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West Midlands, NESS Workshop - Sharing Findings Start Mainstreaming Pilots by Geoff White, SQW. 19th July 2005 NATIONAL EVALUATION OF SURE START. Contents. Mainstreaming – general Mainstreaming – multiple providers Integrated or unified model Co-ordinated model Federated network model

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19th july 2005 national evaluation of sure start

West Midlands, NESS Workshop - Sharing Findings Start Mainstreaming Pilots by Geoff White, SQW

19th July 2005

NATIONAL EVALUATION OF SURE START

contents
Contents
  • Mainstreaming – general
  • Mainstreaming – multiple providers
    • Integrated or unified model
    • Co-ordinated model
    • Federated network model
  • Transition from pilot to mainstream change
  • The role of monitoring and evaluation
  • Constraints on service providers
  • Overcoming the constraints
  • Focus for evaluation
1 mainstreaming general

Service improvements targeted by the pilots

  • Policies
  • Redirecting resources
  • Reshaping services
  • Extending & improving access

Clients

mainstreaming

mainstreaming

Pilots

1) Mainstreaming - general
  • Integration, extension, infrastructure, preparation
  • Test-bed for more widespread change
  • Innovative, risky & counter-cultural
2 mainstreaming multiple providers

Mainstreaming pilots – service providers

Joining up resources, cultures, practices & activities integrated  coordinated  networked

Social services

Health

Education

Clients

mainstreaming

mainstreaming

Pilots

2) Mainstreaming – multiple providers
2a integrated or unified model
2a) Integrated or unified model

Multiple service providers

Achieving steady state in the joining up of resources & activities

Model 1: Unified, horizontal linkage, co-location and/or integration

Target clients

2b co ordinated model
2b) Co-ordinated model

Multiple service providers

Achieving steady state in joining up

Model 2: Formal co-ordination – synchronised training, standardised referral & information sharing protocols - some co-location

Target clients

2c federated network model
2c) Federated-network model

Multiple service providers

Achieving steady state in joining up

Model 3: Network within a coalition - federated structure – with single provider in the lead

Target clients

3 transition from pilot to mainstream

5. Steady state mainstreaming

4. Scaling up

2. Applied in targeted way 3. Absorption of good practice

1. Continuity funding

ABI

3) Transition from pilot to mainstream

High

Reward

Low

High

Risk

4 the role of monitoring evaluation
4) The role of monitoring & evaluation
  • Making an evidence-based case for change to service providers
  • Acknowledging the broader implications – this is not just a “project”
  • Considering process as well as impact outputs and outcomes
  • Engaging the providers and generating learning materials – a legacy
  • Recognising the constraints on providers and addressing them in an appropriate vocabulary
5 constraints on service providers the evidence from the mainstreaming pilots
5) Constraints on service providers – the evidence from the mainstreaming pilots
  • Provider capacity constraints – partnership overload
  • Provider risk aversion – preserving scale economies
  • Short-termism – competing pressures
  • Incompatibility of targets/priorities – equity issues
  • Local authority constraints – political & governance
  • Information deficiencies – need and supply
  • Vertical disconnection within single provider
  • Horizontal communication failure between providers
6 overcoming the barriers what worked
6) Overcoming the barriers – what worked
  • Achieving consensus on the mainstreaming aim

“we aim to improve existing services not create new ones”

  • Adopting strategic, focused & continuous approach

“establishing fit with national and local agendas and priorities”

  • Securing a mainstream champion with clout

“getting providers to take responsibility to identify problems & solutions”

  • Setting up structures & processes for innovation

“engaging partners & clients transparently through existing networks”

6 overcoming the barriers contd
6) Overcoming the barriers (contd)
  • Providing resource & support to front line staff

“clear definition of roles, training & operational guidance, peer support – team working – networking, systems – tools - protocols”

  • Making the case for change in provider ‘language’

“focus on how change enables targets to be achieved more efficiently”

  • Learning & disseminating lessons & good practice

“leave something behind – a legacy – protocols, guidance manuals”

“pro-active and evidence based promotion of mainstreaming lessons”

7 focus for evaluation
7) Focus for evaluation
  • Costs and activities, outputs and outcomes at different volumes and for different client groups
  • Nature and extent of achieved integration & issues of scaling up
  • Development of capacity – strategic partnership leadership, multi-professional & multi-agency management of delivery chain and at front-line
  • Reliable risk management – taking account of multiple & diverse needs, addressing weak links in & between delivery chains, harmonising & sharing of cost and other information
  • Outward and engaging perspective – providers, users & potential users and their communities
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