Slide1 l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 20

Highest Education Level by Race/Ethnicity, 2002 Source: U.S. Census Bureau. (2003). Educational Attainment in the United States.: March 2002 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 67 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Postsecondary Participation Rates of 18- to 24-Year-Old High School Graduates, 1972–2001 Source: National Center for Education Statistics. (2002). Digest of Education Statistics. U.S. Department of Education.

Download Presentation

Highest Education Level by Race/Ethnicity, 2002 Source: U.S. Census Bureau. (2003). Educational Attainment in the United States.: March 2002

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Slide1 l.jpg

Postsecondary Participation Rates of 18- to 24-Year-Old High School Graduates, 1972–2001Source: National Center for Education Statistics. (2002). Digest of Education Statistics. U.S. Department of Education.


Slide2 l.jpg

Postsecondary Participation Rates of All 18- to 24-Year-Olds, 1972–2001Source: National Center for Education Statistics. (2002). Digest of Education Statistics. U.S. Department of Education.


Slide3 l.jpg

Postsecondary Enrollment Rates of Recent High School Graduates by Gender, 1967–2001Source: National Center for Education Statistics. (2002). Digest of Education Statistics. U.S. Department of Education.


Slide4 l.jpg

Postsecondary Enrollment Rates of 1992 High School Graduates by Family Income and Math Test ScoresSource: Ellwood, D & Kane, T. (2000). “Who is Getting a College Education? Family Background and the Growing Gaps in Enrollment.” S. Danziger & J. Waldfogel, eds. Securing the Future.


Slide5 l.jpg

Four-Year College and University Enrollment Rates of 1992 High School Graduates by Family Income and Math Test ScoresSource: Ellwood, D & Kane, T. (2000). “Who is Getting a College Education? Family Background and the Growing Gaps in Enrollment.” S. Danziger & J. Waldfogel, eds. Securing the Future.


Slide6 l.jpg

Postsecondary Enrollment Rates of 1992 High School Graduates by Family Income and Parent Education LevelSource: Ellwood, D & Kane, T. (2000). “Who is Getting a College Education? Family Background and the Growing Gaps in Enrollment.” S. Danziger & J. Waldfogel, eds. Securing the Future.


Slide7 l.jpg

Four-Year College and University Enrollment Rates of 1992 High School Graduates by Family Income and Parent Education LevelSource: Ellwood, D & Kane, T. (2000). “Who is Getting a College Education? Family Background and the Growing Gaps in Enrollment.” S. Danziger & J. Waldfogel, eds. Securing the Future.


Slide8 l.jpg

Postsecondary Enrollment Rates of 1992 High School Seniors by Socioeconomic Status (SES)Source: Adelman, C. (2004). Principle Indicators of Student Academic Histories in Postsecondary Education, 1972-2000. Institute for Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.


Slide9 l.jpg

Income Distribution of Full-Time, First-Year Students Within Sectors, 1999–2000Source: Congressional Budget Office. (2004). Private and Public Contributions to Financing College Education.


Slide10 l.jpg

Institutional Choice of Full-Time, First-Year Students by Income Level, 1999–2000Source: Congressional Budget Office. (2004). Private and Public Contributions to Financing College Education.


Slide11 l.jpg

Bachelor’s Degree Completion Rates of Four-Year College Entrants by RaceSource: National Center for Education Statistics. (2002). Descriptive Summary of 1995-96 Beginning Postsecondary Students: Six Years Later. (NCES 2003-151). U.S. Department of Education.


Slide12 l.jpg

Bachelor’s Degree Completion Rates of Four-Year College Entrants by Family IncomeSource: National Center for Education Statistics. (2002). Descriptive Summary of 1995-96 Beginning Postsecondary Students: Six Years Later. (NCES 2003-151). U.S. Department of Education.


Slide13 l.jpg

Highest Education Level by Race/Ethnicity, 2002Source: U.S. Census Bureau. (2003). Educational Attainment in the United States.: March 2002


Slide14 l.jpg

Level of Education in 2000 by Race/Ethnicity: 1992 High School GraduatesSource: Adelman, C. (2004). Principle Indicators of Student Academic Histories in Postsecondary Education, 1972-2000. Institute for Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.


Slide15 l.jpg

Level of Education in 2000 by Socioeconomic Background: 1992 High School GraduatesSource: Adelman, C. (2004). Principle Indicators of Student Academic Achievement Histories in Postsecondary Education, 1972-2000. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences.


Slide16 l.jpg

Education Level by Metropolitan/Nonmetropolitan Residence and Race/Ethnicity, 2000Economics Research Service. (2003). ERS/USDA Briefing Room: Rural Labor and Education: Rural Education. U.S. Department of Agriculture.


Slide17 l.jpg

Education Level by StateSource: National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. (2004). Policy Alert.


Slide18 l.jpg

International Comparison of Postsecondary Education Entry Rates, 2002Source: Oganisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2004). Education at a Glance.


Slide19 l.jpg

International Comparison: Participation in Postsecondary Education, 1992 to 2002Source: Oganisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2004). Education at a Glance.


  • Login