parenting in south african mothers with a history of family violence
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Parenting in South African mothers with a history of family violence

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 22

Parenting in South African mothers with a history of family violence - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 119 Views
  • Uploaded on

Parenting in South African mothers with a history of family violence. Shereen Moolla and Catherine L. Ward Department of Psychology University of Cape Town. UCT’s Safety and Violence Initiative ( SaVI ). Engineering and the Built Environment: Town planning Humanities:

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Parenting in South African mothers with a history of family violence' - albina


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
parenting in south african mothers with a history of family violence

Parenting in South African mothers with a history of family violence

ShereenMoolla and Catherine L. Ward

Department of Psychology

University of Cape Town

uct s safety and violence initiative savi
UCT’s Safety and Violence Initiative (SaVI)
  • Engineering and the Built Environment:
    • Town planning
  • Humanities:
    • Anthropology; linguistics; film & media studies; psychology; religious studies; social development; sociology
  • Health sciences:
    • Forensic medicine; Gender, Health & Justice Research Unit; primary health care directorate; psychiatry; public health; surgery
  • Law
    • Law, Race & Gender Research Unit; criminology; public law
this presentation
This presentation
  • Some background on intimate partner violence and child maltreatment in South Africa
  • Family violence and parenting
  • Methodology for our study
  • Findings:
    • Demographics
    • Mothers’ histories of family violence
    • Mothers’ parenting
    • Children’s behaviour
    • Risk and protective factors
    • Relationships among variables
  • Interpretations and implications
thanks to
Thanks to:
  • Nicia de Nobrega, Abigail Miles and IngeWessels
  • The SaartjieBaartman Centre, REACH, the New World Foundation, Self-Help Mannenberg, Carehaven, the Westlake Community Centre, Place of Hope, Village Care, and the Islamic Resource Foundation of South Africa
  • The UCT University Research Committee and the National Research Foundation
intimate partner violence in sa
Intimate partner violence in SA
  • 8.8% of men working in the Cape Town municipality report IPV against a partner in the last year (Abrahams et al., 2006)
  • At least half of female homicide victims are killed by their intimate partners (Seedat et al., 2009):
    • In 1999, this was therefore at least 1,899 women, or 12.4 per 100,000
    • The rate of homicide for women (all causes) is 6x the average rate worldwide
child maltreatment in south africa
Child maltreatment in South Africa
  • 44.6% of the homicides due to CAN
  • 35.7% of these due to abandonment in the first week after birth
  • 74% of the CAN homicides among children aged 0-4

Mathews et al., 2012

consequences of family violence
Consequences of family violence
  • Increased depression and anxiety
  • Increased substance misuse
  • Internalised model of violence as a way to solve problems
risk and protection for parenting
Risk and protection for parenting

Child behavioural problems

methodology
Methodology
  • Mothers were recruited from NGOs serving women across Cape Town
  • Inclusion criteria:
    • Women with a child aged 3-8
    • The child’s behaviour concerned mother
    • Had not received any parenting intervention
  • Interviewed 215 women, excluded 12:
    • 4 had children > 8
    • 6 had too much missing data
    • 2 had either a “yes” or a “no” response set
measures
Measures
  • Demographics
  • CTS-2 - intimate partner violence
  • ICAST-R - history of childhood abuse
  • PC-CTS - parent/child conflict
  • ECBI - child behaviour problems
  • PSOC - parent competence
  • PSI - parental stress
  • GHQ - maternal mental health
  • ASSIST - substance misuse
  • Duke Social Support Scale
demographics
Demographics
  • Mean age: 32.4 years old.
  • Marital status: mostly single (46.80%).
  • Language: mostly Afrikaans and isiXhosa (38.42 % and 42.37%) respectively.
  • Children: 65% had more than one child
  • 82.76% were unemployed
  • Education: 62.56% of the participants had not completed high school
  • Housing:
    • 53.21% participants lived in formal housing
    • 16.26% l in outbuildings in someone’s backyard
    • 8.87% in shacks
    • 20.20% in flats
  • 13% of the women interviewed were living in shelters for abused women at the time of the interview.
poverty
Poverty
  • Access to electricity, a phone, a television and a private motor-car: 12.32% had access to all four commodities.
  • Food security: 72.91% had ‘run out of money to buy food at least once that year’
  • 34.48% ‘had to go to bed hungry sometimes’
  • 81% received the child support grant
relationships among variables
Relationships among variables
  • Higher maternal age was associated with child behaviour problems
  • Running out of money for food was associated with child behaviour problems
  • Getting income from work was associated with child behaviour problems
  • Mothers’ histories of family violence were significantly associated with child behaviour problems
    • This relationship is mediated by parental stress, parent-child conflict and parental competence
    • But not by maternal mental health, substance misuse, or social support
slide21

Parental Stress

CR=4.841

CR = 10.308

CR =2.992

FamilyViolence

CR =2.152

Child Behaviour Problems

Parent/Child Conflict

CR = 2.040

Parental Incompetence

2 = 8.683; df = 6; p = 0.192; CFI = 0.964; TLI = 0.986; RMSEA = 0.047 (0.000 , 0.110)

implications
Implications
  • If women seek help for parenting, ask about their histories of family violence
  • If women seek help for family violence, ask about their children’s wellbeing
  • Prevent child maltreatment and intimate partner violence
  • Programmes that boost parental competence – parent training programmes – may well reduce parental stress and improve child behaviour
ad