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Providing Information Literacy Instruction to Graduate Students. Hannah Gascho Rempel Graduate Student Services Coordinator, Oregon State University OLA/WLA Conference April 18, 2008. Where We’re Headed Today. Who are our graduate students anyway?

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Providing information literacy instruction to graduate students

Providing Information Literacy Instruction to Graduate Students

Hannah Gascho Rempel

Graduate Student Services Coordinator,

Oregon State University

OLA/WLA Conference

April 18, 2008


Where we re headed today
Where We’re Headed Today Students

  • Who are our graduate students anyway?

  • What are their information literacy needs?

  • Some ideas for providing instructional services (Example – OSU Libraries)


Why focus on graduate students
Why Focus on Graduate Students? Students

  • Traditionally underserved

  • Future faculty

  • Part of our strategic direction

  • Personal interest


Who are they
Who Are They? Students



Grad student facts figures
Grad Student Facts & Figures Students

  • 13.9% of all students enrolled nationally(2001 – U.S. Dept. of Ed., Pontius & Harper, 2006)

OUS 2006 Factbook


Grad student facts figures1
Grad Student Facts & Figures Students

  • 28% are members of minority groups (U.S. citizens) – (In Oregon 10.6%)

    • 13% - African-Americans

    • 8% - Hispanic

    • 6% - Asian/Pacific Islander

    • 1% Native American

  • 16% are international students

Council of Graduate Schools, 2007


Grad student facts figures2
Grad Student Facts & Figures Students

  • 59% are female (65% at master’s-only institutions) – Oregon 58% F, 42% M

Council of Graduate Schools, 2007; OUS 2006 Factbook


Grad student facts figures3
Grad Student Facts & Figures Students

  • Oregon 58% F, 42% M

OUS 2006 Factbook


Grad student facts figures areas of study
Grad Student Facts & Figures StudentsAreas of Study

  • Education (74% female) and business (55% male) were the most popular disciplines

  • Health sciences is the fastest growing field

  • 53% of international students studied either engineering or sciences; only 16% of U.S. students did

Council of Graduate Schools, 2007


Grad student facts figures4
Grad Student Facts & Figures Students

  • Grad students are adults

OUS 2006 Factbook


Grad student facts figures5
Grad Student Facts & Figures Students

  • 33 – average age at dissertation completion (Brus, 2006)

  • 25% - have at least one minor dependent (U. of Iowa study, Brus, 2006)

  • Only at the largest doctoral universities did a majority (67%) attend full-time (CGS, 2007)

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Brus, 2006 Students


Brus, 2006 Students


Brus, 2006 Students


Grad student facts figures depressing facts
Grad Student Facts & Figures StudentsDepressing Facts

  • 49% of humanities students finish their dissertation in 10 years (as opposed to 63.8% of life science and 64.4% of engineering students)

  • 38% of humanities students finish at least $35K in debt vs. 12% of engineering and 18% of life science students

Council of Graduate Schools, 2007


Ph d completion factors
Ph.D. Completion Factors Students

  • 80% - financial support

  • 63% - mentoring/advising

  • 60% - family support

  • 39% - social environment & peer support

  • 39% - program quality

  • 30% - professional and career guidance

Council of Graduate Schools, 2007



Working with adult learners1
Working with Adult Learners Students

  • Adult learners bring their own learning preferences and needs

    • Expect to be accountable for more self-directed learning

    • Prefer learning through hands-on experience

    • Enjoy learning that addresses a specific problem

    • Typically have many more demands on their time, when compared with traditional-age students, due to family and work responsibilities.

  • (Dewald 1999; Ross-Gordon 2003)


Graduate student info seeking behaviors
Graduate Student Info Seeking Behaviors Students

  • Learn from their peers (Brown 2005; Kuruppu and Gruber 2006)

  • Lack of time impacts willingness to try new library tools and techniques (Parrish 1989; Sadler and Given 2007)

  • Primarily use journal articles rather than books (Chrzastowski and Joseph 2006)

  • Prefer electronic access (Chrzastowski and Joseph 2006)

  • Desire cross-database searching (Maughan 1999)

OSU Libraries


Graduate student needs
Graduate Student Needs Students

  • Increase information literacy skills

  • Space to study/research/ write/collaborate

  • Community to interact with (“Community of Scholars”)

cayce.vanhorn –

Auburn University Libraries

ARL/CNI Fall Forum 2007 Report


Why grad students are often underserved
Why Grad Students Are Often Underserved Students

  • The undergraduate population is so much bigger

  • Undergraduate student development arguably requires more attention and resources

  • The perception that academic programs and departments already meet the needs of grad students

  • Grad students are experienced students – know how to navigate the higher ed system

Pontius & Harper, 2006


Traditional barriers
Traditional Barriers Students

  • Assumptions about level of familiarity and knowledge

    • By librarians

    • By faculty

    • By students themselves

  • Lack of a traditional access point


Traditional service points
Traditional Service Points Students

  • Orientations

  • Tool-specific classes

  • Research consultations

  • Reference Desk

spencerselvidge


Creating a graduate student services program
Creating a Graduate Student Services Program Students

Departmental Shifts

Surveyed Student Needs

Appointed a Coordinator

Looked for the point of greatest impact

Chose an instructional style

Evaluated Workshop

Promoted Workshop

Expanded Options


Why the literature review
Why the Literature Review? Students

  • Survey results

  • Our own experiences as grad students (and librarians)

  • Common across departments

  • Specific, required information need

  • Great lead in for many IL competencies

    • Determining info needed, accessing, evaluating, incorporating, using effectively


Why a workshop
Why a Workshop? Students

  • Separate from a specific course

  • Broad reach

  • Interactive environment

  • Realistic post-school setting

  • Elements we included

    • Pre-registration, confirmation reminders, personalized packets, name tags, food and drink, seating, conversational tone, group work


Workshop promotion
Workshop Promotion Students

  • Find the most effective means for your setting

  • Try multiple avenues

    • Posters, handouts, emails from subject librarians, emails from grad advisors

  • Evaluate what actually worked


What we cover

Definition and purpose of the literature review Students

Communicating with your advisor

Comprehensiveness

Strategies for conducting a literature review

Learning how to read and recognize patterns in the literature

Effective database searching

Useful library services (e.g. interlibrary loan)

Organizing searches and results (e.g., saving searches, bibliographic management software)

Keeping up with the literature (RSS feeds, Table of Contents alerts, social bookmarking, search alerts)

Contacts for further help and participant evaluation of workshop

What We Cover


Evaluation
Evaluation Students

  • Pre-Assessment

    • Length of time at OSU?

    • Masters or Ph.D. student?

    • ILL use?

    • Summit use?

    • What article databases have you used?

    • What do you want to learn?






Evaluation post workshop
Evaluation – Post Workshop Students

  • Self-assessment of learning

  • Review of how we did

  • What they would like to learn in the future



Future areas to explore
Future areas to explore Students

  • Target specific audiences

    • international students, older than average students, or distance learners

  • Offer classes for a range of skill levels

  • Involve faculty

  • Increase thesis writing support for graduate students (based on requests on student evals)

    • Partner with writing center, academic departments to explore options

  • Make other library workshop offerings available to graduate students

  • Provide resources for grad students in their role as teachers and researchers (not just students)



Summary
Summary Students

  • Consider your audience

  • Create programs that meet a need


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