residents of adjacent counties in southern California

    • Tested because part of enhanced influenza surveillance

  • Reported to CDC as possible Novel influenza A virus infections

  • Swine influenza A (H1N1) virus detected on April 15th,17th at CDC

  • Both viruses genetically identical

    • Contain a unique combination of gene segments previously not recognized among swine or human influenza viruses in the US


Confirmed and probable novel h1n1 cases by report date 10 jun 2009 n 37 246
Confirmed and Probable Novel H1N1 Cases by Report Date 2009;361(1):102.10 JUN 2009 (N=37,246)


Descriptive statistics of novel influenza a h1n1 cases reported to cdc by states 10 jul 2009
Descriptive Statistics of Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Cases Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Sex: 50% male/female

  • Median age:

    - all cases 12 years

    - hospitalized 20 years

    - died 37 years


International map pandemic h1n1 10 jul 2009
International Map Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009Pandemic H1N1 – 10 JUL 2009


Epidemiology/Surveillance Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Hospitalizations Reported to CDC Clinical Characteristics as of 19 JUN 2009 (n=268)


Epidemiology/Surveillance Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Cases Rate per 100,000 Population by Age GroupAs of 09 JULY 2009 (n=35,860*)

n=3621

n=5774

n=1673

n=382

*Excludes 1,386 cases with missing ages.

Rate / 100,000 by Single Year Age Groups: Denominator source: 2008 Census Estimates, U.S. Census Bureau at:

http://www.census.gov/popest/national/asrh/files/NC-EST2007-ALLDATA-R-File24.csv


Epidemiology/Surveillance Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009Pandemic H1N1 Hospitalization Rate per 100,000 Population by Age Group (n=3,779) as of 09 JULY 2009

*Hospitalizations with unknown ages are not included (n=353)

*Rate / 100,000 by Single Year Age Groups: Denominator source: 2008 Census Estimates, U.S. Census Bureau at:

http://www.census.gov/popest/national/asrh/files/NC-EST2007-ALLDATA-R-File24.csv


600 Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

100

500

80

400

60

Deaths Per 100,000 Person Years

Hospitalizations Per 100,000 Person Years

300

40

200

20

100

0

0

0 - 4 Yrs

5 - 49 Yrs

50 - 64 Yrs

65+ Yrs

Age Group

Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations Deaths By Age Group

*Thompson WW, JAMA, 2004


Epidemiology/Surveillance Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009Pandemic H1N1 Hospitalizations Reported to CDC Underlying Conditions as of 19 JUN 2009 (n=268)

*Excludes hypertension


Pandemic h1n1 cases by state rate 100 000 state population as of 9 jul 2009
Pandemic H1N1 Cases by State Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009Rate / 100,000 State Population As of 9 JUL 2009


Epidemiology/Surveillance Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009Pandemic H1N1 – 9 JUL 2009 EDT Percentage of Visits for Influenza-like Illness (ILI) Reported by the US Outpatient Influenza-like Illness Surveillance Network (ILINet),National Summary 2008-09 and Previous Two Seasons

†There was no week 53 during the 2006-07 and 2007-08 seasons, therefore the week 53 data point for those seasons is an average of weeks 52 and 1.


Epidemiology/Surveillance Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009Pandemic (H1N1) – 9 JUL 2009U.S. WHO/NREVSS Collaborating Laboratories Summary, 2008-09

76%*

55%*

80%*

37%*

85%*

73%*

81%*

72%*

* Percentage of all positive influenza specimens that are Influenza A (Pandemic H1N1) or Influenza A (unable to subtype) for the week indicated

68%*

66%*


Summary of antiviral resistance u s 2008 09
Summary of Antiviral Resistance, U.S. 2008-09 Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009


Oseltamivir resistance among pandemic h1n1 viruses
Oseltamivir-resistance among Pandemic H1N1 viruses Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

3 oseltamivir-resistant isolates of Pandemic H1N1 detected

- 2 cases found to have resistant strain while on oseltamivir chemoprophylaxis

Japan and Denmark

- 1 case detected by Hong Kong Department of Health reported a resistant virus isolated from a 16 year-old girl who had a fever upon arrival at the Hong Kong International airport

 Illness began prior to boarding the plane in San Francisco

 No exposure to

 No illness among close contacts

 No sign of community transmission

- Al recovered uneventfully

No change in recommendations for treatment or prophylaxis of persons with influenza


Antiviral treatment recommendations
Antiviral Treatment Recommendations Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Priority: Hospitalized Patients with suspected or confirmed pandemic H1N1 virus infection

    • Treatment recommended with Oseltamivir or Zanamivir

    • Treat patients as soon as possible (duration: 5 days)

  • Outpatients with suspected or confirmed pandemic H1N1 virus infection who are at high risk for complications

