Organization alignment using policy deployment
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 72

Organization Alignment using Policy Deployment PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 126 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Organization Alignment using Policy Deployment. Created with funds from WIRED NW. Organization Alignment and Policy Deployment. After the class today you should be able to: Identify the top goals of your company Understand “break though” goals Produce your own “X” Matrix

Download Presentation

Organization Alignment using Policy Deployment

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Organization Alignment using Policy Deployment

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment and policy deployment

Organization Alignment and Policy Deployment

After the class today you should be able to:

Identify the top goals of your company

Understand “break though” goals

Produce your own “X” Matrix

Know what a “bowler “ is and how it is used

Create actions plans

Develop a countermeasure

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Roots of policy deployment

Roots of Policy Deployment

Called “Hoshin Kanri”

Hoshin- Direction

Kanri- Map or plan

1960’s- Originated in Japan as part of TQC (Total Quality Management)

1980’s- Widely used in Japan

Based on MBO (Management by Objectives) and Plan-Do-Check-act improvement cycles

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Policy Deployment

  • To align all efforts management must translate

  • Goals into Actions

  • Actions must be tracked and measured to assure

  • Results meet Goals

  • This policy deployment process is called

  • HoshinKanri

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Need for alignment

Need for Alignment

Focus change energy on area with the “mass” to move the needle

Align all levels to Corporate Goals

Transform long range plans to actions

Consistent methodology

Drive actions and accountability

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Hoshin kanri harness the power

Hoshin Kanri – Harness the Power

Goals

Results

Actions

Actions

GOAL

OBJECTIVES

Created with funds for WIRED NW

MANAGEMENT CREATES STRATEGIES

SUPERVISORS CREATE ACTION PLANS

ASSOCIATES CREATE RESULTS

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Lean conversion process

Lean Conversion Process

Education-

All levels on Lean Principles

Policy Deployment

Establish key projects, metrics, linkages, accountabilities

Value Stream Mapping

Establishment of future state and work plans

Work plan execution

Lean tool applications

Best practices cross linking

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Strategic Planning:

Linking Long-term Strategic Goals to Current Action Plans

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Strategic Planning Process

  • Assessment: Candid analysis of where you are today

  • Mission: What you do

  • Vision: Where you want to be

  • Strategic Plan: How do we get from where we are to where we want to be?

  • Action Plan: How do you set short-term action plans to get to your long-term goals?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Strategic Planning

How do we bridge the gap from where we are to where we want to be?

Policy Deployment Map

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Policy Deployment

  • Components of a Policy Deployment Statement:

    • Start with a Vision

    • Strategic Results Required

    • Strategic Objectives

    • Near-term Goals

    • Current Action Items

    • Tracking Metrics

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Policy Deployment

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Performance expectation setting

Performance Expectation Setting

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organizational business results

Organizational Business Results

What are some of the desired business results of your organization?

Write down the three most important “business results” expected of your organization.

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Have the same understanding of the expectations

See how all expectations align with the group’s or organization’s goals

Reach agreement that the individual will meet each expectation

“Setting expectations” discussions will be effective when you and individual:

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Making expectations clear

Making Expectations Clear

Draw a picture of a ball……

What are the major questions you would ask me to gain more understanding of what I expected?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

”In God we trust – everybody else bring data”

”You don’t have to change – after all survival isn’t mandatory”

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Smart criteria

SMART Criteria

S

M

A

R

T

Specific

Measurable

Attainable

Relevant

Time Bound

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Smart card activity

SMART Card Activity

Determine if your assigned “goals” meet the SMART criteria

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Continue to

strengthen

relationships

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Performance expectations timing

Performance Expectations & Timing

Visualize a football field…100 yards long

Your “game plan” can take multiple paths…

Overall goal – win the game on the scoreboard

Interim goals – score by quarter, number of first downs, etc.

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Performance expectations timing1

Performance Expectations & Timing

Setting interim goals, with adequate timing and rhythm, is essential to sustain improvement and meet overall goals

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Performance expectations timing2

Performance Expectations & Timing

What “rhythm” is your work group on?

Annual?

Quarterly?

Monthly?

Weekly?

Daily?

Hourly?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Applied goal setting

Applied Goal Setting

Is it S.M.A.R.T.?

How will you measure your success?

Do all of the people on your team have an understanding of the desired outcome?

How will you get their involvement and support (for your stretch goal)?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Daily management

Daily Management

Smaller, incremental, performance expectations

Measure daily – where you ARE vs. where you WANT TO BE

Examples:

Schedule goals

Quality goals

Productivity goals

Safety goals

Inventory goals

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Share best practices

Share Best Practices

Share best practices with others:

How do you set expectations in smaller increments (hourly, daily, by shift)?

