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Openness. Team Extra Credit . Our Research. For our project, we studied the openness section of the Big Five Theory of personality as it relates to Ecuadorian students and students from the US.

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Presentation Transcript
Openness

Openness

Team Extra Credit


Our research
Our Research

For our project, we studied the openness section of the Big Five Theory of personality as it relates to Ecuadorian students and students from the US.

“The Big Five framework of personality traits from Costa & McCrae, 1992 has emerged as a robust model for understanding the relationship between personality and various academic behaviors.[1] The Big Five factors are openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism (common acronyms are OCEAN, NEOAC, or CANOE).”


What is openness
What is openness?

Openness is a general appreciation for art, emotion, adventure, unusual ideas, imagination, curiosity, and variety of experience. People who are open to experience are intellectually curious, appreciative of art, and sensitive to beauty. They tend to be, when compared to closed people, more creative and more aware of their feelings. They are more likely to hold unconventional beliefs. Another characteristic of the open cognitive style is a facility for thinking in symbols and abstractions far removed from concrete experience. People with low scores on openness tend to have more conventional, traditional interests. They prefer the plain, straightforward, and obvious over the complex, ambiguous, and subtle. They may regard the arts and sciences with suspicion or even view these endeavors as uninteresting. Closed people prefer familiarity over novelty; they are conservative and resistant to change.


The questions
The Questions

  • Is original, comes up with new ideas

  • Is curious about many different things

  • Is ingenious, a deep thinker

  • Has an active imagination

  • Is inventive

  • Values artistic, aesthetic experiences

  • Prefers work that is routine (reversed)

  • Likes to reflect, play with ideas

  • Has few artistic interests (reversed)

  • Is sophisticated in art, music or literature


Control groups
Control Groups

  • Survey A- From Ecuador and has lived in Ecuador his/her entire life.

  • Survey B- From Ecuador and has lived abroad for a semester or at least 6 months.

  • Survey C- From the US and has lived in the US his/her entire life.

  • Survey D- From the US and has lived abroad for a semester or at least 6 months.


Hypothesis
Hypothesis

Ecuadorians as a whole will score the higher than students from in the US in openness.

Specifically, Ecuadorians that have lived abroad will have the highest openness score.


Results
Results

Out of a possible 50 points:

  • Survey A- 39.02

  • Survey B- 38.78

  • Survey C – 37.66

  • Survey D- 39.91


Analysis
Analysis

  • Ecuadorians- 38.9

  • US Students- 38.785

    The results were almost identical! Also, the group with the highest openness score was Survey D (students from the US who lived abroad).

    Perhaps students are more open due to the fact that they attend liberal arts schools.


Sources
Sources

  • Poropat, A. E. (2009). "A meta-analysis of the five-factor model of personality and academic performance". Psychological Bulletin135 (2): 322–338.

  • McCrae, R. R. & Costa, P.T. (1987). "Validation of the Five-Factor Model of Personality Across Instruments and Observers". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 52, 81-90.


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