    • Persons with chronic pulmonary, cardiac, renal, hepatic, metabolic, hematological disorders; immunosuppression, pregnant women, children <5 years; adults ≥65 years

    • Treatment recommended with Oseltamivir or Zanamivir

    • Treat patients as soon as possible (duration: 5 days)

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/recommendations.htm


Antiviral chemoprophylaxis
Antiviral Chemoprophylaxis Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Post-exposure chemoprophylaxis with Oseltamivir or Zanamivir can be considered:

    • Close contacts of cases who are at high risk for complications of influenza

    • Health care personnel, public health workers, first responders with unprotected close contact exposure to an ill person with pandemic H1N1 virus infection while in the infectious period

    • Chemoprophylaxis: 7-10 days after last known exposure

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/recommendations.htm


Summary of key points
Summary of key points Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Once emerged, pandemic H1N1 virus spread to all 5 states and globally quickly

  • Some areas more affected than others

  • Expect continued summertime circulation with focal outbreaks

  • Elderly seemingly relatively spared

  • Capable of causing severe disease and death

    • Most severe outcomes among people with underlying heath problems that are associated with high risk of influenza complications

  • Virus remains sensitive to oseltamivir and zanamvir


What s next
What’s Next Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Disease likely persists through summer in US, expected surge in fall

  • Severity of Fall epidemic difficult to predict

  • Southern Hemisphere being monitored for subtypes, spread, and severity

  • Vaccine being readied

  • Surveillance continuing

Northern Hemisphere

Southern Hemisphere


Pandemic h1n1 vaccine development and manufacturing

Pandemic H1N1 Vaccine: Development and Manufacturing Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

Tom Shimabukuro, MD, MPH, MBA

Immunization Services Division

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

July 15, 2009


New horizons h1n1 vaccines
New Horizons Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009H1N1 Vaccines

  • National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza (Nov. 2005) goal is to provide vaccine to everyone in U.S. w/in 6 mo. of pandemic onset

  • H1N1 Vaccine Strategy follows pandemic playbook for vaccine development, production, and administration

  • Clinical studies will inform vaccine formulation and safety profile

  • Key decision issues:

    • Vaccine product type

    • Use of thimerosal preservative

    • Use of oil-in-water adjuvant

    • Post-vaccination safety monitoring

Courtesy Robin Robinson, PhD, HHS/ASPR/BARDA Director


Phases of a vaccination program
Phases of a vaccination program Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Vaccine development

  • Commercial scale manufacturing

  • Distribution and administration

  • Post-launch effectiveness, safety and utilization monitoring


Vaccine development
Vaccine development Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Vaccine reference strain development

  • Master seed strain preparation

  • Clinical investigational lot manufacturing

  • Clinical studies

    • To assess immunologic response and safety

    • Will inform formulation decisions


Commercial scale production
Commercial scale production Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Potency assay reagents preparation and calibration

  • Commercial scale bulk antigen manufacturing without adjuvant

  • Commercial bulk antigen manufacturing with adjuvant

  • Bulk adjuvant manufacturing

  • Commercial scale syringe/needle manufacturing

  • Vaccine formulation fill-finish


Courtesy Robin Robinson, PhD, HHS/ASPR/BARDA Director Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009


Vaccine manufacturers
Vaccine manufacturers Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Novartis (45.7%)

    - Also manufactures MF59 adjuvant for potential pre-formulation with vaccine

  • Sanofi Pasteur (26.4%)

  • CSL (18.7%)

  • MedImmune (5.8%)

  • GSK (3.4%)

    - Also manufactures ASO3 adjuvant in a separate vial for potential mixing at the place of administration


Vaccine products general
Vaccine products (general) Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Unadjuvanted multidose vials*

  • Unadjuvanted p-free pre-loaded syringes†

  • Nasal sprayers (live attenuated)†

    Potentially

  • Multidose vials pre-formulated with adjuvant

  • Multidose vials formulated for adjuvant to be mixed at the place of administration (separate antigen and adjuvant vials)

*All multidose vials will contain thimerosal preservative

†Up to 20% of vaccine may be p-free pediatric formulation


Vaccine ancillary supplies
Vaccine ancillary supplies Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Needle/syringe units for multidose vials

  • Sharps containers

  • Alcohol pads

  • Mixing syringes if adjuvanted vaccine is used


Vaccine products
Vaccine products Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Novartis (45.7%)

    - Multidose vials: standard unadjuvanted

    - Multidose vials pre-formulated with Novartis MF59 adjuvant*

  • Sanofi Pasteur (26.4%)

    - Multidose vials: standard unadjuvanted and formulated for GSK ASO3 adjuvant (separate antigen and adjuvant)*

    - P-free pre-loaded syringes

*Decision to use an adjuvanted vaccine is TBD


Vaccine products cont
Vaccine products cont. Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • CSL (18.7%)

    - Multidose vials: standard unadjuvanted and formulated for GSK ASO3 adjuvant (separate antigen and adjuvant)*

