BETTER CONNECTIONS    BETTER OUTCOMES

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Origins of the workshops. DEEWR undertakes a range of research and analysis of labour supply and skill shortages DEEWR, with other Government agencies, is looking at how to address Australia's labour supply and skill shortages Run a series of workshops to share information and ideas. Objective

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BETTER CONNECTIONS BETTER OUTCOMES

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1. NSW STATE OFFICE Welcome and thank you for coming. I would like to begin by paying my respects and acknowledging the Gandangara people (pronounced Gan-da-gar-ra) who are traditional owners of this land on which we meet today. It is good to see representatives here today from a wide range of organisations. The Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) runs in excess of 30 Better Connections workshops around Australia a year. These workshops provide us with a good opportunity to discuss the local labour market. We look forward to hearing your views on issues affecting the local area and to look at ways to work collectively towards addressing these issues. NSW STATE OFFICE Welcome and thank you for coming. I would like to begin by paying my respects and acknowledging the Gandangara people (pronounced Gan-da-gar-ra) who are traditional owners of this land on which we meet today. It is good to see representatives here today from a wide range of organisations. The Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) runs in excess of 30 Better Connections workshops around Australia a year. These workshops provide us with a good opportunity to discuss the local labour market. We look forward to hearing your views on issues affecting the local area and to look at ways to work collectively towards addressing these issues.

2. NSW STATE OFFICE Origins: The Department undertakes a range of research and analysis in relation to the labour market. The workshops provide an opportunity to share some of this information with people who can make things happen on the ground and use it in a practical way. Almost every day you open up a newspaper you see an article about skill shortages in a particular industry. The Department undertakes a lot of work in relation to skill shortages, education and training and is well placed to examine the issue in a holistic way (particularly in relation to vocational education and training). The Department also works with a range of other agencies including the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (in relation to its skilled migration programme) and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development, State Government and Local Government and organisations. Running a series of workshops in specific locations was identified as one way in which we could share some of this work and use it as a basis for identifying issues, opportunities and linkages relevant to a local area. In many cases this involves tapping into some of the work that is already underway in the local area. NSW STATE OFFICE Origins: The Department undertakes a range of research and analysis in relation to the labour market. The workshops provide an opportunity to share some of this information with people who can make things happen on the ground and use it in a practical way. Almost every day you open up a newspaper you see an article about skill shortages in a particular industry. The Department undertakes a lot of work in relation to skill shortages, education and training and is well placed to examine the issue in a holistic way (particularly in relation to vocational education and training). The Department also works with a range of other agencies including the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (in relation to its skilled migration programme) and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development, State Government and Local Government and organisations. Running a series of workshops in specific locations was identified as one way in which we could share some of this work and use it as a basis for identifying issues, opportunities and linkages relevant to a local area. In many cases this involves tapping into some of the work that is already underway in the local area.

3. The objective of the workshops is to: Develop local strategies to address local labour supply and skill shortage issues Increase labour market participation for the target groups – mature aged, parents, people with a disability, Indigenous Australians, long-term unemployed, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and youth Establish and further develop linkages between relevant organisations Actively support social inclusion of local residents: The Government’s social inclusion agenda aims to focus on the task of building social inclusion. Social exclusion is the outcome of people or communities suffering from a range of problems such as lack of education, unemployment, low incomes, poor housing, crime, poor health and disability and family breakdown. It focuses on those who, at a time of prosperity, remain disadvantaged. To be socially included, all Australians must be given the opportunity to secure a job; access services; connect with others in life (through family, friends, work, personal interests and local community); deal with personal crisis (such as ill health, bereavement or the loss of a job). Using ‘Place-Based Strategies’ to address local issues: The Government is developing an innovative approach to improving mainstream service delivery to local communities. Mainstream services are intended to be accessible and meet the needs of all Australians and ineffective service delivery and barriers to access of mainstream services can create further problems for people and communities. To give you a feel for the activities relating to some of the other workshops I’ll just give a few brief examples of the sorts of work that has resulted from previous Better Connections workshops: Employment and training projects for highly disadvantaged job seekers, including prevocational training and work placement pilots. Employer forums for local businesses. Greater networking by service providers, community organisations and other key players in the area. Australian Apprenticeship pilots. Career and employment expos. Try-a-trade expos with local TAFE colleges. The most successful activities are those that had strong commitment from all the key players in the local area.The objective of the workshops is to: Develop local strategies to address local labour supply and skill shortage issues Increase labour market participation for the target groups – mature aged, parents, people with a disability, Indigenous Australians, long-term unemployed, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and youth Establish and further develop linkages between relevant organisations Actively support social inclusion of local residents: The Government’s social inclusion agenda aims to focus on the task of building social inclusion. Social exclusion is the outcome of people or communities suffering from a range of problems such as lack of education, unemployment, low incomes, poor housing, crime, poor health and disability and family breakdown. It focuses on those who, at a time of prosperity, remain disadvantaged. To be socially included, all Australians must be given the opportunity to secure a job; access services; connect with others in life (through family, friends, work, personal interests and local community); deal with personal crisis (such as ill health, bereavement or the loss of a job). Using ‘Place-Based Strategies’ to address local issues: The Government is developing an innovative approach to improving mainstream service delivery to local communities. Mainstream services are intended to be accessible and meet the needs of all Australians and ineffective service delivery and barriers to access of mainstream services can create further problems for people and communities. To give you a feel for the activities relating to some of the other workshops I’ll just give a few brief examples of the sorts of work that has resulted from previous Better Connections workshops: Employment and training projects for highly disadvantaged job seekers, including prevocational training and work placement pilots. Employer forums for local businesses. Greater networking by service providers, community organisations and other key players in the area. Australian Apprenticeship pilots. Career and employment expos. Try-a-trade expos with local TAFE colleges. The most successful activities are those that had strong commitment from all the key players in the local area.

4. NSW STATE OFFICE Welcome and Introductions Better Connections presentation – Peter Frankis, Acting Branch Manager, Industry Strategies Branch, will provide the workshop presentation which includes a range of local demographic and labour market information to give a good profile of the region and form the basis for discussion. Discussion of main themes and issues – we will be looking for ideas and opportunities to better connect labour demand and supply in your local area. Identification of potential strategies – this section of the workshop will focus on labour market issues that can be realistically addressed at the local level by utilising existing resources and programs. Next steps and future directions – collectively we would like to come away today with some clear actions and an idea of who is doing what and when. I’m sure many of you have attended workshops in the past where there have been lots of ideas and discussion of issues but not much happens after the event – we hope to avoid that. Networking lunch – we’d like you all to stay and join us for lunch where you will have the opportunity to further network with other local organisations. Employment Service Provider session - after lunch, we’ve invited our contracted service providers to stay for one final session. It is also worth mentioning that we see DEEWR’s role as that of information sharing. In some cases we may be required to act as a catalyst for some initiatives – but the aim is for responsibility and ownership of an action plan to be taken at the local level. Thank you. I would now like to introduce Peter Frankis to give the workshop presentation. NSW STATE OFFICE Welcome and Introductions Better Connections presentation – Peter Frankis, Acting Branch Manager, Industry Strategies Branch, will provide the workshop presentation which includes a range of local demographic and labour market information to give a good profile of the region and form the basis for discussion. Discussion of main themes and issues – we will be looking for ideas and opportunities to better connect labour demand and supply in your local area. Identification of potential strategies – this section of the workshop will focus on labour market issues that can be realistically addressed at the local level by utilising existing resources and programs. Next steps and future directions – collectively we would like to come away today with some clear actions and an idea of who is doing what and when. I’m sure many of you have attended workshops in the past where there have been lots of ideas and discussion of issues but not much happens after the event – we hope to avoid that. Networking lunch – we’d like you all to stay and join us for lunch where you will have the opportunity to further network with other local organisations. Employment Service Provider session - after lunch, we’ve invited our contracted service providers to stay for one final session. It is also worth mentioning that we see DEEWR’s role as that of information sharing. In some cases we may be required to act as a catalyst for some initiatives – but the aim is for responsibility and ownership of an action plan to be taken at the local level. Thank you. I would now like to introduce Peter Frankis to give the workshop presentation.

5. This is a map of the Fairfield-Liverpool Employment Service Area (ESA) and this is the region that we will be looking at today. The Fairfield-Liverpool ESA consists of 2 Local Government Areas (LGA). Fairfield LGA is home to a mix of large industrial estates, major business and retail centres as well as residential areas. Income levels for Fairfield are generally lower than average for Australia, and unemployment is generally higher. The Liverpool LGA is more of a residential area, and is located close to the M5 and M7 highways. Income levels in Liverpool are on par with the Sydney metropolitan area, and unemployment is generally lower compared with Fairfield. (Sources: Fairfield City Council website, City Profile [http://www.fairfieldcity.nsw.gov.au/default.asp?iNavCatID=45&iSubCatID=168] and Liverpool City Council website, About Liverpool and our community [http://www.liverpool.nsw.gov.au/ourcity/aboutliverpoolandourcommunity.htm]) -------------------------------- The Fairfield-Liverpool ESA is made up of the following Statistical Local Areas (SLA) concordances: Proportion (%) of SLA in ESA Fairfield - East 97.13 Fairfield - West 100 Liverpool - East 100 Liverpool - West 96.17 Camden 16.38 (The following SLA’s have less than 1/8th in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA) Bankstown - North-West 7.18 Campbelltown - South 0.43 Holroyd 2.75 Penrith - East 0.83 Sutherland Shire - West 0.62 This is a map of the Fairfield-Liverpool Employment Service Area (ESA) and this is the region that we will be looking at today. The Fairfield-Liverpool ESA consists of 2 Local Government Areas (LGA). Fairfield LGA is home to a mix of large industrial estates, major business and retail centres as well as residential areas. Income levels for Fairfield are generally lower than average for Australia, and unemployment is generally higher. The Liverpool LGA is more of a residential area, and is located close to the M5 and M7 highways. Income levels in Liverpool are on par with the Sydney metropolitan area, and unemployment is generally lower compared with Fairfield. (Sources: Fairfield City Council website, City Profile [http://www.fairfieldcity.nsw.gov.au/default.asp?iNavCatID=45&iSubCatID=168] and Liverpool City Council website, About Liverpool and our community [http://www.liverpool.nsw.gov.au/ourcity/aboutliverpoolandourcommunity.htm]) -------------------------------- The Fairfield-Liverpool ESA is made up of the following Statistical Local Areas (SLA) concordances: Proportion (%) of SLA in ESA Fairfield - East 97.13 Fairfield - West 100 Liverpool - East 100 Liverpool - West 96.17 Camden 16.38 (The following SLA’s have less than 1/8th in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA) Bankstown - North-West 7.18 Campbelltown - South 0.43 Holroyd 2.75 Penrith - East 0.83 Sutherland Shire - West 0.62

