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Science Content and Pacing Grade 8. Presented by Dr. Ava D. Rosales, Instructional Supervisor Mr. Eddie Bonet, Curriculum Support Specialist November 8, 2011. Welcome. Make a Name Tent and include: NAME SCHOOL One “aha” (eye-opening) moment that resulted from the Interim assessment .

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Science content and pacing grade 8

Science Content and Pacing Grade 8

Presented by

Dr. Ava D. Rosales, Instructional Supervisor

Mr. Eddie Bonet, Curriculum Support Specialist

November 8, 2011

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Welcome

Welcome

Make a Name Tent and include:

NAME

SCHOOL

One “aha” (eye-opening) moment that resulted from the Interim assessment



Outcomes goals
Outcomes/Goals

  • Model the importance of Planning

  • Facilitate movement from Engage to Explain in the 5-Es

  • Develop quality questioning techniques

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Norms
Norms

  • Participate Actively

  • Ask questions

  • Learn by doing

  • Set your own learning into action

    Bathroom and Electronic Devices


Planning for instruction science grades 6 8

Planning for InstructionScience Grades 6 - 8

A grant funded by the USDOE and awarded by the FLDOE Mathematics and Science Partnership Initiative. Presentation developed by Florida PROMiSE

Partnership to Rejuvenate and Optimize Mathematics and Science Education


Planning for instruction
Planning for Instruction

Just as an actor focuses on his script and a musician on the score, so must a teacher focus on a lesson plan.

Teaching Secondary School Mathematics: Techniques and Enrichment Units

Posamentier and Stepelman, 1995, p. 21


Planning for instruction1
Planning for Instruction

Why have lesson plans?


Why have lesson plans
Why have lesson plans?

  • To help teacher organize thoughts and materials needed for lesson (learning activity, teaching strategy, and assessment instrument).

  • To ensure that teacher actually teaches the required curriculum (including standards required by law).

  • To assist the teacher to become a more reflective decision maker.


Why have lesson plans1
Why have lesson plans?

The quality of the lessons you deliver is the essence of teaching.


What great lesson plans look like
What Great Lesson Plans Look Like

The best lessons contain a clear purpose, actively engage the students, cater to various learning styles, and challenge the students with higher level questions.


Levels of planning
Levels of Planning:

There are three levels of lesson planning:

  • Long-term planning

  • Short-term planning

  • Daily planning


Considerations when planning
Considerations when Planning

  • Subject content

  • Reading in the content area

  • Curriculum mapping

  • Integration of multiple subject areas

    What do you want students to know when they complete the day, semester, or year lesson(s)?


Considerations when planning1
Considerations when Planning

Science teachers also need to know how to plan for:

  • Laboratory activities

  • Teaching controversial issues such as evolution

  • Lab safety

  • The use of science-specific graphic organizers.


Instructional strategies
Instructional Strategies

  • How you teach is also an important consideration when planning.

  • Teachers tend to teach the way they were taught.

  • Different students learn different topics in different ways, so it is important to include a mix of teaching techniques in your lesson plans.


Instructional methods
Instructional Methods

How were you taught?

How do you think you

learn best?

What are some other instructional strategies that might have been used?


Using different instructional methods
Using Different Instructional Methods

  • Direct instruction

  • Cooperative learning groups

  • Inquiry (structured, guided, open)

  • Peer teaching

  • Concept maps / mindmaps

  • Learning centers

  • Problem / community based


Inquiry learning
Inquiry Learning

  • Some of most effective science lessons are based on inquiry learning, where the locus of control shifts from the teacher to the students.

  • Inquiry lessons lie on a continuum from structured to free.


Problem based learning pbl
Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

  • A real-world problem provides context and motivation for students to learn scientific content.

  • Learning is shaped by the student (inquiry) while the teacher acts as a guide, helping with content and metacognitive skills


Cooperative groups
Cooperative Groups

  • Cooperative groups can contribute to better comprehension, higher scores and higher satisfaction.

  • Group lessons must be well organized to be effective.

  • Group work is not simply an excuse for the teacher to do something else.

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Types of group work
Types of Group Work

  • Cooperative learning

  • Peer response

  • Think-pair-share

  • Discussion circles

  • Paired problem solving

  • Reciprocal teaching

  • Jigsaw

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Choosing group members
Choosing Group Members

  • Random—numbering off, matching pictures, etc

  • Purposeful—using set criteria, i.e., high/low achievers, male/female, etc.

    Studies have shown that diverse groups are best. It is also a good idea not to keep the same groups repeatedly.

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Lab roles
Lab roles

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Assigning roles
Assigning Roles

  • Leader / recorder / speaker / materials (go-getter)

  • Facilitator / recorder / reporter / data processor

    Other group roles may include tasks such as timer, illustrator and so on.

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Instructional methods review
Instructional Methods - Review

  • Remember, there is no “magic” new instructional method that will work in every situation.

  • Incorporate a variety of teaching methods into your lessons.

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Multiple intelligences
Multiple Intelligences

expectumf.umf.maine.edu

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Multiple intelligences1
Multiple Intelligences

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Short term or unit planning
Short-Term or Unit Planning

Short-term or unit plans:

  • Expand on one curriculum topic.