How do you measure performance?

What works best to gauge performance?

How do you communicate actual performance?

What doesn’t work? Why not? What are the options?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Hoshin kanri steps

Hoshin Kanri Steps

Establish organizational vision

Develop 3-5 year strategic plan

Develop annual objectives

Deploy/roll down to departments

Departments develop plans and means

Focus deployment – not everyone needs to be involved in everything

Iterative (catchball) nature may take time

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Hoshin kanri steps1

Hoshin Kanri Steps

Implementation of plans

Review progress regularly

Annual review

Drop or continue incomplete policies

Check results

What caused us to miss targets

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Relationship between strategic plan pd

Key Deliverable from Strategic Planning:

Top Level Policy Deployment

Relationship Between Strategic Plan & PD

WorldClassPerf.In: QDC&S

VOC

Strategic

Plan

Policy

Deployment

Breakthroughs

Created with funds from WIRED NW


7 phase policy deployment process

7 Phase Policy Deployment Process

Establish Organizational Mission

PLANNING

Strategic Planning/ Develop 3-5Year Breakthrough Objectives

Develop Annual BreakthroughObjectives and ImprovementPriorities

Self-Diagnosis

Deploy Improvement Priorities

Implement ImprovementPriorities

IMPLEMENTATION

Root Cause Countermeasures

REVIEW

Monthly Review

Annual Review

Annual Review

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Critical thinking process ctp

Critical Thinking Process (CTP)

Step 1 : WHAT

Breakthrough Thinking

Step 2 : HOW FAR

Annual Breakthroughs

Step 3 : HOW

Identify Key Driver Process

Step 4 : HOW MUCH/WHEN

Determine Measures & Track

Step 5 : WHO

Identify Key Resources &Deploy

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Who do you compare your company and its performance to

Who do you compare your company and its performance to?

Competitors

Industry Standards

Best in Class

World Class

How do you get to be World Class?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Ctp step 1 what breakthrough thinking

CTP Step 1 WHAT? Breakthrough Thinking

World-Class

Breakthrough

Objective

Best-In-Class

IndustryStandard

GAP

Current

Situation

Current Situation

Breakthrough Thinking Drives to World Class

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Ctp step 2 how far identify first year breakthrough objective

CTP Step 2 HOW FAR? Identify First Year Breakthrough Objective

Breakthrough

Objective

Yr 3

Annual BT Objectives Yr 3

Yr 2

Annual BT Objectives Yr 2

Yr 1

Annual BT Objectives Yr 1

Current Situation

Identify First Year Breakthrough Objective

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Ctp step 3 how identify key driver processes

CTP Step 3 HOW?Identify Key Driver Processes

Annual Breakthrough

Objective

Improvement

Priority

Why?

Why?

GAP

Why?

Why?

Current Situation

Why?

Identify Key Driver Processes

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Ctp step 4 how much when determine measures track

CTP Step 4 HOW MUCH/WHEN? Determine Measures & Track

100

0

Determine Measures & Track

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Ctp step 5 who identify key resources deploy

CTP Step 5 WHO? Identify Key Resources & Deploy

100%

100%

17%

Resource A

3%

Team B

Current

Resources

20%

Relative

Impact On

Improvement Priorities

20%

Resource C

40%

Resource D

Team E

0%

0%

Identify Key Resources & Deploy

Created with funds from WIRED NW


What is a breakthrough

What Is A Breakthrough?

  • Represents SIGNIFICANTchange in processimprovement, especially as seen through the eyes of the customer.

  • Requires the organization to stretch itself.

  • Usually requires multi-functional effortsand teamwork.

  • Usually, no standard or systemexists for this level of breakthrough.

  • Can be characterized as a “Big Win.”

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Breakthrough objective summary checklist

Breakthrough Objective Summary Checklist

  • Are daily management systems in placethat allow us to improve?

  • Is it a stretch goal ?

  • Is it measurable ? (SMART?)

  • Is it linked to Voice of the Customer ?

  • Will it provide significant competitive advantage?

  • Does it require multi-functional involvement?

  • Will it result in a new standard and/or system?

  • Is the answer to how to do it unknown?

  • Have you checked that no problems exist in other areas that need to be fixed first?

  • When we accomplish the above objectives, does the customer/shareholderbenefit?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Annual breakthrough objective checklist

Annual Breakthrough Objective Checklist

Did you consider the pace of meeting the 3 yr breakthrough when developing the annual objective??

