Aim how did absolutism lead to a constitutional monarchy in england
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 10

Aim: How did absolutism lead to a constitutional monarchy in England? PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 147 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Aim: How did absolutism lead to a constitutional monarchy in England?. Do Now: Why do these things make it more difficult to establish absolutism in England? Magna Carta (1215 ): Parliament: . I. Stuart Monarchy .

Download Presentation

Aim: How did absolutism lead to a constitutional monarchy in England?

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Aim how did absolutism lead to a constitutional monarchy in england

Aim: How did absolutism lead to a constitutional monarchy in England?

Do Now: Why do these things make it more difficult to establish absolutism in England?

Magna Carta (1215):

Parliament:


I stuart monarchy

I. Stuart Monarchy

  • Elizabeth I dies in 1603 without an heir. Replaced by her cousin James Stuart (king of Scotland), who becomes James I. Tudor Line is over, beginning of the Stuart Line.

    • James I (1603-1625)

    • Charles I (1625-1649)

    • Charles II (1660-1685)

    • James II (1685-1688)


Ii james i 1603 1625

II. James I (1603-1625)

  • Why is he so unpopular?

    • Scottish

    • Lacked interpersonal skills

    • Claims to be an absolute ruler → Offends growing middle class that dominates Parliament


Iii charles i 1625 1649 continues to antagonize parliament

III. Charles I (1625-1649) → Continues to antagonize Parliament

  • Parliament passed the Petition of Right (1628) only Parliament can raise taxes, not the king.

  • To get around this, Charles I disbands Parliament for eleven years (1629-1640), raises money through illegal taxes (Ship money  all people in England have to pay for ships to protect the coast whether they live near the coast or not).

  • Must call Parliament in 1640 to put down revolts in Scotland and Ireland. Parliament refuses to grant him an army, saying they will raise it themselves!


Iv english civil war 1642 1649

IV. English Civil War (1642-1649)

  • Charles feels undermined, raises an army to fight Parliament. Civil War beings!

    King’sArmy (Cavaliers): Nobility, mercenaries.

    Vs.

    Parliament’sArmy (New Model Army / Roundheads): Rag-tag army of merchants with no training. Led by Oliver Cromwell, a member of Parliament and a devout Puritan (English Calvinist)


V england under cromwell 1649 1658

V. England Under Cromwell (1649-1658)

  • The “Rump Parliament” puts Charles I on trial for treason, beheads him in January 1649.

  • Cromwell declares a commonwealth (republican) government. The army prepares a new constitution (Instrument of Government – 1653)

  • Cromwell eventually tears up the Constitution, dismisses Parliament, establishes a military dictatorship called the Protectorate (1653-1658).

    • Strict Puritan morality enforced

    • Religious tolerance for all but Roman Catholics

  • Cromwell dies in 1658


Vi the restoration

VI. The Restoration

  • In 1660, England restores the monarchy, both houses of Parliament and the Anglican Church. Charles II (1660-1685), exiled son of Charles I, becomes the new king.

  • Charles tries to work with Parliament:

    • Establishes the Cabal (members of Parliament who advise the king).

    • Initially goes to Parliament when he needs income.


Vi the restoration1

VI. The Restoration

  • Eventually, Charles II and Parliament clash:

    • Charles is a big spender (why?), Parliament can’t meet his demands for money.

    • Charles II is sympathetic with the Catholics, is moving England back in the Catholic direction!

    • When Parliament learns of this, they pass the Test Act (1673) only members of the Anglican Church (aka Protestants) can vote, hold public office, or assemble for meetings.


Vii reign of james ii glorious revolution

VII. Reign of James II / Glorious Revolution

  • James II (1685-1688)

    • Charles II’s brother

    • Catholic!

    • Strongly Absolutist!

  • James II antagonizes his subjects with absolutist / pro-Catholic policies.

  • 1688: James II’s young wife gives birth to a son (why is this a problem?).

  • Leads to the Glorious Revolution (1688): Parliament offers the throne to James’ Protestant daughter Mary and her Dutch husband, Prince William of Orange. James II realizes he has no support and flees to France.


Ix rise of the english constitutional monarchy

IX. Rise of the English Constitutional Monarchy

  • In 1689, William and Mary accept the English throne directly from Parliament (what does this represent?).

  • English Bill of Rights (1689): Eliminates absolutism, creates a Constitutional (limited) monarchy for England, where the the king must share power with Parliament and there are legal limits on his power. The king is not allowed to

    • Suspend Parliament’s laws

    • Pass taxes without permission from Parliament

    • Interfere with freedom of speech in Parliament


  • Login