  • Developmentally sequence the topics of the unit.

  • Include content, teaching strategies, and assessment instruments.

  • Reflect the Next Generation Sunshine States Standards - Big Ideas and Benchmarks.

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Pacing Guide

SAMPLE UNIT PLAN

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Instructional planning
Instructional Planning

Developing an Effective Daily Lesson Plan

  • Plan for conceptual understanding.

  • Use discovery, collaborative, and inquiry learning.

  • Use authentic assessment that evaluates what you taught.

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Rationale for using the 5 e model
Rationale for Using the 5 E Model

  • The 5 Es model is an instructional model based on the constructivist approach to learning.

  • The 5 Es allows students and teachers to:

  • experience common activities

  • use and build on prior knowledge and experience

  • construct meaning

  • continually assess students’ conceptual understanding

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


The 5e model one effective approach
The 5E Model – One Effective Approach

Bybee, R. and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

See Bybee (1997) Achieving Science Literacy

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Engage
Engage

Questions to Stimulate Student Thinkingand Accountable Talk

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Questions to stimulate student thinking and accountable talk
Questions to Stimulate Student Thinkingand Accountable Talk

To encourage students' reasoning about mathematics and science, and to involve them in higher-order thinking processes, teachers must be adept at posing clarifying and provocative questions.

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs

Florida Curriculum Framework, p. 146


Questions to stimulate student thinking and accountable talk1
Questions to Stimulate Student Thinkingand Accountable Talk

Helping students work together to make sense

of mathematics or science:

  • "What do others think about what Sam said?"

  • "Do you agree? Disagree?"

  • "Does anyone have the same answer but a different way to explain it?"

  • "Would you ask the rest of the class that question?"

  • "Do you understand what they are saying?"

  • "Can you convince the rest of us that makes sense?"

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Questions to stimulate student thinking and accountable talk2
Questions to Stimulate Student Thinkingand Accountable Talk

Helping students to rely more on themselves to determine whether something is correct:

  • "Why do you think that?"

  • "Why is that true?"

  • "How did you reach that conclusion?"

  • "Does that make sense?“

  • "Can you make a model to show that?"

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Questions to stimulate student thinking and accountable talk3
Questions to Stimulate Student Thinkingand Accountable Talk

Helping students learn to reason:

  • "Does that always work?"

  • "Is that true of a counter example?"

  • "How would you support/demonstrate that?"

  • "What assumptions are you making?"

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Questions to stimulate student thinking and accountable talk4
Questions to Stimulate Student Thinkingand Accountable Talk

Helping students learn to conjecture, invent, and solve problems:

  • "What would happen if...?"

  • "Do you see a pattern?"

  • "What are some possibilities here?"

  • "Can you predict the next one? What about the last one?"

  • "How did you approach the problem?"

  • "What decision do you think he should make?"

  • "What is alike and what is different about your method of solution and hers?"

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Questions to stimulate student thinking and accountable talk5
Questions to Stimulate Student Thinkingand Accountable Talk

Helping students to make connections within the content, between content areas, and to the real world

  • "How does this relate to...?"

  • "What ideas that we have learned before were useful in solving the problem?"

  • "Have we ever solved a problem like this one before?"

  • "What uses of mathematics [science] did you find on the news/Internet/television last night?"

  • "Can you give me an example of ... in the real world?"

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


REMEMBER

Questions drive the inquiry process.

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


What are they thinking
What Are They Thinking?

What’s the difference between a

fish and a submarine?

One has lettuce and tomato and one has tarter sauce!

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Develop essential questions
Develop Essential Questions

Using

  • FCAT 2.0 Test Item Specs

  • Pacing Guide

  • Question Stem Worksheet

    Benchmarks:

  • SC.8.N.1.1; SC.8.N.1.6; SC.8.N.1.3; SC.8.N.1.4

  • SC.8.P.9.2 (AA); SC.8.P.8.1; SC.8.P.8.5 (AA)

    SC.8.P.9.1; SC.8.P.9.3

  • SC.8.L.18.4; SC.8.L.18.1; SC.8.L.18.2; SC.8.L.18.4;

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


The 5e model one effective approach1
The 5E Model – One Effective Approach

How will students’ interest be captured?

Make connections between what has been learned and what will be learned

Focus student thinking

Mental engagement

Bybee, R. and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

See Bybee (1997) Achieving Science Literacy

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


The 5e model one effective approach2
The 5E Model – One Effective Approach

What exploration experience will be used?

Provide common base of experiences

Identify and develop current concepts, processes, and skills through exploration of environment, materials, tools, etc.

Bybee, R. and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

See Bybee (1997) Achieving Science Literacy

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Explore inquiry hands on minds on
EXPLORE: Inquiry: Hands-on/Minds-on

Is a New Substance Formed? (Inquiry Warm-up)

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


The 5e model one effective approach3
The 5E Model – One Effective Approach

How will students communicate the results of their explorations?