    - P-free pre-loaded syringes

  • MedImmune (5.8%)

    - Nasal sprayers, p-free

  • GSK (3.4%)

    - Multidose vials: standard unadjuvanted and formulated for GSK ASO3 adjuvant (separate antigen and adjuvant)*

    - ASO3 adjuvant

*Decision to use an adjuvanted vaccine is TBD


Storage and handling
Storage and handling Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Inactivated vaccine

    - 2-8°C

  • Live attenuated

    - 2-8°C

  • Oil-in-water adjuvant

    - 2-8°C, 2-5 year shelf life

  • Inactivated vaccine mixed with adjuvant

    - Stable up to 8 hours after mixing


Emergency use authorization
Emergency Use Authorization Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

“… use of an unapproved medical product or an unapproved use of an approved medical product during a declared emergency …”

- Unadjuvanted pandemic H1N1 vaccine may be licensed in a manner similar to a seasonal flu vaccine strain change and therefore would not need an EUA

- Adjuvanted vaccines, if used (for the 2009-10 flu season), will be administered under an EUA


Pandemic H1N1 Vaccine: Program Implementation Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

Pascale Wortley, MD, MPH

Immunization Services Division

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

July 15, 2009


Vaccine purchase allocation and distribution
Vaccine purchase, allocation, and distribution Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Vaccine procured and purchased by US government

  • Vaccine will be allocated across states proportional to population

  • Vaccine will be sent to state-designated receiving sites: mix of local health departments and private settings


Vaccine planning assumptions
Vaccine planning assumptions: Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Vaccine available starting mid-October

  • Initial amount: 40, 80, or 160 million doses

    over one month period

  • Subsequent weekly production: 10, 20 or 30 million doses

  • 2 doses required

  • Preservative free single dose syringes for young children and pregnant women


Vaccine planning assumptions1
Vaccine planning assumptions: Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

Populations to plan for:

Students and staff (all ages) associated with schools (K-12) and children (age >6 m) and staff (all ages) in child care centers

  • Pregnant women, children 6m-4yrs, new parents and household contacts of children <6 months of age

  • Non-elderly adults (age <65) with medical conditions that increase risk of influenza

  • Health care workers and emergency services personnel


Delivery model
Delivery model Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

Public health-coordinated effort that blends vaccination in public health-organized clinics and in the private sector (provider offices, workplaces, retail settings)

Private sector providers who wish to administer H1N1 vaccine will need to enter into an agreement with public health in order to receive vaccine


Public health planning efforts
Public Health planning efforts Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Reaching out to private providers (defined broadly) to assess interest in providing H1N1 vaccine

  • Retail sector, pharmacists may be involved

  • Planning large scale clinics

    - Especially important for school-age children given limited private sector capacity


Issues for administration in provider offices
Issues for administration in Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009provider offices

  • Storage capacity

  • Administering according to recommended age groups

  • Reporting doses administered early on

  • Insurance reimbursement for administration


Monitoring vaccine coverage
Monitoring vaccine coverage Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Initially, states will be required to report doses administered on a weekly basis

  • Transition to assessment via population surveys (BRFSS, NIS)


Monitoring vaccine safety
Monitoring vaccine safety Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009

  • Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (1-800-822-7967, http://vaers.hhs.gov/contact.htm ) for signal detection

  • Network of managed care organizations representing approximately 3% of the U.S. population, the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) to test signals.

  • Active surveillance for Guillain Barre Syndrome through states participating in Emerging Infections Program.


Monitoring vaccine effectiveness ve
Monitoring vaccine effectiveness ( Reported to CDC by States-10 JUL 2009VE)

  • VE for prevention of PCR-confirmed medically attended influenza at 4 community-based sites

  • VE for prevention of influenza hospitalizations diagnosed by provider-ordered clinically available tests at 10 sites nationwide through the Emerging Infections Program

  • DoD will be assessing VE in active duty service members


Continuing education credit contact hours for coca conference calls
Continuing Education Credit/Contact Hours for COCA Conference Calls

  • Continuing Education guidelines require that the attendance of all who participate in COCA Conference Calls be properly documented. ALL Continuing Education credits/contact hours (CME, CNE, CEU and CECH) for COCA Conference Calls are issued online through the CDC Training & Continuing Education Online system http://www2a.cdc.gov/TCEOnline/.

  • Those who participate in the COCA Conference Calls and who wish to receive continuing education and will complete the online evaluation by April 16, 2009 will use the course code EC1265. Those who wish to receive continuing education and will complete the online evaluation between April 17, 2009 and March 17, 2010 will use course code WD1265. CE certificates can be printed immediately upon completion of your online evaluation. A cumulative transcript of all CDC/ATSDR CE’s obtained through the CDC Training & Continuing Education Online System will be maintained for each user.


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