Does it divide the 3-5 Year Breakthroughinto annual amounts?

Does it quantifythe first year goal?

Is it still a stretchgoal?

When we accomplish the annual objective, does the customer/shareholderbenefit?

Will it provide significant competitive advantage?

Does it require multi-functionalinvolvement?

Will it result in a new standard and/or system?

Is the answer to how to do it unknown?

Have you checked that no problems exist in other areas that need to be fixed first?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Effective Top Level Improvement Priorities Are:

  • Process Oriented

    • Should lead to the creation of sustainable, results-oriented processes… not short-term tasks.

  • Focused

    • Meets Current or Emerging Customer Needs

    • Limited to a Critical Few

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Effective Top Level Improvement Priorities Are:

Clear

  • Easy to Communicate

  • Simple Flow of Logic

  • Team understands what is to be achieved and why

If you can’t easily communicate…

Go back, Simplify, Clarify

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Effective Top Level Improvement Priorities Are:

Measurable

  • The objective you write must be something that can be measured

But, not a Measure!

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Top level improvement priorities contribute to the annual breakthrough objective

Top Level Improvement Priorities Contribute to the Annual Breakthrough Objective

We apply problem solving techniques to identify the key process that drives the improvement priority.

This will enable us to reach our overall annual breakthrough objective.

Improvement

Priority

Annual Breakthrough

Objective

Why?

Why?

GAP

Why?

Why?

Why?

Current Situation

Identify Key Driver Processes

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Top level improvement priority checklist

Top Level Improvement Priority Checklist

1. Does it lead to creation of a sustainable process?

2. Does it lead to creation of a results-oriented process?

3. Does it meet current or emerging customer needs?

4. Is it easy to communicate?

5. Does it demonstrate a simple flow of logic?

6. Is it measurable, but not a measure itself?

7. Does it enable the implementation of a process which exceeds budget targets, if and where applicable?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

100

0

Identify Targets To Improve

For Each Improvement Priority

  • Targets aremeasuresof the effectiveness of a given process

  • Think in terms of process capability (statistics)

  • Improvement Priorities tell “how”, Targets tell “how much” & “by when”

Determine

Measures & Track

  • Typically a from:___to:___by:___ statement

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Targets to improve checklist

Targets to Improve Checklist

  • Does it track progress toward full implementation of the Improvement Priority?

  • Can it be broken down into at least monthly progress increments?

  • Does it exceed budgettargets?

  • Does it track progress toward achieving the Annual Objective?

  • Does it reflect if the Improvement Priority has an impact on the Annual Objective?

  • Does it measure results, rather than action plan milestones?

  • Is it easy to calculate and communicate?

  • Does it demonstrate a simple flow of logic?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Critical thinking process the top level pd matrix

HOW

HOWFAR

HOW MUCH

All itemsare listedin priority orderstarting from the center

Top Level

Improvement

Priorities

Annual

Breakthrough

Objectives

Targets

to Improve

3-5 Year Breakthrough Objectives

WHAT

Critical Thinking Process & the Top Level PD Matrix

WHO

RESOURCES

= Primary Responsibility

= Secondary Responsibility

OWNER

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Complete Top Level PD Matrix

The whole picture of your company on one sheet of paper!

3- HOW

Use dots to show relationship of Targets and Resources to the Improvement Priority

5- WHO

Use dots to show relationship of Improvement Priorities to Annual Objectives

Top Level

Improvement

Priorities

NOTE: Only Solid dots on a resource deploy to the next level

Annual

Breakthrough

Objectives

2- HOW FAR

Targets

to Improve

3-5 Year Breakthrough Objectives

4- HOW MUCH

RESOURCES

= Primary Responsibility

1- WHAT

= Secondary Responsibility

OWNER

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Linkage on the matrix

Linkage on the Matrix

Dots showlinkage fromTarget back to Breakthroughfor that level

Top Level

ImprovementPriorities

AnnualBreak-throughObjective

TargetsToImprove

3-5 Year

Breakthroughs

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Policy Deployment

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Points to remember about the matrix

Danaher Business System Office - Policy Deployment 1998

Resources

l

Primary Responsibility

m

Secondary Responsibility

Points to Remember about the Matrix

  • As soon as a solid dot is placed above a resource, that resource will get a lower level matrix or an action plan.

  • Clear circles indicate support resources. They do NOT get a lower level matrix or action plan unless they get a solid dot on another matrix.