6. This is a broad profile of the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA. Working Age Population (15-64) (Source: ABS Estimated Resident Population, June 2006) In the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA there is a total adult population (15+) of around 285,100 and a working age population (those aged between 15 and 64 years) of around 249,700 or 87.6 per cent of the adult population. This proportion is higher than for New South Wales (83.2 per cent) and Australia overall (83.9 per cent). The Fairfield-Liverpool ESA is home to a slightly young average population. People aged between 25–44 accounted for 39 per cent of the adult population, which is 2 percentage points higher compared with New South Wales and Australia (37% each). Participation and Unemployment Rates (Source: ABS Labour Force Data) The labour force is comprised of both employed and unemployed individuals. The participation rate is defined as the percentage of a total population who are in the labour force. The 12 month average to February 2008 for the overall labour force participation rate for the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA was 61.3 per cent which was 3.8 percentage points lower than the national participation rate (65.1 per cent). The participation rate among individuals approaching retirement (that is, in the 45 to 64 years age bracket) is lower in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA (64.8 per cent) than the national average (71.9 per cent). It may be inferred from this data that the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA has a high proportion of retirees in this age group. Over the past few years (Mar qtr 2002 to Dec qtr 2007), the unemployment rate in Fairfield has been significantly higher that the unemployment rate in Liverpool. For the December quarter 2007, the unemployment rate in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA (7.1 per cent) was much higher than the State (4.8 per cent) and the national averages (4.4 per cent) (Source: DEEWR Small Area Labour Markets, Australia, December Quarter 2007). The Fairfield SLA has the highest unemployment rate in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, 9.3 per cent compared with 6.1 per cent for the Liverpool SLA. There is a higher unemployment rate for persons aged 15-24, 13.8 per cent compared with 9.4 per cent for Australia as a whole. (Source: Labour Force Data, 12 month average to December 2007). In addition the participation rate for persons aged 15-24 is considerable lower, 60.6 per cent compared with 70.8 per cent for Australia as a whole. (Source: Centrelink Administrative data, March 2008 and ABS 2006 Census) As a consequence of the higher than average unemployment in the area, the proportion of the working age population receiving Centrelink allowances in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA was higher than for Australia overall. As at march 2008, around 23.6 per cent of the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA working age population (59,000 people) were in receipt of a Centrelink benefit, which was considerably higher than the comparable rate for NSW and Australia overall (16.9 per cent and 16.7 per cent respectively). Education (Source: 2006 Census) In the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, the proportion of the adult population who had completed Year 12 education (39.9per cent) was lower than the State average (42.4 per cent) and national average (42.2 per cent). The proportion of the adult population who had completed a Diploma or Certificate level of qualification in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA was 20.8 per cent, this is lower than the proportion within Australia overall (23.8 per cent). Diversity (Source: 2006 Census) As at 2006, there was a much larger proportion of the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA population born overseas (44.3 per cent) compared with NSW (23.8 per cent) and Australia (22.2 per cent). In addition, 56 per cent of the adult population, or almost 200,000 people (aged 15+) spoke a language other than English at home, compared with 16 per cent for Australia overall. Settlements (Source: Department of Immigration & Citizenship Settlements database: 2003–2007 data) Between 2003–2007, 17 500 people born overseas settled in the Fairfield-Liverpool Local Government Areas (LGAs). Over this period, almost half (48%) arrived on a family visa, one-third arrived on a humanitarian visa, and the remainder (18%) arrived on a skill based visa. The countries with the largest population of new arrivals include Iraq (5005 people, or 29% of settlements), Vietnam (2398 or 14%), Fiji (1094 or 6%), and Indonesia (1081 or 6%). Almost three-quarters (72% or 4247 persons) of all humanitarian settlement in this area arrived from Iraq. Indigenous (Source: 2006 Census) At the time of the 2006 Census, around 2000 people aged 15+ in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA identified themselves as Indigenous, accounting for 0.7 per cent of the adult population in the region. (1.7 per cent of the Australian adult population identified as Indigenous). In the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, the Indigenous unemployment rate (17.2 per cent) was slightly lower than the State Indigenous unemployment rate (19.3 per cent) and higher than the national unemployment rate for Indigenous people (15.6 per cent). The Indigenous participation rate in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA (51.8 per cent) is slightly higher than the State and national rates (51.2 per cent for both). ------------------------ Settlements: Fairfield & Liverpool Local Government Areas, past five calendar years (2003–2007, inclusive) By visa category Number Proportion of settlements Family 8453 48% Humanitarian 5921 34% Skill 3156 18% Total 17534 100% By Country of Birth Number Proportion of settlements Iraq 5005 29% Viet Nam 2398 14% Fiji 1094 6% Indonesia 1081 6% This is a broad profile of the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA. Working Age Population (15-64) (Source: ABS Estimated Resident Population, June 2006) In the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA there is a total adult population (15+) of around 285,100 and a working age population (those aged between 15 and 64 years) of around 249,700 or 87.6 per cent of the adult population. This proportion is higher than for New South Wales (83.2 per cent) and Australia overall (83.9 per cent). The Fairfield-Liverpool ESA is home to a slightly young average population. People aged between 25–44 accounted for 39 per cent of the adult population, which is 2 percentage points higher compared with New South Wales and Australia (37% each). Participation and Unemployment Rates (Source: ABS Labour Force Data) The labour force is comprised of both employed and unemployed individuals. The participation rate is defined as the percentage of a total population who are in the labour force. The 12 month average to February 2008 for the overall labour force participation rate for the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA was 61.3 per cent which was 3.8 percentage points lower than the national participation rate (65.1 per cent). The participation rate among individuals approaching retirement (that is, in the 45 to 64 years age bracket) is lower in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA (64.8 per cent) than the national average (71.9 per cent). It may be inferred from this data that the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA has a high proportion of retirees in this age group. Over the past few years (Mar qtr 2002 to Dec qtr 2007), the unemployment rate in Fairfield has been significantly higher that the unemployment rate in Liverpool. For the December quarter 2007, the unemployment rate in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA (7.1 per cent) was much higher than the State (4.8 per cent) and the national averages (4.4 per cent) (Source: DEEWR Small Area Labour Markets, Australia, December Quarter 2007). The Fairfield SLA has the highest unemployment rate in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, 9.3 per cent compared with 6.1 per cent for the Liverpool SLA. There is a higher unemployment rate for persons aged 15-24, 13.8 per cent compared with 9.4 per cent for Australia as a whole. (Source: Labour Force Data, 12 month average to December 2007). In addition the participation rate for persons aged 15-24 is considerable lower, 60.6 per cent compared with 70.8 per cent for Australia as a whole. (Source: Centrelink Administrative data, March 2008 and ABS 2006 Census) As a consequence of the higher than average unemployment in the area, the proportion of the working age population receiving Centrelink allowances in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA was higher than for Australia overall. As at march 2008, around 23.6 per cent of the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA working age population (59,000 people) were in receipt of a Centrelink benefit, which was considerably higher than the comparable rate for NSW and Australia overall (16.9 per cent and 16.7 per cent respectively). Education (Source: 2006 Census) In the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, the proportion of the adult population who had completed Year 12 education (39.9per cent) was lower than the State average (42.4 per cent) and national average (42.2 per cent). The proportion of the adult population who had completed a Diploma or Certificate level of qualification in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA was 20.8 per cent, this is lower than the proportion within Australia overall (23.8 per cent). Diversity (Source: 2006 Census) As at 2006, there was a much larger proportion of the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA population born overseas (44.3 per cent) compared with NSW (23.8 per cent) and Australia (22.2 per cent). In addition, 56 per cent of the adult population, or almost 200,000 people (aged 15+) spoke a language other than English at home, compared with 16 per cent for Australia overall. Settlements (Source: Department of Immigration & Citizenship Settlements database: 2003–2007 data) Between 2003–2007, 17 500 people born overseas settled in the Fairfield-Liverpool Local Government Areas (LGAs). Over this period, almost half (48%) arrived on a family visa, one-third arrived on a humanitarian visa, and the remainder (18%) arrived on a skill based visa. The countries with the largest population of new arrivals include Iraq (5005 people, or 29% of settlements), Vietnam (2398 or 14%), Fiji (1094 or 6%), and Indonesia (1081 or 6%). Almost three-quarters (72% or 4247 persons) of all humanitarian settlement in this area arrived from Iraq. Indigenous (Source: 2006 Census) At the time of the 2006 Census, around 2000 people aged 15+ in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA identified themselves as Indigenous, accounting for 0.7 per cent of the adult population in the region. (1.7 per cent of the Australian adult population identified as Indigenous). In the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, the Indigenous unemployment rate (17.2 per cent) was slightly lower than the State Indigenous unemployment rate (19.3 per cent) and higher than the national unemployment rate for Indigenous people (15.6 per cent). The Indigenous participation rate in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA (51.8 per cent) is slightly higher than the State and national rates (51.2 per cent for both). ------------------------ Settlements: Fairfield & Liverpool Local Government Areas, past five calendar years (2003–2007, inclusive) By visa category Number Proportion of settlements Family 8453 48% Humanitarian 5921 34% Skill 3156 18% Total 17534 100% By Country of Birth Number Proportion of settlements Iraq 5005 29% Viet Nam 2398 14% Fiji 1094 6% Indonesia 1081 6%

7. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Background (Source: 2006 Census) At the time of the 2006 Census, almost 44.3% of the population in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA was born overseas. This was almost twice as high as the proportion of people born overseas in both New South Wales (24 per cent) and Australia (22 per cent). In addition, it is important to note that 40.9% of the population in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA was born in a non-English speaking country, compared with 16.8% for New South Wales and 13.8% for Australia. At the time of the 2006 Census, the unemployment rate for the people in the Fairfield-Liverpool statistical region born overseas was 10.4%, compared to 6.8% of people in the region who were Australian-born and 8.9% for Fairfield-Liverpool overall. At the time of the 2006 Census, the overall labour force participation rate for Fairfield-Liverpool Statistical Region was 50%. The participation rate for overseas-born residents was 48% compared with 60% for Australian-born residents. Men born overseas and living in Fairfield-Liverpool had a higher labour force participation rate (59%) than overseas-born women (38%). Participation rates for Australian born men and women in Fairfield-Liverpool were higher than their overseas-born counterparts (66.5% and 54% respectively) Again, residents born in non-English speaking countries had a lower labour force participation rate (47%) than residents born in English speaking countries (57%) At the time of the 2006 Census, the working-age profile of people from a culturally or linguistically diverse background in the Fairfield-Liverpool region was different to that of the population born in Australia. Notably, a significantly greater proportion of overseas-born people were approaching retirement age (45-64 years) 42% compared with 23% of Australian-born residents. A person’s labour force status within the population of people born overseas varied depending on the person’s gender, whether they were born in a non-English speaking country and length of time spent in Australia. Unemployment rates were generally higher for overseas-born women (12%) than men (9%) in Fairfield-Liverpool Likewise, unemployment rates for people born in a non-English speaking country (11%) were higher than those born in an English-speaking country (7%) The unemployment rate for all people born overseas in a non-English speaking country for those who arrived between 2006–10 was 10.5% compared with 5.5% for those who arrived between 2001–2005 and 5.3% for those who arrived in 1991–1995 (Source: ABS labour force data, 12 month average to Feb 2008). Speaking English (Source: 2006 Census) For many overseas born people, their English language ability becomes better the longer they live in Australia. For example, of the overseas born people who spoke a language other than English and arrived in Fairfield-Liverpool in 2006 (almost 2,000 people), under half (46%) could speak English well or very well. For those who had lived in Australia for a few years (arrived in 2004), the proportion increased to 61%. This proportion rose again to 67% by the time they had spent four years in Australia (arrived in 2002). The Fairfield-Liverpool ESA is home to the largest number of people that speak a language other than English at home (199 500 people) across all ESA’s in Australia. At the time of the 2006 Census, 56% of all people in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA spoke a language other than English at home. (Canterbury/Bankstown had the same proportion (56%) but lower number of speakers (152 400), and Torres Strait Islands had the highest overall proportion of people who spoke a language other than English (72% or 6 900 persons, and they spoke and Indigenous language). Languages other than English, most commonly spoken at home in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA were: Vietnamese 11% Arabic 7%, and Italian, Spanish and Cantonese, 4% each. ----------------------------------------------------------------- ABS Labour Force Data: Unemployment rate by year of arrival in Australia, all Australia (12 month average to February 2008) Country 1991–95 1996–2000 2001–05 2006–2010 ( Main English-speaking country 5.5% 2.9% 3.0% 6.0% Other than M.E.S. country 5.2% 6.3% 6.9% 13.1% ABS Labour Force Data: Participation rate by year of arrival in Australia, all Australia (12 month average to February 2008) Country 1991–95* 1996–2000 2001–05 2006–2010 Main English-speaking country 78.3% 78.1% 80.5% 76.5% Other than M.E.S. country 65.4% 66.8% 64.4% 56.7% * Many people who arrived between 1991–1995 would have spent between 13–17 years in the Australian labour force, and would now be approaching retirement age.Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Background (Source: 2006 Census) At the time of the 2006 Census, almost 44.3% of the population in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA was born overseas. This was almost twice as high as the proportion of people born overseas in both New South Wales (24 per cent) and Australia (22 per cent). In addition, it is important to note that 40.9% of the population in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA was born in a non-English speaking country, compared with 16.8% for New South Wales and 13.8% for Australia. At the time of the 2006 Census, the unemployment rate for the people in the Fairfield-Liverpool statistical region born overseas was 10.4%, compared to 6.8% of people in the region who were Australian-born and 8.9% for Fairfield-Liverpool overall. At the time of the 2006 Census, the overall labour force participation rate for Fairfield-Liverpool Statistical Region was 50%. The participation rate for overseas-born residents was 48% compared with 60% for Australian-born residents. Men born overseas and living in Fairfield-Liverpool had a higher labour force participation rate (59%) than overseas-born women (38%). Participation rates for Australian born men and women in Fairfield-Liverpool were higher than their overseas-born counterparts (66.5% and 54% respectively) Again, residents born in non-English speaking countries had a lower labour force participation rate (47%) than residents born in English speaking countries (57%) At the time of the 2006 Census, the working-age profile of people from a culturally or linguistically diverse background in the Fairfield-Liverpool region was different to that of the population born in Australia. Notably, a significantly greater proportion of overseas-born people were approaching retirement age (45-64 years) 42% compared with 23% of Australian-born residents. A person’s labour force status within the population of people born overseas varied depending on the person’s gender, whether they were born in a non-English speaking country and length of time spent in Australia. Unemployment rates were generally higher for overseas-born women (12%) than men (9%) in Fairfield-Liverpool Likewise, unemployment rates for people born in a non-English speaking country (11%) were higher than those born in an English-speaking country (7%) The unemployment rate for all people born overseas in a non-English speaking country for those who arrived between 2006–10 was 10.5% compared with 5.5% for those who arrived between 2001–2005 and 5.3% for those who arrived in 1991–1995 (Source: ABS labour force data, 12 month average to Feb 2008). Speaking English (Source: 2006 Census) For many overseas born people, their English language ability becomes better the longer they live in Australia. For example, of the overseas born people who spoke a language other than English and arrived in Fairfield-Liverpool in 2006 (almost 2,000 people), under half (46%) could speak English well or very well. For those who had lived in Australia for a few years (arrived in 2004), the proportion increased to 61%. This proportion rose again to 67% by the time they had spent four years in Australia (arrived in 2002). The Fairfield-Liverpool ESA is home to the largest number of people that speak a language other than English at home (199 500 people) across all ESA’s in Australia. At the time of the 2006 Census, 56% of all people in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA spoke a language other than English at home. (Canterbury/Bankstown had the same proportion (56%) but lower number of speakers (152 400), and Torres Strait Islands had the highest overall proportion of people who spoke a language other than English (72% or 6 900 persons, and they spoke and Indigenous language). Languages other than English, most commonly spoken at home in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA were: Vietnamese 11% Arabic 7%, and Italian, Spanish and Cantonese, 4% each. ----------------------------------------------------------------- ABS Labour Force Data: Unemployment rate by year of arrival in Australia, all Australia (12 month average to February 2008) Country 1991–95 1996–2000 2001–05 2006–2010 ( Main English-speaking country 5.5% 2.9% 3.0% 6.0% Other than M.E.S. country 5.2% 6.3% 6.9% 13.1% ABS Labour Force Data: Participation rate by year of arrival in Australia, all Australia (12 month average to February 2008) Country 1991–95* 1996–2000 2001–05 2006–2010 Main English-speaking country 78.3% 78.1% 80.5% 76.5% Other than M.E.S. country 65.4% 66.8% 64.4% 56.7% * Many people who arrived between 1991–1995 would have spent between 13–17 years in the Australian labour force, and would now be approaching retirement age.

