A mda compliant environment for developing user interfaces of information systems
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 71

A MDA-Compliant Environment for Developing User Interfaces of Information Systems PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 59 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

A MDA-Compliant Environment for Developing User Interfaces of Information Systems. Jean Vanderdonckt [email protected] Head of BCHI Lab, http://www.isys.ucl.ac.be/bchi. « Everything you can imagine is real » (Picasso). « Everything you model can be turned into a real interface ».

Download Presentation

A MDA-Compliant Environment for Developing User Interfaces of Information Systems

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


A mda compliant environment for developing user interfaces of information systems

A MDA-Compliant Environment for Developing User Interfaces of Information Systems

Jean Vanderdonckt

[email protected]

Head of BCHI Lab, http://www.isys.ucl.ac.be/bchi

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


A mda compliant environment for developing user interfaces of information systems

« Everything you can imagine is real » (Picasso)

« Everything you model can be turned into a real interface »

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Outline

Outline

  • Conceptual modeling of user interfaces

  • Forward engineering

  • Reverse engineering

  • Lateral engineering

  • Conclusion

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 1 why is conceptual modeling of user interfaces desirable

1.1 Why is conceptual modeling of user interfaces desirable?

  • “The presentation layer outside the scope of CSCD” (Antoni Olivé)

    • A domain model is certainly not a presentation model, but there could be a mapping between

  • UIs remained for many years the poor parent of conceptual modeling and software engineering

    • It emerged during late 80’s

    • Still growing

  • The complexity and the variety of user interfaces (UI) is dramatically increasing

  • The paradigm of « one system fits all » is no longer valid

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 1 diversity of users

1.1 Diversity of users

  • Traditional users

  • People with disabilities

    • Visual, motor, cognitive

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 1 variety of tasks

1.1 Variety of tasks

[Forrester Research, Inc., 2003]

  • Users want to determine their path on each platform

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 1 heterogeneousness of platforms

1.1 Heterogeneousness of platforms

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 1 multiplicity of contexts of use

1.1 Multiplicity of contexts of use

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 1 consequence

Platform #1

Platform #2

Platform #3

Platform #4

Application 1

UI #1

UI #2

UI #3

UI #4

Application 2

UI #5

UI #6

UI #7

UI #8

Application 3

UI #9

UI #10

UI #11

UI #12

Platform model #1

Platform #1

UI model #1

Application 1

Platform model #2

Platform #2

UI model #2

Application 2

Platform model #3

Platform #3

UI model #3

Application 3

Platform model #4

Platform #4

1.1 Consequence

  • Proliferation of developments

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 1 consequence1

1.1 Consequence

  • Why is it difficult?

    • For the designer:

      • Multiplicity of contexts of use

      • No systematic design method

    • For the user:

      • Poor usability of resulting UI

      • UI not adapted to the genuine context of use

    • For the developer:

      • Increase of development and maintenance costs

      • Increasing development complexity

      • Little of no factoring out of common elements

Fold & Drop technique: P. Dragicevic

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 2 what does it cover

1.2 What does it cover?

  • Conceptual modeling should cover

    • Presentation: external manifestation of the UI that is perceivable to the user (static)

    • Dialog: ordering in time and space of operations performed by the user/system (dynamic)

    • Modalities of interaction

      • Graphical

      • Vocal

      • Haptic, tactile

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 2 what does it cover1

Platform

Environment

User

Domain

Task

1.2 What does it cover?

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 abstraction 1 the concrete ui

1.3 Abstraction #1: the concrete UI

  • Starting point: FUI = Final User Interface

    • Mark-up languages: HTML, WML, cHTML

    • Programming languages: Visual Basic, Java

  • Many manifestations of the same object

  • Abstraction with respect to the toolkit

    • Presentation aspects

    • Events: generating, passing, controlling

    • Attributes: external (e.g., font) vs internal (e.g. state)

    • Primitives: life cycle

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 abstraction 1 the concrete ui1

IO created

IO displayed

IO activated

IO deactivated

IO undisplayed

IO destroyed

PR_IO_Deactivate

PR_IO_Create

PR_IO_Display

PR_IO_Activate

PR_OI_Erase

PR_OI_Destroy

PR_IO_Activate

PR_IO_ChangeAttribute

1.3 Abstraction #1: the concrete UI

[Vanderdonckt & Bodart, 1993]

  • Definitions

    • Original: Abstract Interaction Object = abstraction of the same Concrete Interaction Objects independently of their underlying presentation and dialog

    • We have introduced this abstraction in 1993!

