Week four
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Week Four. English III 9-12-2011 through 9-16-2011. September 12, 2011 Bell Assignment. Correct MUGS sentence 3 on Set 2 “Alaska…” 9 errors! On FRIDAY , we will have a short MUGS quiz based on sentences from Set 1 and Set 2. . Write-to-Learn.

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Week Four

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Week Four

English III

9-12-2011 through 9-16-2011


September 12, 2011Bell Assignment

  • Correct MUGS sentence 3 on Set 2

    • “Alaska…”

    • 9 errors!

  • On FRIDAY, we will have a short MUGS quiz based on sentences from Set 1 and Set 2.


Write-to-Learn

  • Thinking back to what we read in class last week, write a RESPONSE on a sheet of paper telling me what you LEARNED. Your response must be in paragraph-format with complete sentences.

    • We read William Bradford’s “Of Plymouth Plantation” last week.


Vocabulary

  • No vocabulary list this week!

  • One week off. 


Background Information

  • pg. 38 – FACTS

  • The Indians killed the interpreter for the Puritans; the Puritans killed the murderers; started the war between Wampanoag and the Puritans

  • Chief Metacomet – broke the treaty; “King Philip’s War” – (Colonists called Metacomet “King Philip” because of the association with the evil ruler King Philip)

  • Wampanoag Indians started capturing colonists for ransom for food because they had been pushed off of their hunting grounds by the colonists; They had originally “sold” those grounds, however, they didn’t realize the colonists didn’t allow them to hunt

  • Mary Rowlandson was wife of minister of Lancaster

  • She was in captivity for June-August; she died two years later

  • Attributed everything still to God’s blessing

  • Native Americans were starving – had to resort to eating horses, bugs, bark, bones, frogs, dogs, skunks, rattlesnakes


September 13, 2012Bell Assignment

  • Correct MUGS sentence 4 on Set 2

    • “These…”

    • 5 errors


“from A Narrative of the Captivity” by Mary Rowlandson pg. 40-45

  • The Native Americans threatened to kill her child because it wouldn’t stop crying

  • Mary’s child died – 6 ½ years old, daughter, weakness/wound, starving (Sarah)

  • Saw her 10 year-old daughter (Mary) – who had been sold as a slave for a gun – at another town/village

  • Chief’s wife’s sister’s husband is Mary’s “master”

  • All she had to eat/drink was ONLY cold water

  • Mary and the Indians could communicate

  • She still relies on God (strong Puritan belief)

  • Mary R. has a son – he is still alive


  • Mary was able to go see her son

  • A squaw in her son’s village offered to buy her if only they had money; extremely kind

  • She got lost on her first try to go see him; only a mile away; Indians helped her get “back”; King Philip pointed her in the right direction

  • She was a tailor – she would knit shirts, caps; Indians would pay her in food (bear, horse, peas)

  • She still maintains her faith – even though she’s starving

  • The English army starts chasing the Indians – so the Indians have to flee; cross a river, and Mary’s foot does not get wet (attributes that to a blessing)

  • Crying spell—all the Indians asked her, “are you ok?”


September 14, 2011Bell Assignment

  • Correct MUGS sentence 5 on Set 2

    • “Pocahontas…”

    • 6 errors

    • Saved the life

  • *Reminder: MUGS quiz on Friday!*


MUGS Review

  • Looking at all the corrections we’ve made on Sets 1 and 2, what are some punctuation “rules” we’ve encountered?

    • Use a comma when you need to pause

    • Y changes to I when you make something past tense (marry ---married)

    • “An” goes before a word that starts with a vowel (An Apple)

    • Use hyphens to join words that are one thought

    • Underline movie titles, book titles, newspaper titles

    • Quotation marks are for SHORT works (poems, short stories, one article in a newspaper)

    • Apostrophes for possession (dog’s collar) and contractions (It’s raining – it is; that’s – that is)

    • Colons: right before a list

    • Semi-colons – between complete thoughts (substitute semi-colons where there are periods) ;

    • Use commas in lists (tea, spices, and fabrics)

    • Introduction phrases (As a matter of fact, In the 1960s, Throughout history,) have commas after them

    • Interrupter phrases (Pocahontas, a Disney movie,) are surrounded by commas

    • Use commas when joining sentences with and, but, or (conjunctions)

    • Exclamation points for dramatic phrases/sentences

    • Commas between two descriptive words (adjectives) (finest, funniest movies; determined, courageous believer)

    • There: location, Their: shows possession, They’re: They are


Pg. 42-43 “Literature and History”

  • Text box: “Captivity Narratives”

  • Narratives intensified the negative relationships between N.A. and E.

  • “Shock and Awe” sells!


Take NOTE:

  • Literary Term:

    • Allusion: a reference to something literary, mythological, or historical that the author assumes the reader will know

    • In Rowlandson’s narrative, she makes multiple allusions to Bible stories, comparing her situation to those she has read about in the Bible.


Chief Red Jacket’s speech

  • After you read Chief Red Jacket’s speech, answer the following questions on a sheet of paper:

    • What issues/problems does Chief Red Jacket have with the missionaries forcing the Native Americans to accept Christianity?

    • What do you think about his reasons? Do you agree with what he says? Why or why not? Are there points you disagree with? If so, explain why.

    • Copy a sentence from this text that you think is very important or significant in his speech. Then, explain why you think that point is important.


September 15, 2011Bell Assignment

  • Pick up a copy of Chief Red Jacket’s speech from Mrs. Goad at the classroom door.

  • After you finish reading Chief Red Jacket’s speech, answer the following questions on a sheet of paper (you will turn this in for a grade):

    • What issues/problems does Chief Red Jacket have with the missionaries forcing the Native Americans to accept Christianity?

    • What do you think about his reasons? Do you agree with what he says? Why or why not? Are there points you disagree with? If so, explain why.

    • Copy a sentence from this text that you think is very important or significant in his speech. Then, explain why you think that point is important.


Chief Red Jacket’s Speech

  • Reasons why he will not do what Rev. Cram has asked:

  • Other interesting points he makes:


Timeline

  • Using your textbook and the stories we’ve read thus far, enter them on the timeline you’ve been given.

  • Add quick descriptions/word associations with each entry to remind yourself of what you read in that text.

  • *Keep this timeline throughout the course! It will help you see chronologically what has happened through literature in America.*


September 16, 2011Bell Assignment

  • Study for 3 minutes for MUGS Quiz!

    • Use the review sheet I handed out yesterday AND your Sets 1/2


Pg. 48 “The Southern Planters”

  • What do we learn from this?

    • Different personalities, interests, focus on religion

      • South- secular; Cavaliers (gentlemanly, aristocratic)

      • North – Puritan; said their prayers; devout

    • Different land – south fertile, north not so much

    • South had plantations and more slave work

    • South had a lot of land – were wealthier

    • South – very straightforward about who they were/what they knew


“from The History of the Dividing Line”Pg. 50 – William Byrd


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