8. (Source: 2006 Census) Another important part of the profile of the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA area is the distribution of employment across industries. As can be seen from the chart, the Manufacturing industry was the largest employing industry in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA and accounted for around 18 per cent of employment. Other major employing industries were Retail Trade (15 per cent of total employment) and Property and Business Services (9 per cent of total employment). These three industries accounted for a higher proportion of employment in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA than in NSW overall. On the other hand, industries such as the Health & Community Services and Education industries accounted for a lower proportion of employment compared with NSW. An analysis of the workforce within industries also sheds some light on some additional characteristics of employment, which may be impacting on recruitment in the area. ABS 2006 Census data indicates that a higher proportion of the workforce in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA were employed in medium to lower skilled occupations (57 per cent) compared with NSW overall (46 per cent). Most notable is the higher than average proportion of people employed as Intermediate Production and Transport Workers, 14 per cent compared with 8 per cent for New South Wales. In addition, in the five years between the 2001 and 2006 Census, significant growth in employment has occurred across the higher skilled levels: Professionals (20 per cent); Associate Professionals (11 per cent); Managers (10 per cent) Tradespersons (3 per cent) In fact, all occupations experienced growth to varying degrees except Advanced Clerical and Service Workers (declined by 12 per cent). Intermediate Clerical, Sales and Service Workers (+9 per cent); Elementary Clerical, Sales and Service Workers (+11 per cent); Intermediate Production and Transport Workers ( +8.5 per cent); and Labourers (+6 per cent). Census 2006 data show that 33 per cent of all employees were aged 45 years and over. Industries with the largest proportion of employees aged 45 years and over were Education (42 per cent), Health and Community Services (41 per cent) and Manufacturing (40 per cent). ---------------------------------------- EMPLOYMENT GROWTH (Source: ABS 2006 and 2001 Census). We can gain some insight into how this industry composition has changed by analysing the industry growth that has occurred in the past five years between the 2001 and 2006 Census. According to these figures, employment in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA has grown by around 13 per cent between 2001 and 2006. This employment growth has been particularly strong in the Health and Community Services (up by 29 per cent) industry. Other industries that received strong growth include; Transport and Storage (up by 26 per cent), Education (up by 25 per cent) Government and Administration (up by 25 per cent) However the largest employing industry, Manufacturing, has declined between the two Census (down by 8 per cent or around 2100 persons). MANUFACTURING 29 employers surveyed. Half (15) were very small businesses, and employed between 2–9 employees, while one-quarter (7) had 10–19 employees and the remaining quarter (7) had 20–99 employees. 55% of Manufacturing employers surveyed recruited (no=16), and 5.2% (no=4) vacancies were unfilled (total vacancies= 77). 69% of Manufacturing employers had difficulty. 59% of Manufacturing employers will recruit in the future. Of the Manufacturing employers in the most recent recruitment round (16), over half (56%) has unsuitable applicants. Excluding outliers, there were 22 Manufacturing vacancies in the most recent recruitment round. These vacancies attracted an average of 4.9 applicants per vacancy, and an average of 1.5 applicants was suitable. Reasons employers found applicants unsuitable was due to a lack of technical skills or expertise to do the job (100% of employers who had unsuitable applicants). Employers often found applicants unsuitable doe to a lack of work experience (62.5%). 56% of employers had difficulty in the most recent recruitment round WORKING POPULATION PROFILE (2006 Census) Count of employed persons (aged 15 years and over) who work in the Fairfield Liverpool statistical region Industry (ANZSIC) Persons employed % of all industries Manufacturing 18,938 20% Retail Trade 10,952 11.5% Health Care & Social Assistance 10,724 11.3% Education & Training 7,926 8.3% Wholesale trade 6,806 7.1% Construction 5,930 6.2% TOTAL Working Population 95,095 100.0%(Source: 2006 Census) Another important part of the profile of the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA area is the distribution of employment across industries. As can be seen from the chart, the Manufacturing industry was the largest employing industry in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA and accounted for around 18 per cent of employment. Other major employing industries were Retail Trade (15 per cent of total employment) and Property and Business Services (9 per cent of total employment). These three industries accounted for a higher proportion of employment in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA than in NSW overall. On the other hand, industries such as the Health & Community Services and Education industries accounted for a lower proportion of employment compared with NSW. An analysis of the workforce within industries also sheds some light on some additional characteristics of employment, which may be impacting on recruitment in the area. ABS 2006 Census data indicates that a higher proportion of the workforce in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA were employed in medium to lower skilled occupations (57 per cent) compared with NSW overall (46 per cent). Most notable is the higher than average proportion of people employed as Intermediate Production and Transport Workers, 14 per cent compared with 8 per cent for New South Wales. In addition, in the five years between the 2001 and 2006 Census, significant growth in employment has occurred across the higher skilled levels: Professionals (20 per cent); Associate Professionals (11 per cent); Managers (10 per cent) Tradespersons (3 per cent) In fact, all occupations experienced growth to varying degrees except Advanced Clerical and Service Workers (declined by 12 per cent). Intermediate Clerical, Sales and Service Workers (+9 per cent); Elementary Clerical, Sales and Service Workers (+11 per cent); Intermediate Production and Transport Workers ( +8.5 per cent); and Labourers (+6 per cent). Census 2006 data show that 33 per cent of all employees were aged 45 years and over. Industries with the largest proportion of employees aged 45 years and over were Education (42 per cent), Health and Community Services (41 per cent) and Manufacturing (40 per cent). ---------------------------------------- EMPLOYMENT GROWTH (Source: ABS 2006 and 2001 Census). We can gain some insight into how this industry composition has changed by analysing the industry growth that has occurred in the past five years between the 2001 and 2006 Census. According to these figures, employment in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA has grown by around 13 per cent between 2001 and 2006. This employment growth has been particularly strong in the Health and Community Services (up by 29 per cent) industry. Other industries that received strong growth include; Transport and Storage (up by 26 per cent), Education (up by 25 per cent) Government and Administration (up by 25 per cent) However the largest employing industry, Manufacturing, has declined between the two Census (down by 8 per cent or around 2100 persons). MANUFACTURING 29 employers surveyed. Half (15) were very small businesses, and employed between 2–9 employees, while one-quarter (7) had 10–19 employees and the remaining quarter (7) had 20–99 employees. 55% of Manufacturing employers surveyed recruited (no=16), and 5.2% (no=4) vacancies were unfilled (total vacancies= 77). 69% of Manufacturing employers had difficulty. 59% of Manufacturing employers will recruit in the future. Of the Manufacturing employers in the most recent recruitment round (16), over half (56%) has unsuitable applicants. Excluding outliers, there were 22 Manufacturing vacancies in the most recent recruitment round. These vacancies attracted an average of 4.9 applicants per vacancy, and an average of 1.5 applicants was suitable. Reasons employers found applicants unsuitable was due to a lack of technical skills or expertise to do the job (100% of employers who had unsuitable applicants). Employers often found applicants unsuitable doe to a lack of work experience (62.5%). 56% of employers had difficulty in the most recent recruitment round WORKING POPULATION PROFILE (2006 Census) Count of employed persons (aged 15 years and over) who work in the Fairfield Liverpool statistical region Industry (ANZSIC) Persons employed % of all industries Manufacturing 18,938 20% Retail Trade 10,952 11.5% Health Care & Social Assistance 10,724 11.3% Education & Training 7,926 8.3% Wholesale trade 6,806 7.1% Construction 5,930 6.2% TOTAL Working Population 95,095 100.0%

9. Next we look at the recruitment experiences of employers in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, and in particular, what skills are in demand in this region. To gain a greater understanding of the skills in demand in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, DEEWR conducted a telephone survey of local employers in February 2008. Findings from the survey provide a good indication of the nature of recruitment activity and the extent to which local employers face recruitment difficulties, as well as identifying labour market opportunities that Employment Services Providers can tap into. The Fairfield-Liverpool Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences collected information from 221 businesses. These responses were concentrated in 9 key industries. Overall the survey found that: 54.3 per cent of employers surveyed had recruited or attempted to recruit in the past 12 months, which is slightly lower level of recruitment activity when compared with other regions surveyed (56.0 per cent). In Fairfield-Liverpool, the level of recruitment activity was particularly high in the Wholesale Trade (80.0 per cent of employers recruited), along with the Transport and Storage (61.1 per cent) and Retail Trade (59.4 per cent) industries. In all, employers reported that they had attempted to fill 608 vacancies in the past 12 months and, of these, 3.8 per cent (23) were not filled. This proportion of unfilled vacancies was low in comparison with the average for other areas (9.3 per cent) but nonetheless indicates that there are a number of vacancies that are remaining unfilled in the region. The proportion of vacancies unfilled was highest in the Construction industry (17.1 per cent of vacancies remained unfilled), while all vacancies were filled by employers in the Education, Transport and Storage,, and Personal Service Industries. The proportion of unfilled vacancies is indicative of the depth of recruitment difficulties in the region or industries. Another indicator of recruitment difficulty is the number of employers who experienced unfilled vacancies over the last 12 months. Overall 11.7 per cent of employers who had attempted to recruit reported one or more unfilled vacancies. This proportion was highest in the Finance and Insurance industry (33.3 per cent), while only 8.3 per cent of employers in the Wholesale Trade industry had one or more unfilled vacancies in the past 12 months. Finally, of the employers who had attempted to recruit, 57.5 per cent reported difficulty filling vacancies. This was significantly lower than for other areas surveyed (62.8 per cent). Difficulty was more commonly reported in the Wholesale Trade industry (75.0 per cent of employers), as well as the Construction industry (70 per cent each). --------------------------- * NOTE: A further 28 sole traders were surveyed, however, the results for these businesses have been excluded. The Fairfield-Liverpool region was surveyed in September 2006, at that time the main findings were; Survey question FFLP 2008 FFLP 2006 All regions, 10 mo to Jan 2008 Whether recruited (last 12 months) 54.3% 64.8% 56.0% Unfill rate 3.8% 2% 9.3% % of employers with unfilled vacancies 11.7% — 19.9% Had difficulty 57.5% 46.2% 62.8% Will recruit next 12 months 50.7% 62.1% 46.6% Expects difficulty next 12 months 46.4% 27.4% 57.7%Next we look at the recruitment experiences of employers in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, and in particular, what skills are in demand in this region. To gain a greater understanding of the skills in demand in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, DEEWR conducted a telephone survey of local employers in February 2008. Findings from the survey provide a good indication of the nature of recruitment activity and the extent to which local employers face recruitment difficulties, as well as identifying labour market opportunities that Employment Services Providers can tap into. The Fairfield-Liverpool Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences collected information from 221 businesses. These responses were concentrated in 9 key industries. Overall the survey found that: 54.3 per cent of employers surveyed had recruited or attempted to recruit in the past 12 months, which is slightly lower level of recruitment activity when compared with other regions surveyed (56.0 per cent). In Fairfield-Liverpool, the level of recruitment activity was particularly high in the Wholesale Trade (80.0 per cent of employers recruited), along with the Transport and Storage (61.1 per cent) and Retail Trade (59.4 per cent) industries. In all, employers reported that they had attempted to fill 608 vacancies in the past 12 months and, of these, 3.8 per cent (23) were not filled. This proportion of unfilled vacancies was low in comparison with the average for other areas (9.3 per cent) but nonetheless indicates that there are a number of vacancies that are remaining unfilled in the region. The proportion of vacancies unfilled was highest in the Construction industry (17.1 per cent of vacancies remained unfilled), while all vacancies were filled by employers in the Education, Transport and Storage,, and Personal Service Industries. The proportion of unfilled vacancies is indicative of the depth of recruitment difficulties in the region or industries. Another indicator of recruitment difficulty is the number of employers who experienced unfilled vacancies over the last 12 months. Overall 11.7 per cent of employers who had attempted to recruit reported one or more unfilled vacancies. This proportion was highest in the Finance and Insurance industry (33.3 per cent), while only 8.3 per cent of employers in the Wholesale Trade industry had one or more unfilled vacancies in the past 12 months. Finally, of the employers who had attempted to recruit, 57.5 per cent reported difficulty filling vacancies. This was significantly lower than for other areas surveyed (62.8 per cent). Difficulty was more commonly reported in the Wholesale Trade industry (75.0 per cent of employers), as well as the Construction industry (70 per cent each). --------------------------- * NOTE: A further 28 sole traders were surveyed, however, the results for these businesses have been excluded. The Fairfield-Liverpool region was surveyed in September 2006, at that time the main findings were; Survey question FFLP 2008 FFLP 2006 All regions, 10 mo to Jan 2008 Whether recruited (last 12 months) 54.3% 64.8% 56.0% Unfill rate 3.8% 2% 9.3% % of employers with unfilled vacancies 11.7% — 19.9% Had difficulty 57.5% 46.2% 62.8% Will recruit next 12 months 50.7% 62.1% 46.6% Expects difficulty next 12 months 46.4% 27.4% 57.7%