    • Current: Concrete Interaction Object = abstraction of interaction objects with respect to the underlying toolkit

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 abstraction 1 the concrete ui2

Each graphicalCIO has specific properties such as isVisible, isEnabled, fgColor, and bgColor.

Each graphicalCIO is sub-typed into one of the two possible categories: graphicalContainer, and graphicalIndividualComponent

CUI Model

CIO

graphicalCIO

graphicalContainer

graphicalContainer

graphicalIndividualComponent

graphicalIndividualComponent

1.3 Abstraction #1: the concrete UI

[Limbourg, 2004]

CUI Model

CUI Model

CIO

CIO

graphicalCIO

graphicalCIO

graphicalContainer

graphicalContainer

graphicalIndividualComponent

graphicalIndividualComponent

GrafiXML

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 abstraction 2 the abstract ui

1.3 Abstraction #2: the abstract UI

  • Different CIOs can be used for the same purpose, but with different interaction modalities

  • Definition

    • Abstract Container = set of Abstract Individual Component

    • AIC = abstraction of CIOs of the same type, but independently of any interaction modality

    • Abstract User Interface (AUI) = decomposition into AC+AIC

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 abstraction 2 the abstract ui1

1.3 Abstraction #2: the abstract UI

[Limbourg, 2004]

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 abstraction 2 the abstract ui2

Abs.container

A. component

input

output

navigation

control

select

1.3 Abstraction #2: the abstract UI

[Montero et al., 2005]

  • Notation: based on canonical abstract prototypes: Larry Constantine, Helmut Windl, James Noble, & Lucy Lockwood: http://www.forUse.com

IdealXML

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 abstraction 3 the task

1.3 Abstraction #3: the task

[Paternò et al., 1997]

  • Task = set of actions carried out by a user in a given context to reach a goal

  • Logical decomposition of task into sub-tasks

  • Temporal ordering: LOTOS operators

    • T1 >> T2Enabling

    • T1 [ ]>> T2Enabling + information passing

    • T1 |> T2Suspend/resume

    • T1 [ ] T2Choice

    • T1 [> T2Disabling (e.g. Form submit)

    • T1 |=| T2Independence (any order, but finished)

    • T1*Iteration

    • T1{n}Finite iteration

    • T1 ||| T2Concurrency

    • T1 |[x]| T2Concurrency + information passing

    • [T] Optional

    • TRecursion

CTTE Editor

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 abstraction 3 the task1

1.3 Abstraction #3: the task

  • Task definition = action + object

    • Action types

      • Acquire, render, modify, publish, compute, derive,…

    • Object types:

      • Element, list, table, collection, compound,…

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 abstraction 3 the task2

1.3 Abstraction #3: the task

[Limbourg, 2004]

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 abstraction 4 the context of use

1.3 Abstraction #4: the context of use

[Cameleon project, 2004]

  • Context of use= triple (U,P,E) where

    • U is a user model: from cognitive psychology

    • P is a platform model: subset of UAProf (W3C)

    • E is an environment model: from ubiquitous computing

Pick & Drop technique: J. Rekimoto

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 abstraction 4 the context of use1

1.3 Abstraction #4: the context of use

[Limbourg, 2004]

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 mapping the models

triggers (tg):{ , } x

updates (up): x

observes (ob): x

isExecutedIn (ex): x

manipulates (ma):{ , } x

These mappings can be established:

1.3 Mapping the models

[Montero et al., 2005]

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 3 mapping the models1

1.3 Mapping the models

[Limbourg, 2004]

  • Mapping the models with a mapping model (!!)

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 4 what do we have so far

1.4 What do we have so far?

Method triggered: download a file

Object: computer file

Task

Task

&

&

Task

Task

Classes

Classes

Domain

Modality-independent

Control AIC

Abstract Individual Component

Abstract User

Abstract User

Interface (

Interface (

AUI

AUI

)

)

Digital control AIC

Physical control AIC

Toolkit-independent

Concrete Interaction Object

Graphical 2D push button

Graphical 3D push button

Physical push button

Concrete

Concrete

User

User

Interface (CUI)

Interface (CUI)

HTML push button

Windows push button

OSF/Motif

XmButton

VRML97/X3D

button

Software

key

Function

key

Code

Code

<input type=submit value=“Download" name=

Final User

Final User

Interface (FUI)

