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Preparing for TAKS Middle and High School Science Across a science teacher’s desk . . . Describe momentum. “ Something you give a person when they are going away.” Where is the equator? “The equator is a managerie lion running around the Earth through Africa.”

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Preparing for TAKSMiddle and High School Science


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Across a science teacher’s desk . . .

Describe momentum.

“Something you give a person when they are going away.”

Where is the equator?

“The equator is a managerie lion running around the Earth through Africa.”

Describe the body parts we have studied.

“The body consists of three parts—the brainum, the borax, and the adominable cavity. The brainum contains the brain, the borax contains the heart and the lungs, and the adominable cavity contains the bowels, of which there are five: a, e, i, o, and u.”


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Today’s Science Educators Can Be Proud of:

Did You Know?

  • Higher scores on Science TAAS

  • Increased physics enrollment

  • Increased Advanced Placement course completion

  • Leadership in science safety

  • Increased funding for professional development

  • Forming alliances


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The Landscape of Science in Texas

  • TEKS-based TAAS Spring 2001 Grade 8 SciencePassing Rate

    • All Students 91.8%

    • African American 82.5%

    • Hispanic 83.5%

    • White 97.5%

    • Economically Disadvantaged 85.9%

  • Biology End-of-Course Spring 2001 Passing Rate

    • All Students 80%

    • African American 68%

    • Hispanic 68%

    • White 92%

    • Economically Disadvantaged 67%



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SB 4: Student Success Initiative

HB 1144: Three credits of science

Legislative Highlights

  • Beginning freshmen 2004-2005 (Class of 2008)

  • Recommended High School Graduation Plan becomes the

  • minimum requirement for students

Federal Legislation: No Child Left Behind Act

of 2001 includes science requirements.


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Science Assessments

Mandated by 76th Legislature in June 1999: Senate Bill 103

  • Elementary test will be given in English and Spanish at Grade 5.

  • Grades 10 and 11 will include “at least biology and integrated chemistry and physics.”

THE TEACHING AND LEARNING

OF SCIENCE TAKES ON A NEW

DIMENSION.


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What’s new for biology teachers?

  • Biology I is now a required course for all Texas students.

  • Districts are considering the maturity level of students taking biology.

  • The natural integration of chemistry, physics, and earth science concepts will be assessed; biology teachers need to integrate concepts.

  • Biological concepts are emphasized.


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What’s new for IPC teachers?

  • IPC has taken on a new importance!

  • IPC teachers need to integrate chemistry and physics.

  • IPC teachers need to be well prepared for the IPC curriculum—the TEKS.

  • Lab and field experiences take on greater emphasis.

  • New instructional materials will be available in the 2002-03 school year.


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What’s new for chemistry and physics teachers?

  • Chemistry and physics educators must be aware of concepts taught in kindergarten through IPC!

  • IPC is not a mandatory course for all students.

  • More students will be enrolling in three and four years of science.

  • A natural integration of biological, physical, and earth science concepts is needed.

  • A huge increase in numbers of students will enroll in chemistry and physics.

  • More diverse students will enroll in chemistry and physics courses.

  • Laboratory and field experiences are critical; students learn best what they experience.

  • There will be new textbooks (AP and IB, too!) in 2002-03 school year.


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What’s new for Environmental Science teachers?

  • Environmental Science will have increased enrollment as students enroll in three and four years of science.

  • Environmental Science AP is an excellent course for all types of students.

  • The GLOBE Initiative will enhance Environmental Science.

  • The natural integration of biological, physical, and earth science concepts in Environmental Science is vital.

  • New textbooks will be available in the 2002-03 school year.


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What’s new for GMO, Aquatic Science, and Astronomy teachers?

  • Courses that integrate biological, physical, and earth science concepts will see enrollment increases!

  • More students will be enrolling in three and four years of science!

  • The GLOBE Initiative will enhance these courses.

  • Astronomy textbooks are part of Proclamation ’99. To order books, go to the waivers section of the textbook website.


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Science TAKS Timeline teachers?

  • Spring 2002: Field testing (all districts at some level), April 22-May 10

  • Spring 2002: Last administration of the Biology End-of-Course and Grade 8 Science tests

  • Spring 2002-03: Science TAKS


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TAKS Science Test Format teachers?

  • Clear illustrations when needed

  • Items come from the TEKS

  • Types of questions:

    • Multiple choice

    • Cluster items

    • Griddable items


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Student Tools for Science TAKS teachers?

At all levels:

  • Metric ruler

    Grades 10 and 11 :

  • Periodic table

  • Formula chart

  • Calculators


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Calculators teachers?