10. As discussed on the previous slide, recruitment difficulties can be attributed to a number of causes. While many of these reasons relate to aspects of the employer, industry or region, such as location or availability of local labour supply, other causes of difficulty can stem from the type of occupation that an employer is attempting to fill. One of the key indicators to measure the recruitment difficulties in an occupation is the degree of success that employers had in filling vacancies with suitable job seekers. Employers were asked to provide information on their most recent vacancy. This chart shows the number of vacancies that were reported by employers in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA. These are broken down by skill level and whether the employer filled the vacancy with suitable staff (blue section), filled the vacancy with staff who they were unhappy with or who required development (yellow section), and whether the vacancy was not filled (red section). Overall, employers in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA largely filled their vacancies with suitable staff. In all, only 13 of the 203 most recent vacancies were not filled (6.4 per cent) which is much lower than the unfilled rate of other regions (15.4 per cent). We can see from the chart that the highest number of most recent vacancies were in medium skilled occupations, such as Truck Drivers and Childcare Workers (83 vacancies for medium skilled occupations in total). In addition, this skill group had a marginally lower proportion of unfilled vacancies; the unfilled rate for medium skilled occupations (6.0 per cent) was almost half that of what other regions experienced (11.1 per cent). The pattern among higher and lower skilled occupations was similar, with only 4 of the vacancies in each skill level remaining unfilled (6.2 per cent and 7.3 per cent unfilled, respectively). --------------------------- Skill levels Highly skilled includes: Managers and Administrators; Professionals; Associate Professionals; and Tradespersons and Related Workers. Medium skilled includes: Advanced Clerical and Service Workers; Intermediate Clerical, Sales and Service Workers; and Intermediate Production and Transport Workers. Lower skilled includes: Elementary Clerical, Sales and Service Workers; and Labourers and Related Workers. As discussed on the previous slide, recruitment difficulties can be attributed to a number of causes. While many of these reasons relate to aspects of the employer, industry or region, such as location or availability of local labour supply, other causes of difficulty can stem from the type of occupation that an employer is attempting to fill. One of the key indicators to measure the recruitment difficulties in an occupation is the degree of success that employers had in filling vacancies with suitable job seekers. Employers were asked to provide information on their most recent vacancy. This chart shows the number of vacancies that were reported by employers in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA. These are broken down by skill level and whether the employer filled the vacancy with suitable staff (blue section), filled the vacancy with staff who they were unhappy with or who required development (yellow section), and whether the vacancy was not filled (red section). Overall, employers in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA largely filled their vacancies with suitable staff. In all, only 13 of the 203 most recent vacancies were not filled (6.4 per cent) which is much lower than the unfilled rate of other regions (15.4 per cent). We can see from the chart that the highest number of most recent vacancies were in medium skilled occupations, such as Truck Drivers and Childcare Workers (83 vacancies for medium skilled occupations in total). In addition, this skill group had a marginally lower proportion of unfilled vacancies; the unfilled rate for medium skilled occupations (6.0 per cent) was almost half that of what other regions experienced (11.1 per cent). The pattern among higher and lower skilled occupations was similar, with only 4 of the vacancies in each skill level remaining unfilled (6.2 per cent and 7.3 per cent unfilled, respectively). --------------------------- Skill levels Highly skilled includes: Managers and Administrators; Professionals; Associate Professionals; and Tradespersons and Related Workers. Medium skilled includes: Advanced Clerical and Service Workers; Intermediate Clerical, Sales and Service Workers; and Intermediate Production and Transport Workers. Lower skilled includes: Elementary Clerical, Sales and Service Workers; and Labourers and Related Workers.

11. The recruitment experiences of employers illustrates the second indicator of recruitment difficulties, the degree of competition for vacancies and the quality of applicants. The main forms of recruitment methods in this area were newspaper adds (42.5 per cent), followed by internet advertising and word of mouth (29.2 per cent for both). This chart shows the average number of people who applied for vacancies (most recent only) and the average number of applicants who were considered suitable for the job for which they had applied. Overall, the results of the survey indicate that there is an average level of competition for vacancies in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA with an average of 4.7 applicants per vacancy. This was slightly higher than the average level of competition found in the areas surveyed in other regions (4.0 applicants). The level of competition for jobs is closely related to the labour market conditions in an area. Areas of higher unemployment, typically have a higher level of competition for vacancies. As at December 2007 the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA unemployment rate was 7.1 per cent compared with 4.4 per cent for Australia overall. The level of competition for vacancies is also closely related to the type and skill level of an occupation. Higher skilled vacancies attracted an average of 5.2 applicants per vacancy, while lower skilled vacancies had one person less apply (4.0) per vacancy. Competition for vacancies alone does not explain how labour supply contributes to recruitment difficulties. The quality of applicants can affect not only whether an employer fills a vacancy but also whether they are satisfied with the result of recruitment. As shown in the chart, an average of 1.9 applicants were considered suitable for the job for which they had applied in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA. This average was greatest for medium skilled vacancies (2.1) and lowest among lower skilled vacancies (1.5 applicants). The number of suitable applicants in Fairfield-Liverpool (1.9 applicants) was similar to other regions (1.7 applicants). --------------------------- OUTLIERS WERE REMOVED FOR THIS SLIDE ONLY The high total number of applicants per position was affected by a very large number of applicants (i.e. over 100) for certain positions, such as metal fitters, after school care workers, receptionists, lab assistants and factory hands. Therefore, 15 records that had more than 30 applicants were removed for this slide only, and the average number of applicants and suitable applicants calculated excluding the outliers. Data from these 15 records were included in all other slides and calculations. OUTLIERS REMOVED: Occupation # vacancies Applicants Suitable applicants Cook 4 50 35 Metal Fitter 3 150 10 Child Carer 3 100 8 Import export manager 1 40 2 Child Carer 1 40 4 Receptionist 2 150 15 Storeperson 1 50 12 Secondary Teacher 1 40 10 Medical technician 1 145 10 Storeperson 1 31 30 Process worker 1 50 6 Receptionist 1 70 5 Receptionist 1 60 2 Stock/purchase clerk 1 40 5 Storeperson 1 60 12The recruitment experiences of employers illustrates the second indicator of recruitment difficulties, the degree of competition for vacancies and the quality of applicants. The main forms of recruitment methods in this area were newspaper adds (42.5 per cent), followed by internet advertising and word of mouth (29.2 per cent for both). This chart shows the average number of people who applied for vacancies (most recent only) and the average number of applicants who were considered suitable for the job for which they had applied. Overall, the results of the survey indicate that there is an average level of competition for vacancies in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA with an average of 4.7 applicants per vacancy. This was slightly higher than the average level of competition found in the areas surveyed in other regions (4.0 applicants). The level of competition for jobs is closely related to the labour market conditions in an area. Areas of higher unemployment, typically have a higher level of competition for vacancies. As at December 2007 the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA unemployment rate was 7.1 per cent compared with 4.4 per cent for Australia overall. The level of competition for vacancies is also closely related to the type and skill level of an occupation. Higher skilled vacancies attracted an average of 5.2 applicants per vacancy, while lower skilled vacancies had one person less apply (4.0) per vacancy. Competition for vacancies alone does not explain how labour supply contributes to recruitment difficulties. The quality of applicants can affect not only whether an employer fills a vacancy but also whether they are satisfied with the result of recruitment. As shown in the chart, an average of 1.9 applicants were considered suitable for the job for which they had applied in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA. This average was greatest for medium skilled vacancies (2.1) and lowest among lower skilled vacancies (1.5 applicants). The number of suitable applicants in Fairfield-Liverpool (1.9 applicants) was similar to other regions (1.7 applicants). --------------------------- OUTLIERS WERE REMOVED FOR THIS SLIDE ONLY The high total number of applicants per position was affected by a very large number of applicants (i.e. over 100) for certain positions, such as metal fitters, after school care workers, receptionists, lab assistants and factory hands. Therefore, 15 records that had more than 30 applicants were removed for this slide only, and the average number of applicants and suitable applicants calculated excluding the outliers. Data from these 15 records were included in all other slides and calculations. OUTLIERS REMOVED: Occupation # vacancies Applicants Suitable applicants Cook 4 50 35 Metal Fitter 3 150 10 Child Carer 3 100 8 Import export manager 1 40 2 Child Carer 1 40 4 Receptionist 2 150 15 Storeperson 1 50 12 Secondary Teacher 1 40 10 Medical technician 1 145 10 Storeperson 1 31 30 Process worker 1 50 6 Receptionist 1 70 5 Receptionist 1 60 2 Stock/purchase clerk 1 40 5 Storeperson 1 60 12