  • The dots are to be used as a sanity check

  • The ImprovementPriority is deployedto the lower levelmatrix or an actionplan

TOP LEVEL - Company

Top Level

Improvement

Priorities

Targets

to

Improve

Annual

Breakthrough

Objectives

3-4 year

Breakthrough

Objectives

SECOND LEVEL - Plant

Second Level Policy Deployment

Second Level

Improvement

Priorities

Top Level

Improvement

Priorities

Targets to

Improve

Annual

Breakthrough

Objectives

RESOURCES

l

Primary Responsibility

m

Secondary Responsibility

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Danaher Business System Office - Policy Deployment 1998

Resources

l

Primary Responsibility

m

Secondary Responsibility

Second Level Policy Deployment

Annual

Breakthrough

Objectives

RESOURCES

l

Primary Responsibility

m

Secondary Responsibility

Second Level Policy Deployment

POINT OF IMPACT

RESOURCES

l

Primary Responsibility

m

Secondary Responsibility

Improvement Priorities Cascade to the Point of Impact

TOP LEVEL – Company/Group

Point of Impact - Action Plan The level where root causes are addressed! Action Plans can be initiated out of any matrix level.

TopLevelImprovementPriorities

SECOND LEVEL – Plant/Business

Target to

AnnualBreakthrough Objectives

Improve

3-5 Year

Breakthrough

Objectives

SecondLevelImprovementPriorities

TopLevelImprovementPriorities

Target to

Improve

ROOT CAUSE LEVEL- Sub Plant/Dept

POINT OF IMPACT - ACTION PLANEngineer/Supv

Cascade as many times as

necessary to the

Root Cause Level

ThirdLevelImprovementPriorities

SecondLevelImprovementPriorities

Target to

Improve

TopLevelImprovementPriorities

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Creating Action Plans

Create an Action Plan

For everyImprovement

Priority at the Point of

Impact

Step 4: Identify the impacts on the improvement priority and top level breakthrough objective

Step 1: Determine actions & write on worksheets

Step 3: What is the current status of the action. Color code background as red to show items past due.

Step 2: Record ownership and timing of the actions

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Planned date could become the revised date if there is a change to the original plans

Milestones are discrete events that indicate that action step has occurred

If there are multiple TTI’s (metrics) for a single Improvement Priority, they are listed here in Core Objective

  • Status should be:

  • Complete OR

  • On time OR

  • Past Due OR

  • % complete

These are specific tasks to be accomplished, they are generally in chronological order for simplicity. Use outlining to better communicate.

Shade the month the action step is to be completed – shade several months if needed. Place “x” where activity actually takes place.

The impacts should sum to the improvement priority goal with specific numbers and/or actions

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Notes about Action Plans

  • How long should Action Plans be?

    • Long enough to track progress weekly.

    • Include key actions and kaizen events.

    • No prize for length. Keep brief and to the point.

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Action plan checklist

Action Plan Checklist

Does it “tie” to PD (is the Improvement Priority it “ties” to clear)?

Are all the top-part sections of the Action Plan complete?

Are the Actions clearly documented?

Are there appropriate number of Actions? Litmus test is should be able to track improvement actions on a monthly/weekly basis.

Is the Ownershipof each Action identified?

Is the timingof each Action identified?

Is the impact of each or grouping of Action(s) quantified and is there enough to get you to reach your Objective?

Is the correct timing legend used (plan vs. progress at review)?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Bowling charts

Targets To Improveare entered inpriority order

JOP – Jumping Off Point fromwhich you started tracking the target

YTD ACT – Each month this field getsupdated (is YTD from the monthlyfields located to the right)

Planned targets are established for each month basedon the overall Target to Improve. An actual that is a miss from the plan, is color coded red

Bowling Charts

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Bowling Charts Are Created For All Policy Deployment Matrices

Danaher Business System Office - Policy Deployment 1998

Resources

l

Primary Responsibility

m

Secondary Responsibility

Second Level Policy Deployment

RESOURCES

l

Primary Responsibility

m

Secondary Responsibility

TOP LEVEL

BOWLING CHART

Top Level

Improvement

Priorities

Annual

Target s to

Breakthrough

Improve

Objectives

3-5 year

Breakthrough

Objective

Created with funds from WIRED NW

SECOND LEVEL

BOWLING CHART

2nd Level

Improvement

Priorities

Targets to

Improve

Top Level

Improvement

Priorities

Annual Breakthrough

Objectives


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Each Target Is Copied To The Top Level Bowling Chart

Reduce New Prod. Dev. Cycle

TOP LEVEL

IMPROVEMENTPRIORITIES

TARGET

ANNUALBTOBJECTIVES

Dev. Cycle to 120 Days by 12/95

TO

Increase Market Share to 60%

IMPROVE

Engineering Department

Human Resources Dept.