  • Purchase is a local decision.

  • Science teachers need to be included in the purchase of calculators.

  • Science students must have access to at least a four-function calculator with a square root key.


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TAKS Specifications teachers?

Texas Education Agency Mathematics Department suggests:

  • Each student must have a graphing calculator during testing.

  • Hand-held microcomputers or laptop computers may not be used.

Science and mathematics teachers need to coordinate

calculator instruction!


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Science TAKS teachers?

assesses in metric

measurement.

Formulas must be applied—

not memorized.



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What’s New? will be stressed.

  • Cluster items

  • Griddable items


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What are [bracketed] items? will be stressed.

The student expectation has been presented in its entirety for two reasons: to clarify the link to the curriculum and to provide background information for test items. However,bracketed text will not be specifically tested on TAKS.


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Where did the TAKS objectives will be stressed.come from?

  • TEKS: non-negotiable

  • National and statewide educator and science expert committees choice of “most essential” TEKS

  • Survey results


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Grade 10 will be stressed.

Science

TAKS

Griddable

Item


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Grade 10 will be stressed.

Science

TAKS

Cluster Item


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Grade 10 Cluster, Questions will be stressed.


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Please Note… will be stressed.

  • Science items were chosen as preliminary, representative samples.

  • Sample items have not gone through an extensive educator review process.

  • These items have not been field tested.

  • The sample items in the Information Booklets will not be on the actual science assessments.


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Middle school educators need to know: will be stressed.

Based on SB 103, there will no longer be a Grade 8 science assessment after spring 2002.

This does not mean that science at Grades 6–8 is no longer important! In fact, it will be even more important to strengthen the 6–8 program to ensure success at Grades 10 and 11.


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High school educators need to know: will be stressed.

  • Biology is now a required course for all students in Texas.

  • Students are required to take the IPC course or the chemistry and physics courses to prepare for TAKS.

  • For all graduation plans, students are encouraged to take the biology, chemistry, and physics sequence.


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Grade 10 Science TAKS will be stressed.

TAKS OBJECTIVES: KS’s SE’s

Science Processes:

1. The Nature of Science 3 7

Science Concepts:

2. Biological Concepts 4 6

3. Biology Ecological Concepts 4 6

4. IPC Chemistry Concepts 3 6

5. IPC Physics Concepts 3 6TOTAL 17 31


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Objective 1—Nature of Science will be stressed.(Biology and IPC process skills)

  • 40% field and laboratory

    TEXAS SAFETY HANDBOOK

  • Scientific methods

  • Critical thinking skills and scientific problem solving


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Objective 2—Organization of Living Systems (Biology I) will be stressed.

  • Biology 4 (B) Cellular processes

  • Biology 6 (A,C,D) Genetics

  • Biology 8 (C) Classification

  • Biology 10 (A) Living systems


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Objective 3—Interdependence of Organisms and the Environment (Biology I)

  • Biology 4 (C,D) Cell structure and function and diseases caused by viruses, diseases, bacteria

  • Biology 7 (B) Biological evolution

  • Biology 12 (B,E) Ecosystems

  • Biology 13 (A) Plants


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Objective 4—Structures and Properties of Matter (IPC) Environment (Biology I)

  • IPC 7 (A,E) Matter and its components

  • IPC 8 (A,C) Changes in matter

  • IPC 9 (A,D) Solution chemistry


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Objective 5—Motion, Forces, and Energy (IPC) Environment (Biology I)

  • IPC 4 (A,B) Force and motion

  • IPC 5 (A) Effects of waves

  • IPC 6 (A,B,F) Energy transformations


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Grade 11 Science TAKS Environment (Biology I)

TAKS OBJECTIVES: KS’s SE’s

Science Processes:

1. The Nature of Science 3 7

Science Concepts:

2. Biology Concepts 4 7

3. Biology Ecological Concepts 5 8

4. IPC Chemistry Concepts 3 7

  • IPC Physics Concepts 3 7

    TOTAL 18 36


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Objective 1—Nature of Science (IPC and Biology I) Environment (Biology I)

  • 40% field and laboratory

    TEXAS SAFETY HANDBOOK

  • Scientific methods and inquiry

  • Critical thinking skills and scientific problem solving


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Objective 2—Organization of Living Systems (Biology I) Environment (Biology I)

  • Biology 4 (B) Cell parts and processes

  • Biology 6 (A,B,C) Genetics

  • Biology 8 (C) Current classification

  • Biology 10 (A,B) Living systems


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Objective 3—Organization of Living Systems (Biology I) Environment (Biology I)