12. This chart shows why surveyed employers found one or more applicants to be unsuitable for the occupation for which they had applied, by the skill level of the occupation. Across all most recently advertised vacancies, employers most commonly found one or more applicants to be unsuitable because they had insufficient experience to perform job duties (50.6 per cent of employers). Other reasons that were commonly reported by employers included: Limited Interest in the Job (35.4 per cent); and Insufficient qualifications or training to perform job duties (25.3 per cent). However, as can be seen from the chart, these results were markedly different depending on the skill level of the vacancy. For instance, employers with higher skilled vacancies were more likely to consider applicants unsuitable due to insufficient experience and insufficient qualifications or training, whereas employers with medium and lower skilled vacancies were more likely to consider applicants unsuitable due to insufficient experience an a limited interest in the job. What these results emphasise is the importance of improving the job readiness of job seekers to improve local employment outcomes, particularly for medium and lower skilled vacancies. Survey results suggest that the quality of applicants can be improved by addressing issues relating to the enthusiasm of applicants as well as how applicants present themselves during selection processes. This chart shows why surveyed employers found one or more applicants to be unsuitable for the occupation for which they had applied, by the skill level of the occupation. Across all most recently advertised vacancies, employers most commonly found one or more applicants to be unsuitable because they had insufficient experience to perform job duties (50.6 per cent of employers). Other reasons that were commonly reported by employers included: Limited Interest in the Job (35.4 per cent); and Insufficient qualifications or training to perform job duties (25.3 per cent). However, as can be seen from the chart, these results were markedly different depending on the skill level of the vacancy. For instance, employers with higher skilled vacancies were more likely to consider applicants unsuitable due to insufficient experience and insufficient qualifications or training, whereas employers with medium and lower skilled vacancies were more likely to consider applicants unsuitable due to insufficient experience an a limited interest in the job. What these results emphasise is the importance of improving the job readiness of job seekers to improve local employment outcomes, particularly for medium and lower skilled vacancies. Survey results suggest that the quality of applicants can be improved by addressing issues relating to the enthusiasm of applicants as well as how applicants present themselves during selection processes.

13. 43.3 per cent of employers in the Fairfield-Liverpool area reported that it was difficult to fill their most recent vacancy, which was 9.3 percentage points lower than the average for other areas (52.6 per cent). Information on recruitment difficulties and skills in demand is difficult to obtain. The Department monitors and undertakes research on skills in demand and prepares listings of these occupations at the State and national level. The prime focus of DEEWR’s approach is surveying employers who have recently advertised vacancies for selected skilled occupations, although contact is also made with industry bodies and employer organisations. This information is published on the Department's Workplace site (www.workplace.gov.au/skillsindemand). Survey results for other regions show that difficulty increases with the skill level of the vacancy. This is broadly consistent with the results for Fairfield-Liverpool with approximately 45 per cent of employers with higher and medium skilled vacancies reporting difficulty, compared with 38 per cent for lower skilled vacancies. The reasons for these recruitment difficulties most commonly related to the tight labour market / not enough applicants (48.1 per cent). Other commonly reported reasons for recruitment difficulty were: technical skill requirements of the job (36.5 per cent), soft skill requirements of the job (15.4 per cent), the nature of the work required (13.5 per cent), and wages or remuneration not competitive (13.5 per cent). 43.3 per cent of employers in the Fairfield-Liverpool area reported that it was difficult to fill their most recent vacancy, which was 9.3 percentage points lower than the average for other areas (52.6 per cent). Information on recruitment difficulties and skills in demand is difficult to obtain. The Department monitors and undertakes research on skills in demand and prepares listings of these occupations at the State and national level. The prime focus of DEEWR’s approach is surveying employers who have recently advertised vacancies for selected skilled occupations, although contact is also made with industry bodies and employer organisations. This information is published on the Department's Workplace site (www.workplace.gov.au/skillsindemand). Survey results for other regions show that difficulty increases with the skill level of the vacancy. This is broadly consistent with the results for Fairfield-Liverpool with approximately 45 per cent of employers with higher and medium skilled vacancies reporting difficulty, compared with 38 per cent for lower skilled vacancies. The reasons for these recruitment difficulties most commonly related to the tight labour market / not enough applicants (48.1 per cent). Other commonly reported reasons for recruitment difficulty were: technical skill requirements of the job (36.5 per cent), soft skill requirements of the job (15.4 per cent), the nature of the work required (13.5 per cent), and wages or remuneration not competitive (13.5 per cent).

14. What we can see on this slide is an indicative list of the occupations that were most commonly reported as difficult to fill by employers (all vacancies over the last 12 months)1. While this list of occupations does not directly translate to a comprehensive list of occupations in demand for the region, it does provide valuable information on jobs that are difficult to fill and identifies opportunities for job seekers with the appropriate skills and qualifications or the ability to quickly gain these skills. As is evident from the list, recruitment difficulties exist across the range of skill levels, including occupations such as: Higher skilled occupations: Metal Fitters and Machinists Secondary School Teachers Medium and lower skilled occupations: Childcare workers Truck and Delivery Drivers Storepersons Sales Assistants ------------------------------------------------ 1Greatest difficulty has been determined by multiple employers in the region reporting recruitment difficulty for that occupation and does not necessarily translate into unfilled vacancies in that occupation. What we can see on this slide is an indicative list of the occupations that were most commonly reported as difficult to fill by employers (all vacancies over the last 12 months)1. While this list of occupations does not directly translate to a comprehensive list of occupations in demand for the region, it does provide valuable information on jobs that are difficult to fill and identifies opportunities for job seekers with the appropriate skills and qualifications or the ability to quickly gain these skills. As is evident from the list, recruitment difficulties exist across the range of skill levels, including occupations such as: Higher skilled occupations: Metal Fitters and Machinists Secondary School Teachers Medium and lower skilled occupations: Childcare workers Truck and Delivery Drivers Storepersons Sales Assistants ------------------------------------------------ 1Greatest difficulty has been determined by multiple employers in the region reporting recruitment difficulty for that occupation and does not necessarily translate into unfilled vacancies in that occupation.

15. What the preceding analysis has demonstrated is that recruitment difficulties exist across a broad range of occupations in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA. This section will analyse how demand for labour may develop over the next 12 months and the effect of this demand on future recruitment difficulties. Survey results suggest that recruitment will remain relatively constant over the next 12 months with over half of the employers surveyed expecting to recruit (51 per cent). This is higher than the recruitment expectations in other regions surveyed (47 per cent). Within Fairfield-Liverpool, future recruitment expectations are particularly high in the Finance and Insurance (91 per cent) and Wholesale Trade (73 per cent) and least prevalent in the Construction (41 per cent) and Accommodation, Cafes & Restaurant industries. A large amount of this recruitment is anticipated to stem from employment growth. Overall, 64 per cent of the employers who expect to recruit anticipate creating positions within their business over the next 12 months, which is significantly higher than the average of 56 per cent for other regions. These employment growth expectations are particularly high in the Accommodation, Cafes & Restaurant (100 per cent), Construction (78 per cent), and Health and Community Services (69 per cent) industries. Employment growth of this type is likely to place pressure on employers to retain staff. In relation to retention, 59.8 per cent of employers who expect to recruit anticipate needing to recruit to replace staff in their business in the next 12 months. This proportion is particularly high in the Wholesale Trade (77.8 per cent) and Finance and Insurance Services (70.0 per cent). These results suggest that demand for labour could grow in the region over the next 12 months possibly leading to increasing recruitment difficulties both in attracting and retaining staff. This expectation of recruitment difficulties is an outlook held by 46.4 per cent of employers who expect to recruit in the next 12 months, which is low compared with other regions surveyed (57.7 per cent). Employers in Fairfield Liverpool most commonly used formal recruitment methods (75 per cent), mainly newspaper advertising (42.5 per cent) and internet advertising (29 per cent). However, a large minority of employers (37%) used informal recruitment methods, notably using word of mouth (29 per cent) in order to find applicants. In the face of increasing demand and recruitment difficulties, employers will need to look for strategies to develop job seekers to meet their business needs. A third (33 per cent) of recruiting employers were willing to employ an apprentice or trainee in the next 12 months. This was particularly high among employers in the Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurant (62.5 per cent) industry. Of the employers who would not engage an apprentice or trainee, the most commonly reported barrier to providing this opportunity was that employers had no need for an apprentice or trainee (64.7 per cent). ---------------------------------------------------- RECRUITMENT METHODS USED “Informal” methods of recruitment include (used by 37 per cent of employers): Word of mouth/ approached by job seeker (used by 29.2 per cent of employers); Approached by job seeker (used by 6.7 per cent of employers); and Sign in window/ billboard (used by 2.5 per cent of employers). ‘Formal” methods of recruitment includes (used by 75 per cent of employers): Newspaper (used by 42.5 per cent of employers); Internet (used by 29.2 per cent of employers); Recruitment agency (used by 16.7 per cent of employers); Internal advertising (used by 10 per cent of employers); Job Network (used by 1.7 per cent of employers); Through an educational institution (used by 0.8 per cent of employers);What the preceding analysis has demonstrated is that recruitment difficulties exist across a broad range of occupations in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA. This section will analyse how demand for labour may develop over the next 12 months and the effect of this demand on future recruitment difficulties. Survey results suggest that recruitment will remain relatively constant over the next 12 months with over half of the employers surveyed expecting to recruit (51 per cent). This is higher than the recruitment expectations in other regions surveyed (47 per cent). Within Fairfield-Liverpool, future recruitment expectations are particularly high in the Finance and Insurance (91 per cent) and Wholesale Trade (73 per cent) and least prevalent in the Construction (41 per cent) and Accommodation, Cafes & Restaurant industries. A large amount of this recruitment is anticipated to stem from employment growth. Overall, 64 per cent of the employers who expect to recruit anticipate creating positions within their business over the next 12 months, which is significantly higher than the average of 56 per cent for other regions. These employment growth expectations are particularly high in the Accommodation, Cafes & Restaurant (100 per cent), Construction (78 per cent), and Health and Community Services (69 per cent) industries. Employment growth of this type is likely to place pressure on employers to retain staff. In relation to retention, 59.8 per cent of employers who expect to recruit anticipate needing to recruit to replace staff in their business in the next 12 months. This proportion is particularly high in the Wholesale Trade (77.8 per cent) and Finance and Insurance Services (70.0 per cent). These results suggest that demand for labour could grow in the region over the next 12 months possibly leading to increasing recruitment difficulties both in attracting and retaining staff. This expectation of recruitment difficulties is an outlook held by 46.4 per cent of employers who expect to recruit in the next 12 months, which is low compared with other regions surveyed (57.7 per cent). Employers in Fairfield Liverpool most commonly used formal recruitment methods (75 per cent), mainly newspaper advertising (42.5 per cent) and internet advertising (29 per cent). However, a large minority of employers (37%) used informal recruitment methods, notably using word of mouth (29 per cent) in order to find applicants. In the face of increasing demand and recruitment difficulties, employers will need to look for strategies to develop job seekers to meet their business needs. A third (33 per cent) of recruiting employers were willing to employ an apprentice or trainee in the next 12 months. This was particularly high among employers in the Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurant (62.5 per cent) industry. Of the employers who would not engage an apprentice or trainee, the most commonly reported barrier to providing this opportunity was that employers had no need for an apprentice or trainee (64.7 per cent). ---------------------------------------------------- RECRUITMENT METHODS USED “Informal” methods of recruitment include (used by 37 per cent of employers): Word of mouth/ approached by job seeker (used by 29.2 per cent of employers); Approached by job seeker (used by 6.7 per cent of employers); and Sign in window/ billboard (used by 2.5 per cent of employers). ‘Formal” methods of recruitment includes (used by 75 per cent of employers): Newspaper (used by 42.5 per cent of employers); Internet (used by 29.2 per cent of employers); Recruitment agency (used by 16.7 per cent of employers); Internal advertising (used by 10 per cent of employers); Job Network (used by 1.7 per cent of employers); Through an educational institution (used by 0.8 per cent of employers);