Focus on particular aspects of the engagement and exploration

Students communicate conceptual understanding and demonstrate skills

Introduction of common language base

Bybee, R. and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

See Bybee (1997) Achieving Science Literacy

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Opportunities to reteach
Opportunities to Reteach

  • Review the inquiry activities and indicate opportunities to reteach and/or incorporate secondary benchmarks (REMEMBER Fair Game)

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Explore inquiry hands on minds on1
EXPLORE: Inquiry: Hands-on/Minds-on

  • Is a New Substance Formed? (Inquiry Warm-up)

  • Law of Conservation of Matter (CPALMS)

  • Are You Part of a Cycle? (Warm-up)

  • Following Water (Quick Lab)

  • Chapter 13 (Warm-up/Quick Lab Cluster)

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


The 5e model one effective approach4
The 5E Model – One Effective Approach

How will students communicate the results of their explorations?

Focus on particular aspects of the engagement and exploration

Students communicate conceptual understanding and demonstrate skills

Introduction of common language base

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs

Bybee, R. and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

See Bybee (1997) Achieving Science Literacy


The 5e model one effective approach5
The 5E Model – One Effective Approach

How will students apply their knowledge to a new situation?

Challenge and extend conceptual understanding

Practice skills and behaviors

Development of deeper and broader understanding

Bybee, R. and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

See Bybee (1997) Achieving Science Literacy

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


The 5e model one effective approach6
The 5E Model – One Effective Approach

How will students demonstrate their new understanding and skills?

Students assess their understanding and abilities

Opportunity for teacher to evaluate student progress toward achieving the educational objectives

Informs future instructional decisions and lesson plans

Bybee, R. and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

See Bybee (1997) Achieving Science Literacy

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


The 5e model one effective approach7
The 5E Model – One Effective Approach

Assessment takes

place at each

stage and informs

instructional decision-making.

Assess

Bybee, R. and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

See Bybee (1997) Achieving Science Literacy

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Resources for your lesson plan
Resources for Your Lesson Plan

Instructional materials

  • Manipulatives

  • Virtual technology

    References

  • Textbooks

  • Websites

  • Journals

  • Colleagues

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Blurring the Boundaries of CIA

Creates A FOCUS on the LEARNER

INSTRUCTION

CURRICULUM

How are we

going to

get them

to know it?

What do we

want kids to

Know and be

able to do?

ASSESSMENT

How are we

going to know

they know it?

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Ready…

Aim…

SHOOT!

Photos from worldofstock.com

Curriculum

Assessment

Instruction

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


What Do We Want Kids to Know?

Remember: Fair Game Principle and Opportunities to Embed

BOK – Life Science

Big Idea 18: Matter and Energy Transformations

SC.8.L.18.4 (AA); SC.8.L.18.1; SC.8.L.18.2; SC.8.L.18.4

BOK – Nature of Science

Big Idea 1: The Practice of Science

SC.8.N.1.1; SC.8.N.1.6; SC.8.N.1.3; SC.8.N.1.4 [Fair Game: SC.6.N.1.3; SC.7.N.1.3; SC.7.N.1.4]

BOK – Physical Science

Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter

SC.8.P.8.5 (AA); SC.8.P.8.1

Big Idea 9: Changes in Matter

SC.8.P.9.2 (AA); SC.8.P.9.1; SC.8.P.9.3

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs



How Are We Going to Know Academic Programs

They Know It?

Sample problem from 8th grade FCAT Sample Test

http://fcat.fldoe.org/fcat2/fcatitem.asp#download

Ethan is observing chemical and physical properties of a substance. He heats up a substance and observes that the substance turns from a brown solid to a black powder. He refers to several chemistry journals that claim this represents a chemical reaction. From his observation and research, he concludes that the substance goes through a chemical change when heated. How can Ethan best defend his conclusion?

A. by demonstrating that the substance will eventually melt if the temperature continues to increase

B. by verifying that the substance is now made up of different molecules than before it was heated

C. by verifying that the substance is made up of only one type of element

D. by demonstrating that the substance is less dense after it is heated

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


How Are We Going to Teach Academic Programs

Them so They Know It?

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Just as no performer enjoys playing the same role day in and day out, so no student enjoys sitting for the same type of lesson every day. It kills

initiative and dulls the imagination.

Variety is what makes the learning process, as well as the teaching aspect of that process, a pleasant one.

Teaching Secondary School Mathematics: Techniques and Enrichment Units

Posamentier and Stepelman, 1995, p. 21

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Where are we on the inquiry continuum
Where are We on the Inquiry Continuum day out, so no student enjoys sitting for the same type of lesson every day. It kills

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


Http flpromise org
http://flpromise.org day out, so no student enjoys sitting for the same type of lesson every day. It kills

M-DCPS Division of Mathematics, Science and Advanced Academic Programs


The science classroom essentials
The Science Classroom Essentials day out, so no student enjoys sitting for the same type of lesson every day. It kills

Contact information:

Dr. Ava D. Rosales, Instructional Supervisor

[email protected] 305-995-4537

Mr. Heriberto “ Eddie” Bonet, Curriculum Support Specialist

[email protected] 305-995-3136


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