The school athens poole
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The School Athens, Poole. “So what do you want to study at University, Sam?”. “History, Sir.”. “Oh, great , what have you read?”. “Oh, I don’t like reading, I like History.”. The Ideal Applicant ?. Independence of thought Intellectual adaptability and flexibility .

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The School Athens, Poole

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The school athens poole

The School Athens, Poole

“So what do you want to study at University, Sam?”

“History, Sir.”

“Oh, great , what have you read?”

“Oh, I don’t like reading, I like History.”


The ideal applicant

The Ideal Applicant ?

  • Independenceof thought

  • Intellectual adaptability and flexibility.

  • Serious and mature about learning.

  • Able to ‘gut an argument’ and synthesise.

  • How might we facilitate those qualities?


The school athens poole

Scholarship and Achievement


The school athens poole

Scholarship and Achievement


The school athens poole

Available

Interest

Useful

Resilience

Comprehend

Scholarship and Achievement

Evaluate

Marking

Cogent

Comfortable

Synthesis

Fluent

Discursive


The school athens poole

Available

Interest

Useful

Resilience

Comprehend

Scholarship and Achievement

Evaluate

Marking

Cogent

Comfortable

Synthesis

Fluent

Discursive


The school athens poole

READING


Make them read my humble attempts to convert boys to the printed word

Make Them Read!My humble attempts to convert boys to the printed word.


Why don t kids read

Why don’t kids read?

  • It’s boring

  • Too tired – “easier after a busy day to just sit down and watch TV”

  • Doing too much sport

  • I use the internet

  • “I’m playing on my x-box”


Interest

Interest

  • Independent Project in Year 9

  • Year 13 Coursework which allows students maximum choice

  • Western Front Association Prize

  • Prizes in Hist and Arch Quizes

  • HARD for a few!


Purpose

Purpose

  • Grades

  • Options


Understanding

Understanding

  • Glossaries

  • Appropriate texts

  • Challenging them to go beyond their comfort zone (esp. In sixth form)

  • Buy what they want – Amazon orders.


Glob pell

Glob Pell!

  • Igtheukazzediggromble. Vig un dinned ig glob pell.

  • “Ac!” un kimmed

  • What did the theuk do?

  • What did the theuk do then?

  • What colour was the pell?

  • What did the theuk say?


Availability

Availability

  • Room 17

  • LRC

  • Kindle

  • Local Libraries/Museums/Archives

  • History Today on-line


Emulation

Emulation

  • Be seen with a book – Chris and Caesar!

  • Use books

  • Talk about books

  • Be seen enjoying books


The school athens poole

Available

Interest

Useful

Resilience

Comprehend

Scholarship and Achievement

Evaluate

Marking

Cogent

Comfortable

Synthesis

Fluent

Discursive


The school athens poole

REFLECTING


Critical thinking as structure

Critical Thinking | AS Structure

Teaching units

and Assessment method and weighting

F501 Introduction to Critical Thinking

This unit provides an introduction to the important skills in Critical Thinking. It also covers the area of credibility and recognises that the plausibility of an argument is influenced by its origin, be that a person or an organisation.

F502 Assessing and Developing Argument

This unit covers a wide range of argument components building on the skills developed in Unit 1. Analysing and evaluating arguments including assessing strengths and weaknesses, and writing your own original arguments in response to stimulus material.


Icraf

ICRAF

  • Issue

  • Conclusion

  • Reasons

  • Assumptions

  • Flaws

  • Good to start them with articles – History Review, then History Today, then into ‘proper books’


Rival causes

Rival Causes

  • “After carefully conditioning a flea to jump out of a box following the presentation of a loud noise, the researcher removed the first pair of legs to see what effect this had. Observing that the flea was still able to perform the task, the scientists removed the second pair of legs. Once again noting no difference in performance, the researcher removed the final pair of legs and found the jumping behaviour no longer occurred. Thus, the investigator wrote in his notebook, “when all legs have been removed from a flea, it will no longer be able to hear.”

  • Huck and Sandler Rival Hypotheses


Credibility criteria

Credibility Criteria

C

R

A

V

E

N

CORROBORATION

REPUTATION

ABILITY TO SEE

VESTED INTEREST

EXPERTISE

NEUTRALITY


Independent project year 9 start them early

Independent ProjectYear 9Start them early!!


The school athens poole

  • 1. Designing a Question

  • Must be on a topic not covered in the Year 8-9 syllabus.

  • It must involve answering a question where there is an element of debate.

  • It must be on a topic where the information is readily available.

  • 2. Form of the Project

  • It must present an answer to the question which shows consideration of different viewpoints and opinions

  • It must contain a written part which may be word processed.

  • It may contain a film, powerpoint or model to help illustrate the answer.


The school athens poole

  • 3. Resources

  • You must consult at least FIVE separate sources of information, no more than three of which can be websites.

  • You should choose a range of sources including: books, websites, magazines, journals, museums, oral histories, pictures and artefacts.

  • You must EVALUATE at least two (and preferably all) of the sources you use.