Interface (FUI)

Rendering

Rendering

Down

Down

Down

Download

Download

Download

Load

Load

Load

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


1 4 what do we have so far1

Platform S

Environment S

Reification

1.4 What do we have so far?

S=Source context of use

User S

Task and

Domain S

UsiXML

supported

model

Abstract user

Interface S

UsiXML

unsupported

model

Concrete user

Interface S

Final user

Interface S

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 forward engineering

2. Forward engineering

[Limbourg, 2004]

  • 2.1 Task and domain models

  • 2.2 From T&D to AUI

    • Model-to-model transformation

  • 2.3 From AUI to CUI

    • Model-to-model transformation

  • 2.4 From CUI to FUI

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 1 task and domain models

2.1 Task and domain models

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 1 task and domain models1

2.1 Task and domain models

[Limbourg, 2004]

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 1 task and domain models2

2.1 Task and domain models

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 2 from t d to aui

2.2 From T&D to AUI

[Limbourg, 2004]

  • Definition of AUI structure

    • Which objects should be logically grouped?

  • Definition of AIC types

    • Which « functionnality » should assume AICs and what data do they manipulate ?

  • Definition of spatio-temporal arrangement

    • How should AIC be arranged in space and/or in time ?

  • Definition of dialog control

    • What is the valid flow of action on AIOs ?

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 2 from t d to aui1

2.2 From T&D to AUI

[Limbourg, 2004]

  • Definition of AUI structure

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 2 from t d to aui2

2.2 From T&D to AUI

[Limbourg, 2004]

  • Definition of AIC types

AC = Abstract Component

AIC = Abstract Individual Component

CIC = Concrete Interaction Component

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 2 from t d to aui3

2.2 From T&D to AUI

[Limbourg, 2004]

  • Definition of spatio-temporal arrangement

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 2 from t d to aui4

2.2 From T&D to AUI

  • All transformations are in UsiXML

    • Each model = instance of meta-model

    • Each model = graph as instance of graph type

    • Each model-to-model transformation =

      • graph transformation

      • Set of productions

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 2 from t d to aui5

2.2 From T&D to AUI

[Limbourg, 2004]

  • Typed model-to-model transformation

Meta-Meta-Model

Graph Structure

is instance of

Meta-Model

Our Meta-Model

Meta-Model Subset 1

Meta-Model Subset 2

e.g., Task+Domain Model

e.g., Concrete UI Model

Uses language

is instance of

is instance of

Initial UI Model

Transformation Rule

Resultant UI Model

e.g., MyTaskAndDomainModel

Our transformation catalog

e.g., MyConcreteUIModel

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 2 from t d to aui6

2.2 From T&D to AUI

  • TransformiXML

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 3 from aui to cui

2.3 From AUI to CUI

[Limbourg, 2004]

  • Definition of CUI structure

    • Which AIC is a window?

  • Definition of CIO type

    • Which « widget » should represent which AIO ?

  • Definition of placement

    • What layout can be specified between CIOs

    • Definition of navigation

    • Which container can be started or closed from which container?

  • Definition of dialog control

    • What is the dialog local to each CIO?

    • What is the valid flow of action on CIOs?

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 3 from aui to cui1

NAC

NAC

LHS

LHS

RHS

RHS

::=

::=

2.3 From AUI to CUI

[Limbourg, 2004]

  • Definition of CIO structure

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 3 from aui to cui2

2.3 From AUI to CUI

[Limbourg, 2004]

  • Definition of placement

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 4 from cui to fui

2.4 From CUI to FUI

  • Model-to-code transformation

    • By rendering (interpretation)

      • Java (InterpiXML)

      • Tcl/tk (QtkiXML)

      • Flash (FlashiXML)

    • By code generation

      • HTML

      • Visual Basic

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


2 4 what do we have so far

Platform S

Environment S

Reification

Abstraction

2.4 What do we have so far?

S=Source context of use

User S

Task and

Domain S

UsiXML

supported

model

Abstract user

Interface S

UsiXML

unsupported

model

Concrete user

Interface S

Final user

Interface S

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


3 reverse engineering

3. Reverse engineering

  • 3.1 From FUI to CUI

  • 3.2 From CUI to AUI, task & domain

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


3 1 from fui to cui

3.1 From FUI to CUI

[Bouillon & Vanderdonckt, 2004]

  • Do you have the source code?