  • Biology 4 (C,D) Cellular processes

  • Biology 7 (A,B) Evolution

  • Biology 9 (D) Metabolic processes and energy transfers

  • Biology 12 (B,E) Ecosystems

  • Biology 13 (A) Plants


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Objective 4—Structures and Properties of Matter (IPC) Environment (Biology I)

  • IPC 7 (A,D) Matter and its components

  • IPC 8 (A,C) Changes in matter

  • IPC 9 (A,B,D) Solution chemistry


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Objective 5—Motion, Forces, and Energy Environment (Biology I)(IPC)

  • IPC 4 (A,B,D) Force and motion

  • IPC 5 (B) Effects of waves

  • IPC 6 (A,B,D) Energy transformations


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Science TAKS Environment (Biology I)

Grade 11

Objective 1

Nature of Science

Skill: Ability to

gain information

from graphs


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Science TAKS Environment (Biology I)

Grade 11

Objective 2

Biology 6(b)

Understanding models,

structures, and

molecules involved in

a physiological

process (protein synthesis)


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Science TAKS Environment (Biology I)

Grade 11

Objective 1

Nature of Science


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Science TAKS Environment (Biology I)

Grade 11

Objective 5

IPC 5(B)

Concept:

How images are

formed and

light travels in a

straight line


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Science TAKS Grade 11, Objective 3 Environment (Biology I)

Students need to see different examples of pyramids.

Ecosystems remain stable if lower

trophic levels are smaller than higher levels.


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Science Course Sequence Environment (Biology I)

  • Students in the minimum high school program typically take IPC and Biology I.

  • Students in either the minimum or recommended program may choose to take the separate Chemistry I and Physics I courses instead of IPC.


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Please Remember— Environment (Biology I)

  • The Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC) course is not mandatory for all students.

  • IPC was intended to be an entry level course. It is not recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12.

    “Prerequisite: None. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9 and 10.”


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All TEKS are required! Environment (Biology I)

  • The TEKS outline what all students must know and be able to do.

  • Some student expectations are not tested, yet they may be critical for student understanding.


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The Role of Untested TEKS in Student Understanding Environment (Biology I)

Knowledge and Skill Statement

The student knows the significance of plants in the

environment. The student is expected to:

Not Tested

  • 13 (B) survey and identify methods of reproduction,growth, and development of various types of plants

    Tested

  • 13 (A) evaluate the significance of structural and physiological adaptations of plants to their environments


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The Importance of “Strands” Environment (Biology I)

  • The Science TEKS contain “strands” that connect broad themes across the grade levels.

  • Certain themes permeate science.

  • These strands are evident in TAKS objectives.


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An Example of a Strand Environment (Biology I)

  • Grade 11: Biology 9(D)

    Analyze the flow of matter and energy through different trophic levels.

  • Grade 10 Biology 12(D)

    Investigate interactions in an ecosystem.

  • Grade 7.12(B)

    Observe how organisms, including producers, consumers and decomposers, live together in an environment and use existing resources.

  • Elementary 2.9

    Compare the ways living organisms depend on each other and their environments.


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The Process Skills: What Are They? Environment (Biology I)

  • Scientific methods

  • Laboratory and field investigations

  • Critical thinking

The student must do these processes . . . NOT just read about them!


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Laboratory and Field Requirements Environment (Biology I)

All high school science courses are required to

meet the 40% laboratory and field requirement.

  • 19 TAC Chapter 74

  • Section 74.3 (b)(2)(C)


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Laboratory and Field Investigations Environment (Biology I)

Students conducting field, classroom, and

laboratory investigations should consider:

  • Safety

  • Use and conservation of resources

  • Disposal and recycling


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Safety Environment (Biology I)

  • Is a prime consideration

  • Is taught through specific lessons

  • Is reinforced through icons and reminders

  • Has applications that change with the setting of each investigation


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Scientific Methods Environment (Biology I)

Using scientific methods during field and

laboratory investigations:

  • Plan and implement investigative procedures

  • Collect data and make measurements

  • Organize, analyze, make inferences from data

  • Communicate


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Differences in Investigations Across Environment (Biology I)the Grades

  • Field

  • Classroom

  • Laboratory


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Critical Thinking Environment (Biology I)

The student uses critical thinking and scientific

problem solving to make informed decisions.


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Science Is Moving Environment (Biology I)


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Science Instructional Materials Adoption Environment (Biology I)

Textbooks and instructional materials are now aligned to the TEKS, which are the basis of the TAKS.