Production Department

Marketing Department

Materials Department

Finance Department

Sales Department

3-5 YEARBREAKTHROUGHOBJECTIVE

RESOURCES

= Primary Responsibility

= Secondary Responsibility

TOP LEVEL MATRIX

TOP LEVEL BOWLING CHART

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Personal Tracking Report

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

What are Countermeasures?

  • Countermeasures are actions plansdesigned from problem solving techniques designed to bring you back to your PD target

    • Written for any monthlymiss on Policy Deployment

    • Can also be required for KPIs based on the manager’s discretion

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Countermeasure components

Countermeasure Components

  • Format: can use A3 or matrix format

  • Include trend charts, pareto diagrams, or any visual tools to help speak with data and tell the story

  • Must be at Point of Impact

  • Assure the countermeasures are tied to the greater vision

  • Define the root causes and quantify amount of “miss”

  • Focus on the critical few… may not get to 100% of the “miss” in 30 days-Sometimes you will have short-term and long-term countermeasures

  • Clearly define ownership and timing

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Countermeasure key points

Countermeasure Key Points

Know the “tie”

to PD!

May need

More Paretos to

“Peel-back-the

Onion”

Define the Root

Causes and

Quantify amount

Of “Miss”

Run chart of

Plan vs. Actual

Same data from

PD Bowler

Must be at

“Point of

Impact!”

Clearly define

Ownership

And timing!

Focus on the critical few…

May not get to

100% of the

“Miss” in 30 days

Sometimes you

Will have

Short-term and

Long-term CMs

Quantify the

Impact!

Do you have

Enough?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Countermeasures

Countermeasures

  • Having a PD missand having to write countermeasures does not mean that someone has failed

    • PD Targets, by their nature, should be aggressive stretch targets

    • Outstanding organizations will normally be required to write numerous countermeasures each month

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Countermeasures

  • Good countermeasure preparationwill drive an organization to productive self-criticism, more robust systems, closer customer contact, a higher level understanding of the marketplace, etc.

  • Effective Countermeasure development is a team effort. Writing them in a vacuum normally does not yield the best results or plans

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Countermeasure checklist

Countermeasure Checklist

  • Does it “tie” to policy deployment (is the “tie” clear)?

  • Does it have a run chart showing plan versus actual data?

  • Does the Pareto show the whyversus the where (i.e., get to root cause)?

  • Is the Root CauseStatement made with quantified amount of miss?

  • Are the Countermeasures focused on the criticalfew?

  • Are there short-term as well as long-term countermeasures (if appropriate)?

  • Is the Ownershipof each Countermeasure identified?

  • Is the timingof each Countermeasure identified?

  • Is the impactof each Countermeasure quantified and is there enough to get you back to Plan?

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Do a monthly review of your action plan

Do a Monthly Review of Your Action Plan

  • Policy Deployment meetings are held monthly (a meeting for eachPD matrix)

  • Countermeasures are fact based

  • Countermeasures are specific, with due dates and responsibilities listed

  • Problem solving toolsare used to determine countermeasures

  • PD targets are measured frequently enoughto provide adequate data

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Top management s role in policy deployment

Top Management’s Role in Policy Deployment

  • Conduct lively policy deployment sessionsthat test people’s understanding. Information must be fact-based.

  • Evaluate effectiveness of specific projects & action plans

  • Evaluate effectiveness of the overall improvement process

  • Decide when to take action & what typeof action to take

  • Communicate Stretch vs. Budgetand hold associates accountable

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Organization alignment using policy deployment

Summary

  • ASSESSMENT - Take careful stock of where you are today

  • VISION - Decide where you want to be in the future

  • STRATEGIC PLAN - Work out a Policy Deployment Map to bridge the gap from now to your vision

  • AOP - Ensure that current year actions are included in your Annual Operating Plan

  • MEASURE PROGRESS - Establish formal tracking for management team for their short term action items

  • ACCOUNTABILITY - Keep the plan alive by getting monthly strategic updates regarding progress

  • CELEBRATE your victories!

Created with funds from WIRED NW


Independent assignment 2

Independent Assignment #2

  • Meet with your mentor and review the materials discussed in today’s session.

  • Mutually agree on opportunities to apply what was learned today, using as many tools as possible.

  • Bring a completed X matrix to the next session.

Created with funds from WIRED NW


  • Login