    • Markup languages (e.g., HTML): static code analysis (ReversiXML)

  • Do you have the compiled code?

    • Programming languages (e.g., compiled C): resource file extraction and static code analysis

  • Do you have the running application?

    • Video analysis: computer vision

  • Do you have only the documentation?

    • Image analysis: image processing

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


3 1 from fui to cui1

3.1 From FUI to CUI

[Bouillon & Vanderdonckt, 2004]

  • ReversiXML

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


3 2 from cui to aui task domain

3.2 From CUI to AUI, task & domain

[Limbourg, 2004]

  • Code-to-model and model-to-model

    • CUI to AUI

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


3 2 from cui to aui task domain1

3.2 From CUI to AUI, task & domain

  • Re-engineering = reverse + forward

  • Possible re-interpretation by QtkiXML

[Bouillon & Vanderdonckt, 2004]

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


3 2 what do we have so far

Platform S

Environment S

Reification

Abstraction

3.2 What do we have so far?

S=Source context of use

User S

Task and

Domain S

UsiXML

supported

model

Abstract user

Interface S

UsiXML

unsupported

model

Concrete user

Interface S

Final user

Interface S

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


3 2 what do we want to get

Platform S

Environment S

Platform T

Environment T

Reflexion

Reification

Abstraction

Translation

3.2 What do we want to get?

[Cameleon project, 2004]

S=Source context of use

T=Target context of use

User S

User T

http://www.plasticity.org

Task and

Domain S

Task and

Domain T

UsiXML

supported

model

Abstract user

Interface S

Abstract user

Interface T

UsiXML

unsupported

model

Concrete user

Interface S

Concrete user

Interface T

Final user

Interface S

Final user

Interface T

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


3 3 lateral engineering

3.3 Lateral engineering

  • Definition = model-to-model transformation applied at the same level of abstraction

    • Same context of use

    • Across various contexts of use

  • Examples

    • Simple CUI adaptation: widget replacement

    • Design-time vs run-time adaptation

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 1 widget replacement 1

Example 1: widget replacement (1)

[Limbourg et al., 2004]

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>

<cuiModel name="MyModel">

<version modifDate="2004-03-24T17:09:17.402+01:00" xmlns="">7</version>

<authorName xmlns="">Youri</authorName>

<window height="500" width="600" name="Formulaire (2/5)" id="window_1">

<box relativeHeight="100" name="box1_0" id="box1_0">

<box type="vert" name="boxTodo" id="boxTodo">

...

<box type="horiz" name="box_2_2_2_1" id="box_2_2_2_1">

<textComponent defaultContent="Sexe" isBold="true" id="label_2"/>

<radioButton groupName=“grupo01" defaultContent="Femme"

defaultState="false" id="radiobutton_0"/>

<radioButton groupName="grupo01" defaultContent="Homme"

defaultState="true" id="radiobutton_1"/>

</box>

...

</box>

</box>

</window>

</cuiModel>

Excerpt for an usiXML CUI specification.

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 1 widget replacement 2

Example 1: widget replacement (2)

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 1 widget replacement 3

Example 1: widget replacement (3)

The UsiXML graph before applying any rule

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 1 widget replacement 4

Example 1: widget replacement (4)

[Limbourg et al., 2004]

Rule 1: Create a new comboBox with the same id and name as the name of the group of radioButtons.

NAC

RHS

LHS

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 1 widget replacement 5

Example 1: widget replacement (5)

Rule 1: Create a new comboBox with the same id and name as the name of the group of radioButtons.

The usiXML graph after aplying the first rule

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 1 widget replacement 6

Example 1: widget replacement (6)

[Limbourg et al., 2004]

Rule 2: Convert every radioButton within the group “x” into an item for the comboBox “x”, we have just created.

LHS

RHS

::=

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 1 widget replacement 7

Example 1: widget replacement (7)

Rule 2: Convert every radioButton within the group “x” into an item for the comboBox “x”, we have just created.

The usiXML graph after aplying the second rule

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 1 widget replacement 8

Example 1: widget replacement (8)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>

<cuiModel name="MyModel">

<version modifDate="2004-03-24T17:09:17.402+01:00" xmlns="">7</version>

<authorName xmlns="">Youri</authorName>

<window height="500" width="600" name="Formulaire (2/5)" id="window_1">

<box relativeHeight="100" name="box1_0" id="box1_0">

<box type="vert" name="boxTodo" id="boxTodo">

...