16. Higher proportion of (working age) people 25–44 years Sustained high unemployment – particularly in overseas-born. Recruitment difficulties are common services need to focus on the “whole person” Future growth will place further pressure on local labour market. At the December quarter 2007, the unemployment rate for the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA averaged 7.1 per cent, which has fallen from 11.7 per cent since the September quarter 1998 (Source: Small Area Labour Market data). Despite falling unemployment in the region the unemployment rate is still considerably higher than Australia overall (4.4 per cent). People aged 25–44 accounted for 39% of the adult population in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA which was slightly higher than NSW and Australia (37 per cent). (Source: ESA population by age, June 2006, derived from ASB Estimate Resident Population). Recruitment difficulties are common in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, but to a lesser extent than other regions surveyed. A large proportion of employers (57.5 per cent) had difficulty recruiting in the last 12 months, however, this is lower than other regions surveyed (62.8 per cent); In the last 12 months 3.8 per cent of vacancies remained unfilled which is considerably lower than other regions (9.3 per cent); The level of competition for vacancies was higher than what was experienced in other areas (9.2 applicants compared with 4 applicants per vacancy); and There was also a higher number of suitable applicant per vacancy 2.4 compared with 1.7 applicants for other regions. Despite the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA experiencing difficulties to a lesser extent than other regions their experiences with recruitment were still very difficult. Furthermore, employers expect that these difficulties will continue in the future. This is an outlook held by 46.4 per cent of employers who expect to recruit in the next 12 months. In addition, future growth will place further pressure on labour supply and increased need to consider job seeker development and other sources of labour. Future growth expectations are expected to place further pressure on the local labour supply with 64 per cent of recruiting employers expecting to do so due to increasing staff numbers. In doing so, it will become important to improve the job readiness of job seekers by addressing issues relating to the enthusiasm of applicants as well as how applicants present themselves during selection processes. At the December quarter 2007, the unemployment rate for the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA averaged 7.1 per cent, which has fallen from 11.7 per cent since the September quarter 1998 (Source: Small Area Labour Market data). Despite falling unemployment in the region the unemployment rate is still considerably higher than Australia overall (4.4 per cent). People aged 25–44 accounted for 39% of the adult population in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA which was slightly higher than NSW and Australia (37 per cent). (Source: ESA population by age, June 2006, derived from ASB Estimate Resident Population). Recruitment difficulties are common in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA, but to a lesser extent than other regions surveyed. A large proportion of employers (57.5 per cent) had difficulty recruiting in the last 12 months, however, this is lower than other regions surveyed (62.8 per cent); In the last 12 months 3.8 per cent of vacancies remained unfilled which is considerably lower than other regions (9.3 per cent); The level of competition for vacancies was higher than what was experienced in other areas (9.2 applicants compared with 4 applicants per vacancy); and There was also a higher number of suitable applicant per vacancy 2.4 compared with 1.7 applicants for other regions. Despite the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA experiencing difficulties to a lesser extent than other regions their experiences with recruitment were still very difficult. Furthermore, employers expect that these difficulties will continue in the future. This is an outlook held by 46.4 per cent of employers who expect to recruit in the next 12 months. In addition, future growth will place further pressure on labour supply and increased need to consider job seeker development and other sources of labour. Future growth expectations are expected to place further pressure on the local labour supply with 64 per cent of recruiting employers expecting to do so due to increasing staff numbers. In doing so, it will become important to improve the job readiness of job seekers by addressing issues relating to the enthusiasm of applicants as well as how applicants present themselves during selection processes.

17. Productivity Places Program to deliver 450 000 training places over four years 175 000 of the places will be for job seekers Focus on priority occupations in areas of skill demand Registered Training Organisations will work with employment service providers to identify eligible job seekers Activity test changes will be made to reflect the priority given to training The Productivity Places Program under the Skilling Australia for the Future initiative will deliver 450,000 training places over four years in priority occupations, to help Australian workers develop the skills they need. 175,000 training places are allocated to job seekers, including 20,000 apprenticeship places. Training places for job seekers will be available from April 2008. Priority occupations are occupations assessed as being in demand and occupations for which employers have experienced recruitment difficulty. Changes to the list of priority occupations will be made by Skills Australia – a high level body of experts, comprising economic, industry, academic and expertise in the provision of education or training – established to advise the Government on current and future demand for skills and training. It will identify future and persistent skills shortages as well as industries where retraining and up-skilling of workers may be required to prevent unemployment, under-employment and skills obsolescence. Flexible options for training will be available such as part-time, outside business hours and distance mode training. Innovative strategies may be used to deliver training in regional and remote locations. Training places will be delivered in an industry-driven system, ensuring that training is more responsive to the needs of businesses and participants. Employers can work with their local employment service providers and training organisations to meet their skills demands in priority occupations. Employment service providers will be encouraged to identify job seekers who are eligible for the fully funded training places and encourage them to undertake the training on offer. For Job Network and Disability Employment Network, time spent by a job seeker in approved Skilling Australia training will not count as time in assistance for star rating purposes. This will ensure that time spent in training will be excluded when calculating the speed of placement for star rating purposes. This is of course additional to the benefits of increased employability of job seekers as a result of quality training. The policy on activity test requirements will be improved to enable job seekers to undertake training. To ensure a job seeker is able to complete their training, the job seekers (whether in part-time or full-time training) will only be required to accept a job that fits around the timing of their training. This will maximise their chance to contribute meaningfully to the skilled labour needs of Australia. The Productivity Places Program under the Skilling Australia for the Future initiative will deliver 450,000 training places over four years in priority occupations, to help Australian workers develop the skills they need. 175,000 training places are allocated to job seekers, including 20,000 apprenticeship places. Training places for job seekers will be available from April 2008. Priority occupations are occupations assessed as being in demand and occupations for which employers have experienced recruitment difficulty. Changes to the list of priority occupations will be made by Skills Australia – a high level body of experts, comprising economic, industry, academic and expertise in the provision of education or training – established to advise the Government on current and future demand for skills and training. It will identify future and persistent skills shortages as well as industries where retraining and up-skilling of workers may be required to prevent unemployment, under-employment and skills obsolescence. Flexible options for training will be available such as part-time, outside business hours and distance mode training. Innovative strategies may be used to deliver training in regional and remote locations. Training places will be delivered in an industry-driven system, ensuring that training is more responsive to the needs of businesses and participants. Employers can work with their local employment service providers and training organisations to meet their skills demands in priority occupations. Employment service providers will be encouraged to identify job seekers who are eligible for the fully funded training places and encourage them to undertake the training on offer. For Job Network and Disability Employment Network, time spent by a job seeker in approved Skilling Australia training will not count as time in assistance for star rating purposes. This will ensure that time spent in training will be excluded when calculating the speed of placement for star rating purposes. This is of course additional to the benefits of increased employability of job seekers as a result of quality training. The policy on activity test requirements will be improved to enable job seekers to undertake training. To ensure a job seeker is able to complete their training, the job seekers (whether in part-time or full-time training) will only be required to accept a job that fits around the timing of their training. This will maximise their chance to contribute meaningfully to the skilled labour needs of Australia.

18. Fairfield Emerging Communities Action Partnership (FECAP) Employment Expo Liverpool Migrant and Refugee Expo Youth services provider network Fairfield GROW F1 in Schools Program Western Sydney Manufacturing week Fairfield and Liverpool Councils’ activities Local service provider activities Smithfield - Wetherill Park Business Expo NSW STATE OFFICE NSW STATE OFFICE

19. Strategies to increase the participation of Indigenous people, parents, people with a disability, mature age and the long-term unemployed job seekers? Strategies for better School to work transitions? Strategies for Employers and Employment Service Providers to work more effectively together to address skills and labour shortages? NSW STATE OFFICE Listed on the screen are some issues we think might be worth considering as a group. NSW STATE OFFICE Listed on the screen are some issues we think might be worth considering as a group.