  • You should aim to use PRIMARY and SECONDARY sources.

  • 4. Scope

  • You will have five lessons and two homeworks – a total of seven hours – in which to complete the task.

  • You may choose any subject and title so long as it is approved by your teacher.

  • You may wish to consider attempting to cover an aspect of the First World War to contribute to an entry in the Western Front Association prize competition or other prizes.


Guide to writing footnotes and bibliographies

Guide to writing footnotes and bibliographies

  • Footnotes

  • Should be numbered and arranged at the bottom of each side (not at the end). They should not be used as a means of working in added content or description but merely to provide the reference for a source.

  • If word processing use Microsoft Word footnoting system – if not in italics to differentiate between text and footnote.

  • In following form

  • A.J.P.Taylor, Bismarck, London, 1958 p.125

  • Bibliographies

  • These should be established in the same format as footnotes but listed at the end of the work.


Self evaluation

Self-evaluation


The school athens poole

  • 5. Assessment

  • You will complete a self-assessment at the end and will also peer-assess another two projects providing advice for their authors. The project will then be marked by your teacher.


Peer and teacher evaluation

Peer and Teacher Evaluation


Then hopefully year 13 is not such a leap

Then, hopefully, Year 13 is not such a leap.


Marking grid

Marking Grid


Nazi rise to power

Nazi Rise to Power

  • Using pp.154-55 in Hite and Hinton suggest what the extreme reasons might be at either end and then where the other views are on the continuum.

  • Do any not fit neatly into the pattern? Why not?


Coursework research diary 2011 12

Coursework Research Diary 2011-12


Breakdown of the skills required by a2 coursework

Breakdown of the Skills Required by A2 Coursework

  • 1. Comprehension Candidates must understand the thrust of the historians’ views. They should be able to see which views are similar to each other and which differ.

  • 2. Interpretation. They must be able to see how the views are relevant to the key issue.

  • 3. Evaluation. They should be able to offer a supported judgement about the interpretations based on contextual knowledge which leads to an overall judgement about the key issue.

  • 4. Synthesis – candidates should be able to bring together relevant information from different passages and combine these with their own knowledge to offer sustained support for overall (synoptic) judgement


Guide to writing footnotes and bibliographies1

Guide to Writing footnotes and bibliographies

  • Footnotes

  • Should be numbered and arranged at the bottom of each side (not at the end). They should not be used as a means of working in added content or description but merely to provide the reference for a source.

  • Use Microsoft Word footnoting system – if not in italics to differentiate between text and footnote.

  • In following form

  • A.J.P.Taylor, Bismarck, London, 1958 p.125

  • Bibliographies

  • These should be established in the same format as footnotes but listed at the end of the work.

  • Heydrich “Wannsee Conference Notes” in Noakes and PridhamNazism 1919-45vol III


Diary usage

Diary Usage


Diary usage1

Diary Usage


The school athens poole

Available

Interest

Useful

Resilience

Comprehend

Scholarship and Achievement

Evaluate

Marking

Cogent

Comfortable

Synthesis

Fluent

Discursive


The school athens poole

DEBATING


Bantering to success

Bantering to Success!


The school athens poole

Where did power lie in Fascist Italy?

  • Was Benito Mussolini an all-powerful dictator who ruled alone?

  • Was he merely the figurehead of the Fascist movement?

  • Did the Italian elite maintain their power over Mussolini?


Where did the power lie

Where did the power lie?

Mussolini

PNF

Elite


Nazi rise to power1

Nazi Rise to Power

  • Using pp.154-55 in Hite and Hinton suggest what the extreme reasons might be at either end and then where the other views are on the continuum.

  • Do any not fit neatly into the pattern? Why not?


The school athens poole

Available

Interest

Useful

Resilience

Comprehend

Scholarship and Achievement

Evaluate

Marking

Cogent

Comfortable

Synthesis

Fluent

Discursive


The school athens poole

WRITING


Hierarchy of skiills

Hierarchy of skiills

  • Comprehension

  • Interpretation

  • Evaluation

  • Synthesis


The school athens poole

Available

Interest

Useful

Resilience

Comprehend

Scholarship and Achievement

Evaluate

Marking

Cogent

Comfortable

Synthesis

Fluent

Discursive


The school athens poole

REVIEWING


Marking grid1

Marking Grid


The school athens poole

Available

Interest

Useful

Resilience

Comprehend

Scholarship and Achievement

Evaluate

Marking

Cogent

Comfortable

Synthesis

Fluent

Discursive


The ideal applicant1

The Ideal Applicant ?

  • Independenceof thought

  • Intellectual adaptability and flexibility.

  • Serious and mature about learning.

  • Able to ‘gut an argument’ and synthesise.

  • How might we facilitate those qualities?


Assessing an article

Assessing an Article

  • Philip Hensher – “Even your pet rabbit could pass an A-level”

  • Identify the structure of the argument

  • What are the flaws and assumptions?

  • What are the strengths and weaknesses?

  • Could you construct a reasoned counter-argument?


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