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Business English Program for Freshmen at ULIS-VNU-HN: Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders. Trần Thị Quỳnh Lê Trần Thị Thanh Phúc ULIS-VNU-HN. Contents. 1. 2. 3. The Business English Program at ULIS-VNU. Introduction. Evaluation of the assignments. Introduction: rationale.

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Business english program for freshmen at ulis vnu hn initial evaluation by the stakeholders

Business English Program for Freshmen at ULIS-VNU-HN: Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

TrầnThịQuỳnhLê

TrầnThịThanhPhúc

ULIS-VNU-HN


Contents
Contents Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

1

2

3

The Business English Program at ULIS-VNU

Introduction

Evaluation of the assignments


Introduction rationale
Introduction: rationale Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

The growing importance of English in business communication

The situation in ULIS – VNU

Aims of the paper:

Description of the BE speaking program in ULIS-VNU

Evaluation of the two assignments employed as formative assessment tools


Introduction literature review
Introduction: Literature review Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Curriculum

Kerr (1983): all learning planned and guided by the school

Evan (1995): a structured set of learning outcomes or tasks

OECD (1998): content, teaching, learning and resources

Two features:

Planned and guided learning

Schooling activities


Introduction literature review1
Introduction: Literature review Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Curriculum development

Tayler (1949):

Select aims, goals, objectives

Select learning experiences and content

Organize learning experiences

Evaluate of the achievements of objectives

Wiggins and McTighe (2005):

Identify desired results

Determine acceptable evidence

Plan learning experience


Introduction literature review2
Introduction: Literature review Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Curriculum evaluation

Tuckman (1979): means to determine whether the program is meeting its goals, whether the outcomes match the intended outcomes

The current BE speaking program comprises both:

Curriculum design (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005)

Curriculum evaluation


Introduction literature review3
Introduction: Literature review Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Assessment

Hanson (1993): representational technique

Messick (1989): validation of assessment

Forms:

Summative: encapsulates all the evidence to a given point (Maddalena, 2005)

Formative: compasses all activities to provide information to be used as feedback for modification of teaching and learning activities (Black, 1998)


The be speaking program
The BE speaking program Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Steps to design the program:

Identify the desired goals (knowledge, skills, attitudes)

Determine acceptable evidence

Two assignments

Final speaking test

Learning plan (working out the syllabus)

Collect data on the effectiveness of the program


The be speaking program1
The BE speaking program Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Core book:

Name: New Market Leader (Pre-intermediate) Second Edition by Cotton, David and Kent (2005)

Reasons for choosing:

Suitable level

Authentic input

Case study in each unit (review)

Supplementary material:

Name: Business Vocabulary in Use -Intermediate by Mascull (2002)

Reason for choosing: Business Vocabulary in Use -Intermediate by Mascull (2002

Explanation of key business terms

Build up vocabulary (Levelt 1989, Ota 2003)


The be speaking program2
The BE speaking program Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Assignments

Vocabulary mini-test: one test per two weeks, 10 minutes, 20-25 items

Semester 1: 50% from the two books, 50% from other BE books (low performance)

Semester 2: 50% from each book

Case-study: focus on discussion and presentation skills

Semester 1: adapted case study

Semester 2: no official adaptation

End of term speaking test (adapted from BEC Premilenary speaking test)


Evaluation of the two assignments
Evaluation of the two assignments Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Research questions:

i. How were the assignments received by the teachers and students?

ii, What are their suggestions in improving the assignments?

Instruments

Questionnaires (60 students, 5 teachers) about the effectiveness and their preference

Interviews (5 students, 2 teachers)

Procedure

Questionnaire completion (60 randomly selected students and 5 teachers who taught the program)

Interview: 2 teachers and 5 students


Evaluation of the two assignments1
Evaluation of the two assignments Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Findings: How were the assignments received by the teachers and students?

The effectiveness of the case studies – Students’ feedback


Evaluation of the two assignments2
Evaluation of the two assignments Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Findings: How were the assignments received by the teachers and students?

Comments on case study (CS):

T1: prefers the CS of semester 1

Most Ss: prefers the CS of semester 1

Reasons: more suitable for Ss’ level, more close to the Ss, Ss have more to say

Ss: favor CS that invited discussion and argument from the audience

The effectiveness of the case studies – Students’ feedback


Evaluation of the two assignments3
Evaluation of the two assignments Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Findings: How were the assignments received by the teachers and students?