<box type="horiz" name="box_2_2_2_1" id="box_2_2_2_1">

<textComponent defaultContent="Sexe" isBold="true" id="label_2"/>

<comboBox id="comboBox001" name="label_3" isDropDown="true">

<item id="radiobutton_0" name="radiobutton_0" defaultContent="Femme"/>

<item id="radiobutton_1" name="radiobutton_1" defaultContent="Homme"/>

</comboBox>

...

</box>

</box>

</window>

</cuiModel>

Excerpt from the final transformated usiXML specification

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 1 widget replacement 9

Example 1: widget replacement (9)

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 2 adaptation

Example 2: Adaptation

  • Two forms of adaptation

    • Adaptability: user-initiated

    • Adaptivity: system-initiated

  • Four steps: user, system, third party, combination

    • Detection

    • Computation

    • Decision

    • Execution

  • 2 Adaptivity forms

    • UI remain the same: vectorial UIs

    • UI change at run-time: plastic UIs

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 2 plastic ui

Example 2: Plastic UI

[Grolaux, Van Roy, Vanderdonckt, 2002]

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 3 multimodal ui

Example 3: multimodal UI

[Stanciulescu, Limbourg, Michotte, Vanderdonckt, 2005]

  • Need for additional abstraction

  • Additional transformation rules

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Example 4 crazy uis

Example 4: Crazy UIs

[Molina, Vanderdonckt, Gonzalez, 2005]

  • Use the same model

    • for 3D UI: Cube

    • for migration across platforms in virtual reality: MigriXML

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


5 conclusion

5. Conclusion

  • A multi-path support of MDA

TransformiXML

IdealXML

FlashiXML

Rendering

UsiXML model:

Concrete user

interface

UsiXML

models: task,

domain

Graph

transformations

UsiXML model:

Abstract user

interface

Graph

transformations

Final user

interface

Generative

programming

VisualiXML

Derivation rules

KnowiXML

GrafiXML

VisiXML

SketchiXML

FormiXML

ReversiXML

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


5 conclusion1

5. Conclusion

  • Conceptual modeling of UIs

    • Separation of concerns is feasible

    • Correlability of models is required

    • It is possible to have multiple abstractions on demand

    • Not all models should be involved

    • Everything is in UsiXML

    • Extreme modeling or extreme engineering

      • Everything is in the model: relatively easy

      • Model-to-model transformation: harder

      • Model-to-code generation: hardest

  • Industrial practise

    • Multi-path development

    • Sketching of UI

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


Future trend sketching

Future trend: sketching?

[Coyette & Vanderdonckt, 2005]

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


I would like to dedicate this talk to

I would like to dedicate this talk to

  • Prof. Em. François Bodart (Univ. of Namur, BE) for

    • Inoculating me the virus of (meta-)modeling and structured design of information systems

    • Sharing with me his vision about user interfaces and interactive information systems

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


I would like to thank

I would like to thank

  • BCHI team members for their involvement and their constant effort in the UsiXML initiative among others

    • Laurent Bouillon: ReversiXML, UsiXML

    • Benoît Collignon: PlastiXML

    • Adrien Coyette: SketchiXML

    • Murielle Florins: Graceful degradation

    • Monica Gemo: multi-platform UIs and annotations

    • Juan Gonzalez: 3D UsiXML

    • Donatien Grolaux: detachable UIs, DistriXML

    • Josefina Guerrero: UIs for workflows

    • Quentin Limbourg: multi-path development, UsiXML, all tools

    • Céline Mariage: MetroWeb, guidelines

    • Benjamin Michotte: GrafiXML, TransformiXML, UsiXML

    • José Pascual Molina: MigriXML, VUIToolkit

    • Francisco Montero: IdealXML

    • Adrian Stanciulescu: ModaliXML, UsiXML

    • Daniela Trevisan: augmented reality

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


I would like to thank1

I would like to thank

  • João Falcão e Cunha, Oscar Pastor, Nuno Jardim Nunes

  • The CAiSE Advisory Committee

    • Janice Bubenko

    • Collette Roland

    • Arne Solvberg

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


And you for your attention

… and you for your attention

Free download and register

USer Interface eXtensible Language

http://www.usixml.org

SIMILAR, the European task force making

user interfaces similar to human-to-human communication

http://www.similar.cc

Home Page of BCHI Lab

http://www.isys.ucl.ac.be/bchi

CAiSE'2005 Keynote address - Porto, June 16, 2005


  • Login