African independence economic development in reverse
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African Independence Economic Development in Reverse?. Newly Independent States, Asia and Africa, 1947–1990. I. Motifs. A. Colonial Powers: Belgium, France, Great Britain, Portugal B. Leaders of Newly Independent Countries who were formerly in prison under colonial rule

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African Independence Economic Development in Reverse?

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African independence economic development in reverse

African IndependenceEconomic Development in Reverse?


Newly independent states asia and africa 1947 1990

Newly Independent States, Asia and Africa, 1947–1990


I motifs

I. Motifs

  • A. Colonial Powers: Belgium, France, Great Britain, Portugal

  • B. Leaders of Newly Independent Countries who were formerly in prison under colonial rule

  • C. Main Settler Colonies

  • 1. Algeria3. Rhodesia

  • 2. Kenya4. South Africa


Newly independent states africa 1951 1990

Newly Independent StatesAfrica, 1951–1990


Demographic overview 1880 1975

Demographic Overview, 1880–1975


I motifs continued

I. Motifs (continued)

  • D. Main Oil-Producing Countries

  • 1. Algeria4. Gabon

  • 2. Angola5. Libya

  • 3. Egypt6. Nigeria


Ii case studies

II. Case Studies

  • A. Ghana (formerly the Gold Coast)

  • 1. Personages

  • a. Kwame Nkrumah (1909–72), Prime Minister, 1957–60; President 1960–66

  • 2. Products: cacao, gold, timber

  • 3. Projects

  • a. Akosombo Dam

  • b. Valco Aluminum Works


West africa

West Africa


Ghana satellite image

Ghana Satellite Image


Akosombo dam view from the volta hotel

Akosombo Dam, view from the Volta Hotel


Akosombo hydroelectric plant on lake volta

Akosombo hydroelectric plant on Lake Volta


Ghana relief map

Ghana Relief Map


Ghana regions

Ghana Regions


Kwame nkrumah and martin luther king jr 1957

Kwame Nkrumah and Martin Luther King, Jr., 1957


Ii case studies1

II. Case Studies

  • B. Kenya

  • 1. Peoples

  • a. Kikuyuc. Merue. Luog. Kamba

  • b. Embud. Luhyaf. Kalenjinh. Kisii

  • 2. Personages

  • a. Jomo Kenyatta (ca. 1894–1978), Prime Minister, then President, 1963–1978

  • Makers: – Kenyatta, Suffering without Bitterness (Kapenguria trial)

  • – Barnett and Njama, Mau Mau from Within (Mau Mau rituals)

  • – Jeremy Murray-Brown, Kenyatta (rush to judgment)


Ii case studies2

II. Case Studies

  • B. Kenya

  • 3. Terms: uhuru (freedom); Mau Mau

  • 4. Organizations

  • a. Kenya African Union

  • b. “Land and Freedom”


Kenya relief map

Kenya Relief Map


Kenya satellite image

Kenya Satellite Image


Kenya dialect map

Kenya Dialect Map


Jomo kenyatta ca 1894 1978 prime minister then president 1963 1978

Jomo Kenyatta (ca. 1894–1978)Prime Minister, then President, 1963–1978


Ii case studies3

II. Case Studies

  • C. Algeria

  • 1. Personages

  • a. Ahmed Ben Bella (1916– ), Premier, 1962–63, President, 1963–1965

  • b. Charles de Gaulle (1890–1970). President of France 1958–1969

  • 2. Organization: FLN (Front of National Liberation)


Ahmed ben bella 1919 premier 1962 63 president 1963 65

Ahmed Ben Bella (1919– ), Premier, 1962–63, President, 1963–65


Ii case studies4

II. Case Studies

  • D. Democratic Republic of Congo

  • (formerly Zaire; formerly Belgian Congo)

  • (Note: not to be confused with Republic of Congo)

  • 1. Personages

  • a. Patrice Lumumba (1925–1961), Prime Minister, 1960–61

  • b. Joseph Kasavubu (ca. 1917–1969), President, 1960–1965

  • c. “Joseph” Mobutu Sese Seko (1930–1997), ruler 1965–1997

  • d. Dag Hammarskjold (1905–1961), UN Secretary-General, 1953–1961


Ii case studies5

II. Case Studies

  • E. Nigeria

  • 1. Peoples

  • a. Hausa (in the north)