20. NSW STATE OFFICE As I mentioned earlier we would like to come away today with some clear actions to address the labour market issues in this region that we have agreed we want to discuss. The action plan needs to focus on practical actions that can be implemented at a local level. The action plan should include identified deliverables, responsibilities and timelines. NSW STATE OFFICE As I mentioned earlier we would like to come away today with some clear actions to address the labour market issues in this region that we have agreed we want to discuss. The action plan needs to focus on practical actions that can be implemented at a local level. The action plan should include identified deliverables, responsibilities and timelines.

21. NSW STATE OFFICE We have a strategy to help us in evaluating the workshops and to help us further develop and refine the ‘better connections’ concept. All we really need to do today is to have you fill out the evaluation from – included as a part of the pack on your table - at the end of the workshop. One of the functions DEEWR performs is to follow up leads for projects that might be suitable for funding through one of our funding models. We are happy to discuss ideas and strategies you might have or follow up leads for possible projects to better engage the client groups we have talked about today. Please feel free to contact myself regarding these employer and industry. NSW STATE OFFICE We have a strategy to help us in evaluating the workshops and to help us further develop and refine the ‘better connections’ concept. All we really need to do today is to have you fill out the evaluation from – included as a part of the pack on your table - at the end of the workshop. One of the functions DEEWR performs is to follow up leads for projects that might be suitable for funding through one of our funding models. We are happy to discuss ideas and strategies you might have or follow up leads for possible projects to better engage the client groups we have talked about today. Please feel free to contact myself regarding these employer and industry.

22. Thank you More information: www.workplace.gov.au/bcw www.workplace.gov.au/regionalreports www.workplace.gov.au/lmip www.productivityplaces.deewr.gov.au NSW STATE OFFICE Thank you for participating. The presentation and the outcomes of today’s meeting will be placed on the Workplace portal on the internet (www.workplace.gov.au/bcw). We will circulate the contact list of participants and the action plan.NSW STATE OFFICE Thank you for participating. The presentation and the outcomes of today’s meeting will be placed on the Workplace portal on the internet (www.workplace.gov.au/bcw). We will circulate the contact list of participants and the action plan.

23. (Source: DEEWR Administrative Data, 12 months to December 2007) This chart shows vacancies lodged and filled by JNMs and JPOs in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA in the 12 months to December 2007 and the number of those vacancies filled – indicated by the red section of the bar. What this chart illustrates is that much of the activity of employment service providers is focussed on lower skilled occupations. These vacancies accounted for 53 per cent of all vacancies lodged with JNMs and JPOs in the 12 months to December 2007. Vacancies for medium skilled also accounted for a large proportion of vacancies lodged with JNMs or JPOs (31 per cent). The chart also illustrates that a number of the vacancies lodged with JNMs or JPOs were not filled. In total across all occupations almost half (48.8 per cent) of the vacancies were filled, which is slightly lower than the State average (50.2 per cent) and higher than the national average (43.7 per cent). With the fill rate being higher than the national averages, it shows good progress, but further work can be done to increase the take up of vacancies by the unemployed. Some of that work might be increasing work experience opportunities and honing job-seekers’ soft skills. ----------------- We acknowledge that some vacancies may be lodged with more than one provider or the vacancy may have been filled by someone other than a Job Network member or Job Placement Provider. (Source: DEEWR Administrative Data, 12 months to December 2007) This chart shows vacancies lodged and filled by JNMs and JPOs in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA in the 12 months to December 2007 and the number of those vacancies filled – indicated by the red section of the bar. What this chart illustrates is that much of the activity of employment service providers is focussed on lower skilled occupations. These vacancies accounted for 53 per cent of all vacancies lodged with JNMs and JPOs in the 12 months to December 2007. Vacancies for medium skilled also accounted for a large proportion of vacancies lodged with JNMs or JPOs (31 per cent). The chart also illustrates that a number of the vacancies lodged with JNMs or JPOs were not filled. In total across all occupations almost half (48.8 per cent) of the vacancies were filled, which is slightly lower than the State average (50.2 per cent) and higher than the national average (43.7 per cent). With the fill rate being higher than the national averages, it shows good progress, but further work can be done to increase the take up of vacancies by the unemployed. Some of that work might be increasing work experience opportunities and honing job-seekers’ soft skills. ----------------- We acknowledge that some vacancies may be lodged with more than one provider or the vacancy may have been filled by someone other than a Job Network member or Job Placement Provider.

24. In view of the combined effects of current and future demand for staff and the effects of an ageing population, recruitment difficulties are likely to continue, if not intensify, in the future. To meet this challenge, employers will need to look beyond traditional sources of labour. One such source of labour that may be available to take up opportunities created by a closer Job Network engagement with businesses are those currently in receipt of a Centrelink benefit. Overall, as at March 2008, there were around 59,000 persons of working age in receipt of a Centrelink allowance in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA. This equates to around 23.6 per cent of the total working age population, which is considerably higher than the proportion for NSW (16.9 per cent) and Australia overall (16.7 per cent) (Based on Centrelink administrative data, March 2008 and ABS Estimate Resident Population 2006). As is evident in the chart, which depicts those people whose main source of income is likely to be a government allowance, individuals in receipt of the Disability Support Pension (22.2 per cent) make up a larger proportion of Centrelink recipients in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA than those on other benefits. Other significant payment types are Newstart Allowance (20.4 per cent) and Parenting Payment Single (15.1 per cent) . These two payment types account for a further 35 per cent of the area’s Centrelink recipients. We can also see from the chart that the engagement with Job Network is quite high for Newstart Allowance, while engagement with Job Network is quite low for the other payment types. However, Job Network engagement for Newstart Allowance in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA is somewhat lower (73.4 per cent) in comparison with State (79.6 per cent) and National figures (78.8 per cent). Finally, we look at the age groups for people receiving a Centrelink benefit in the Fairfield-Liverpool area. If you recall, DSP was the single largest recipient group (12,800 people). There were a further 11 700 recipients on Newstart allowance, 8800 on Parenting Payment Single and 6000 on Parenting Payment Partnered. Combined there are 14 700 people on either of the Parenting Payments making parents the largest group on Centrelink benefits. Disability is strongly linked to ageing: as people grow older they are more likely to have, or acquire, a disability. Almost three quarters (73 per cent) of Disability recipients are in the 45–64 age group, while around three-quarters (76 per cent) of all Parenting Payment recipients are aged between 25-44 years. In Fairfield Liverpool, there are equal proportions of Newstart recipients aged 45–64 (44%) as are aged 25–44 (44%). In this region, a higher than average proportion of Newstart Allowance recepients were mature aged (44 per cent), compared with Australia (39 per cent). ----------------- Excludes persons engaged with Job Network as a non-allowee and non-allowee youth. Centrelink Age profile by selected benefit AUSTRALIA, 30 March 2008, Centrelink Administrative Data Benefit %15–24 %25–44 %45–64 DSP 6.4% 26.2% 67.4% NSA 13.6% 47.8% 38.6% PPP 14.0% 74.4% 11.6% PPS 14.1% 71.4% 14.2% YLO 100% 0% 0%In view of the combined effects of current and future demand for staff and the effects of an ageing population, recruitment difficulties are likely to continue, if not intensify, in the future. To meet this challenge, employers will need to look beyond traditional sources of labour. One such source of labour that may be available to take up opportunities created by a closer Job Network engagement with businesses are those currently in receipt of a Centrelink benefit. Overall, as at March 2008, there were around 59,000 persons of working age in receipt of a Centrelink allowance in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA. This equates to around 23.6 per cent of the total working age population, which is considerably higher than the proportion for NSW (16.9 per cent) and Australia overall (16.7 per cent) (Based on Centrelink administrative data, March 2008 and ABS Estimate Resident Population 2006). As is evident in the chart, which depicts those people whose main source of income is likely to be a government allowance, individuals in receipt of the Disability Support Pension (22.2 per cent) make up a larger proportion of Centrelink recipients in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA than those on other benefits. Other significant payment types are Newstart Allowance (20.4 per cent) and Parenting Payment Single (15.1 per cent) . These two payment types account for a further 35 per cent of the area’s Centrelink recipients. We can also see from the chart that the engagement with Job Network is quite high for Newstart Allowance, while engagement with Job Network is quite low for the other payment types. However, Job Network engagement for Newstart Allowance in the Fairfield-Liverpool ESA is somewhat lower (73.4 per cent) in comparison with State (79.6 per cent) and National figures (78.8 per cent). Finally, we look at the age groups for people receiving a Centrelink benefit in the Fairfield-Liverpool area. If you recall, DSP was the single largest recipient group (12,800 people). There were a further 11 700 recipients on Newstart allowance, 8800 on Parenting Payment Single and 6000 on Parenting Payment Partnered. Combined there are 14 700 people on either of the Parenting Payments making parents the largest group on Centrelink benefits. Disability is strongly linked to ageing: as people grow older they are more likely to have, or acquire, a disability. Almost three quarters (73 per cent) of Disability recipients are in the 45–64 age group, while around three-quarters (76 per cent) of all Parenting Payment recipients are aged between 25-44 years. In Fairfield Liverpool, there are equal proportions of Newstart recipients aged 45–64 (44%) as are aged 25–44 (44%). In this region, a higher than average proportion of Newstart Allowance recepients were mature aged (44 per cent), compared with Australia (39 per cent). ----------------- Excludes persons engaged with Job Network as a non-allowee and non-allowee youth. Centrelink Age profile by selected benefit AUSTRALIA, 30 March 2008, Centrelink Administrative Data Benefit %15–24 %25–44 %45–64 DSP 6.4% 26.2% 67.4% NSA 13.6% 47.8% 38.6% PPP 14.0% 74.4% 11.6% PPS 14.1% 71.4% 14.2% YLO 100% 0% 0%

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