The effectiveness of the mini-test – Students’ feedback


Evaluation of the two assignments4
Evaluation of the two assignments Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Findings: How were the assignments received by the teachers and students?

Comments on vocabulary mini-test (VT):

Make Ss learn more

Help Ss re-check business vocabulary

Ss may forget what they learn

Ss favor VT in semester 2 (only from the assigned books)

Level: not appropriate (too difficult in semester 1 while very predictable in semester 2)


Evaluation of the two assignments5
Evaluation of the two assignments Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Suggestions for CS:

Contextualize CS:

More assessable

Related to the real world of work

Same situation and complex language with minor change

More work on CS before going to class

Fewer CS for Ss to have better preparation

Suggestions for VT:

Better design

Some focus on pronunciation

More time to deal with the vocabulary


Evaluation of the two assignments implications
Evaluation of the two assignments Initial Evaluation by the stakeholdersImplications

CS promotes speaking skills.

CS work well when being practical and familiar.

Ss need to be exposed to unfamiliar situations.

More exploitation of input is necessary.

Ss and Ts use Internet to adapt CS.

More speaking elements should be employed in the VT.

Ss must have more opportunities to use the items in the VT.


Limitation and suggestion for further research
Limitation and suggestion Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders for further research

Broader scale

Comparison between the current program and other BE programs at other universities

More comments from other researchers


References
REFERENCES Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders

Black, P. & William, D. (1998) Assessment and Classroom Learning, Assessment in Education 5(1) pp 7-74

Cotton, D., David, F. & Kent, S. (2005) Market – Leader (Pre-intermediate_New Edition) Student's Book), Pearson Education Limited

Howell, K.W. & Evan, D.G. (1995) Must instructionally useful performance assessment be based in the curriculum? Comment. Exceptional Children, 61 (4), pp 394-396

Hanson, F.A. (1993) Testing Testing: Social Consequences of the Examined Life. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Kelly, A. V. (1983; 1999) The Curriculum. Theory and practice 4e, London: Paul Chapman

Levelt, W.J.M. (1989) Speaking: From intention to articulation, MA: MIT Press

Mascull, B. (2002) Business Vocabulary in Use, Cambridge University Press

Messick, S. (1989) Validity, In R.L.Linn (Ed.), Educational Measurement (3rd ed.), Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press, pp 13-103

Nomura, M. (2004) Enhancement of speaking ability and vocabulary: Using an archaeological research method, Naruto English Education, 18, 60-71. Naruto University of Education, Department of English

OECD. (1998) Making the Curriculum Work, Paris: Centre for Educational Research and Innovation, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development

Ota, H., Kanatani, K., Kosuge, A., & Hidai, S. (2003) How English ability is developed: Exploring English acquisition process of junior high school students, Tokyo: Taishukan

Taras, M. (2005) Assessment – Summative and Formative – Some Theoretical Reflections, British Journal of Educational Studies, ISSN 0007-1005, Vol.53, pp 466-478

Tuckman, B.W. (1979) Evaluating Instructional Programmes, Boton/London: Allyn & Bacon Inc.

Tyler, R.W. (1949) Basic principles of curriculum and instruction, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (2005) Understanding by design, Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development


Appendix 1 identify the desired goals
Appendix 1: Identify the desired goals Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders


Appendix 2 semester 1 vocabulary mini test 1 part 1
Appendix 2: Semester 1 Initial Evaluation by the stakeholdersvocabulary mini-test 1 (part 1)


Appendix 2 semester 1 vocabulary mini test 1 part 2
Appendix 2: Semester 1 Initial Evaluation by the stakeholdersvocabulary mini-test 1 (part 2)


Appendix 3 semester 2 vocabulary mini test 1 part 1
Appendix 3: Semester 2 Initial Evaluation by the stakeholdersvocabulary mini-test 1 (part 1)


Appendix 3 semester 2 vocabulary mini test 1 part 2
Appendix 3: Semester 2 Initial Evaluation by the stakeholdersvocabulary mini-test 1 (part 2)


Appendix 4 case study 2 part 1 in the core book
Appendix 4: Case-study 2 (part 1) Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders(in the core book)


Appendix 4 case study 2 part 2 in the core book
Appendix 4: Case-study 2 (part 2) Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders(in the core book)


Appendix 4 case study 2 part 3 in the core book
Appendix 4: Case-study 2 (part 3) Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders(in the core book)


Appendix 5 case study 2 adapted
Appendix 5: Case-study 2 - adapted Initial Evaluation by the stakeholders


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