  • High School Science

    • Integrated Chemistry and Physics

    • Chemistry

    • Physics

    • Environmental Systems

    • Astronomy

  • Advanced Placement

    • Chemistry

    • Physics

    • Environmental Science

  • Biology: (AP, IB) part of Proclamation 2001


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Documentation of TEKS Instruction Environment (Biology I)

Students on the Minimum High School Graduation plan, the Recommended High School Plan, or the Distinguished Achievement Program should haveadequate preparationand multiple opportunities to learnthe concepts to be tested at Grades 10 and 11 on the Science TAKS.


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How to Prepare for TAKS Environment (Biology I)

  • Teachers must be given the tools necessary to teach the TEKS.

  • Teachers must be given professional development opportunities.

  • Vertical articulation of what students learn, when they learn those concepts, and how they will learn them best is crucial.

  • TAAS/TAKS prep items and review of endless test worksheets are counterproductive.


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Educators need to: Environment (Biology I)

  • Know and understand the depth and complexity of the TEKS.

  • Learn the knowledge statements and student expectations and what they mean.

  • ALWAYS read and judge the presence of the student expectation as it relates to the knowledge statement.


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The Secret of Success Environment (Biology I)

Teaching the TEKS will ensure student success on

the TAKS.

Curriculum aligned with the TEKS

Classroom instruction

aligned to the TEKS

TEKS

Textbooks

and instructional

materials aligned

to the TEKS

Assessment

aligned with

the TEKS

PDAS and ExCET aligned with TEKS


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Texas Science Education Service Center Network Environment (Biology I)

ESC Region Service Centers

Provide updates,

information, and workshops to help science educators


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Professional Development Environment (Biology I)

Texas Science Center for Professional

Development at ESC IV

  • MODEL: Trainer-of-Trainer Model

  • COMPONENTS: Bridging II TAKS—3-day institutes for teams (elementary and middle school educators and their administrators)

  • Presented in five sites: Houston, Dallas, Corpus Christi, Austin and San Antonio

  • Products to prepare for TAKS: 3 new charts


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Professional Development Environment (Biology I)

CATS: Comprehensive Assessment

Training in Science

  • Model: Teachers as Leaders

  • Components: Administrator Symposia, Parent Nights, 3-day training

  • Presented in ten sites: Edinburg, Waco, Richardson, Lubbock, Corpus Christi, El Paso, Houston, Kilgore, San Angelo, and San Antonio

  • Products: Lesson templates, A Guide to the TEKS, Texas Atlas for Science Literacy, and coherent assessment techniques


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Science Professional Development Environment (Biology I)

Dana Center Science Professional Development

  • Science Teacher Toolkit: www.tenet.edu/teks/science

  • Science safety training

  • TEXTEAMS: Trainer-of-Trainer Mega-Vistas “Constancy and Change”

  • Biology and IPC Institutes

  • Building a Presence for Science (BAP)

  • Products to prepare for TAKS: Facilities Handbook, 2 TEKS charts, posters

  • Academies with strands for administrators, elementary and secondary teachers

  • Leadership: TASEL


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Texas Regional Collaboratives for Excellence in Science Teaching

  • High quality, sustained professional development in 20 sites around the state

  • Statewide Marco Polo Training, GLOBE training, technology training

  • Teacher-centered science content training

  • ESCs, universities, K-12 schools, and districts

    Each of the 750 teachers involved in the program

    received 105 to 150 hours of professional

    development in physics concepts this year!


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Texas Education Agency Homepage Teaching

www.tea.state.tx.us


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Content Resources: TeachingScience Education Standards

Project 2061

(American Association for the Advancement of Science)

  • Science for All Americans

  • Benchmarks for Science Literacy

    www.aaas.org


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Content Resource: TeachingScience Education Standards

National Science Education

Standards (National Research Council)

www.nsta.org

  • Helps to understand the content that is contained in the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)


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Center for Professional Development and Assessment TeachingAnna McClane713-744-6565

CATS Project Joan Drennan-Taylor210-208-8133

Dana CenterMary Jane Schott512-471-6191

Texas Science Education Leadership Association Barbara ten Brink512-464-5077

Science Teachers Association of Texas www.statweb.org

Texas Regional Collaboratives for

Excellencein Science TeachingJoel Blasingame 512-471-9279

TEA SCIENCE512-463-9556

Chris Castillo-ComerDirector of Science

Irene PickhardtAsst. Dir. of Science Curriculum and Professional Development Division

Phyllis Kirkpatrick

Assessment Division 512-622-2200

Who To Contact:


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