  • b. Ibo (in the east)> Biafra

  • c. Yoruba (in the west)


Nigeria

Nigeria


Ii case studies6

II. Case Studies

  • F. Mozambique

  • 1. Organization: FRELIMO (Mozambique Front of Liberation)


Ii case studies7

II. Case Studies

  • G. Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia; formerly Southern Rhodesia)

  • 1. Personages

  • a. Ian Smith (1919–2007), Prime Minister 1964–1979

  • b. Robert Mugabe (1924– ), Prime Minister, 1980–

  • 2. Organizations

  • a. Zimbabwe African People’s Union (ZAPU)

  • b. Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU)

  • 3. Term: Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI)


Zimbabwe regions

Zimbabwe Regions


Zimbabwe satellite image

Zimbabwe Satellite Image


Ian smith 1919 prime minister 1964 1979

Ian Smith (1919– ) Prime Minister 1964–1979


Robert mugabe and canaan banana

Robert Mugabe and Canaan Banana


Idi amin dada 1925 2003

Idi Amin Dada (1925–2003)

  • President of Uganda, 1971–1979

  • – killed 300,000 to 500,000 Ugandans

  • –Chairman of the Organization of African Unity 1975–1976

  • –Entebbe Raid

  • – In 1973, U.S. Ambassador Thomas Patrick Melady

  •  recommended that the United States reduce its presence in Uganda. Melady described Amin’s regime as “racist, erratic and unpredictable, brutal, inept, bellicose, irrational, ridiculous, and militaristic.”

  • –1979, Amin fled to Libya, then Saudi Arabia


Idi amin dada 1925 20031

Idi Amin Dada (1925–2003)


African independence economic development in reverse

  • http://www.imdb.com/media/rm1693617408/tt0455590


Ii case studies8

II. Case Studies

  • H. South Africa

  • 1. Personages

  • a. P[ietre] W[illem] Botha (1916–2006 )

  • Prime Minister, 1978–1984; President 1984–1989

  • b. F[rederik] W[illem] de Klerk (1936– )

  • Prime Minister, 1989–1994

  • c. Nelson Mandela (1918– ), President, 1994–1999

  • Makers:

  • – Mandela, The Struggle Is My Life (decision to continue

  • underground work)

  • – Jacques Derrida, “The Laws in Reflection” (Admirable Mandela)

  • – Sheridan Johns and R. Hunt Davis Jr., Mandela, Tambo, and the African National Congress (Mandela in the 1990s)


South africa and black homelands 1960s

South Africa and Black Homelands, 1960s


P ietre w illem botha 1916 prime minister 1978 84 president 1984 89

P[ietre] W[illem] Botha (1916– ), Prime Minister, 1978–84; President 1984–89


F rederik w illem de klerk 1936 prime minister 1989 1994

F[rederik] W[illem] de Klerk (1936– ), Prime Minister, 1989–1994


The young nelson mandela

The Young Nelson Mandela


Nelson mandela 1918 president 1994 1999 photo from 2008

Nelson Mandela (1918– ), President, 1994–1999. Photo from 2008.


Ii case studies9

II. Case Studies

  • H. South Africa

  • 1. Personages (continued)

  • d. Oliver Tambo (1917–1993)

  • President of ANC, 1967–1991

  • e. Bishop Desmond Tutu (1931– )

  • (1) archbishop of Capetown (1986–1996)

  • (2) Nobel Peace Prize

  • - civil rights for all

  • - common system of education

  • - abolition of internal passports

  • - cessation of deportation to “homelands”


Bishop desmond tutu 1931

Bishop Desmond Tutu (1931– )


Ii case studies10

II. Case Studies

  • H. South Africa

  • 2. Terms:

  • a. Apartheidc. “Bantu”

  • b. Afrikaanerd. “Truth and Reconciliation”

  • 3. Organization: African National Congress (ANC)


Ii case studies11

II. Case Studies

  • H. South Africa (continued)

  • 4. Events

  • a. Sharpeville Massacre (1960)

  • b. Rivonia Trial (1964)

  • c. Overthrow of Portuguese colonial rule in Mozambique and Angola (1975)

  • d. Defeat of South African forces in Angola (1976)

  • e. Soweto School Boycott (1976)


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