Sea turtles
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 14

Sea Turtles PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 180 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Sea Turtles. By: Jordyn. What Are Sea Turtles?. Sea Turtles are turtles found in all the world's oceans except the Arctic Ocean. There are seven living species of sea turtles: flatback, green sea turtle, hawksbill, Kemp’s Ridley, Leatherback, Loggerhead, and Olive Ridley.

Download Presentation

Sea Turtles

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Sea turtles

Sea Turtles

By: Jordyn


What are sea turtles

What Are Sea Turtles?

  • Sea Turtles are turtles found in all the world's oceans except the Arctic Ocean.

  • There are seven living species of sea turtles: flatback, green sea turtle, hawksbill, Kemp’s Ridley, Leatherback, Loggerhead, and Olive Ridley.

  • This is a Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle.


The flatback sea turtle

The Flatback Sea Turtle

  • Size: Adults measure up to 3.25 feet (99 cm).Weight: Adults weigh an average of 198 pounds (90 kg).Diet: Eats sea cucumbers, jellyfish, mollusks, prawns, bryozoans, other invertebrates and seaweed.Habitat: Prefer turbid inshore waters, bays, coastal coral reef and grassy shallows.Nesting: Nests 4 times per season. Lays an average of 50 eggs at a time, but these are quite large. The eggs incubate for about 55 days. When the hatchlings emerge, they are larger than most species of turtles.Range: Very limited. It is found only in the waters around Australia and Papua New Guinea in the Pacific.Status: U.S. - Listed as Endangered.

    Threats to Survival: Sea turtles are threatened with capture, harvesting of eggs, destruction of nesting beaches, ocean pollution, oil spills and entanglement in fishing and shrimp nets.Population Estimate*: About 20,285 nesting females.

  • This is a Flatback sea turtle.


Green sea turtle

Green Sea Turtle

  • Size: Adults are 3.5 to 4 feet in length (76-91 cm). The green turtle is the largest of the Cheloniidae family. The largest green turtle ever found was 5 feet (152 cm) in length and 871 pounds (395 kg).Weight: Adults weigh between 300 to 400 pounds (136-180 kg).Diet: Changes significantly during its life. When less than 8 to 10 inches in length eat worms, young crustaceans, aquatic insects, grasses and algae. Once green turtles reach 8 to 10 inches in length, they mostly eat sea grass and algae, the only sea turtle that is strictly herbivorous as an adult. Their jaws are finely serrated which aids them in tearing vegetation.Habitat: Mainly stay near the coastline and around islands and live in bays and protected shores, especially in areas with seagrass beds. Rarely observed in the open ocean.Nesting: Green turtles nest at intervals of 2, 3, or more years, with wide year-to-year fluctuations in numbers of nesting females. Nests between 3 to 5 times per season. Lays an average of 115 eggs in each nest, with the eggs incubating for about 60 days. Range: Found in all temperate and tropical waters throughout the world.Status:U.S. - Listed as Endangered. Threats to Survival: The greatest threat is from the commercial harvest for eggs and food. Other green turtle parts are used for leather and small turtles are sometimes stuffed for curios. Incidental catch in commercial shrimp trawling is an increasing source of mortality.Population Estimate*: About 88,520 nesting females.


How large the green sea turtle really is

How Large the Green Sea Turtle Really Is!

  • This is Shane the Green Sea Turtle.


The hawksbill sea turtle

The Hawksbill Sea Turtle

  • Size: Adults are 2.5 to 3 feet in length (76-91 cm).Weight: Adults can weigh between 100 to 150 pounds (40-60 kg).Diet: The hawksbill's narrow head and jaws shaped like a beak allow it to get food from crevices in coral reefs. They eat sponges, anemones, squid and shrimp.Habitat: Typically found around coastal reefs, rocky areas, estuaries and lagoons.Nesting: Nest at intervals of 2, 3, or more years. Nests between 2 to 4 times per season. Lays an average 160 eggs in each nest. Eggs incubate for about 60 days.Range: Most tropical of all sea turtles. Tropical and subtropical waters of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans.Status: U.S. - Listed as Endangered.Threats to Survival: The greatest threat to hawksbill sea turtle is the harvesting for their prized shell, often referred to as "tortoise shell." In some countries the shell is still used to make hair ornaments, jewelry, and other decorative items.Population Estimate*: 22,900 nesting females.


The kemp s ridley sea turtle

The Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle

  • Size: Adults measure around 2 feet (65 cm) in average length.Weight: Adults weigh between 77 and 100 pounds (35-45 kg).Diet: Have powerful jaws that help them to crush and grind crabs, clams, mussels, and shrimp. They also like to eat fish, sea urchins, squid and jellyfish.Habitat: Prefer shallow areas with sandy and muddy bottoms.Nesting: Kemp's ridleys nest more often than other species, every 1 1/2 years on average. They also nest in mass synchronized nestings called arribadas (Spanish for "arrival"). Only the olive ridley also nests this way. Kemp's ridley nest 2 - 3 times each season. They lay an average of 110 eggs in each nest and the eggs incubate for about 55 days.Range: Adults are mostly limited to the Gulf of Mexico. Juveniles range between tropical and temperate coastal areas of the northwest Atlantic Ocean and can be found up and down the east coast of the United States.Status: U.S. - Listed as Endangered.Threats to Survival: The greatest threat to the Kemp's ridley is from human use activities including collection of eggs and killing adults and juveniles for meat and other products. The significant decline in the number of Kemp's ridley nests was a result of high levels of incidental take by shrimp trawlers.Population Estimate*: More than 2,500 nesting females.

The Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle is the smallest sea turtle. This is a picture of one.


The leatherback sea turtle

The Leatherback Sea Turtle

  • Size: 4 to 6 feet (121-183 cm). The largest leatherback ever recorded was almost 10 feet (305 cm) from the tip of its beak to the tip of its tail and weighed in at 2,019 pounds (916 kg). Weight: 550 to 1,545 pounds (250-700 kg).Diet: Leatherbacks have delicate, scissor-like jaws. Their jaws would be damaged by anything other than a diet of soft-bodied animals, so they feed almost exclusively on jellyfish. It is remarkable that this large, active animal can survive on a diet of jellyfish, which are composed mostly of water and appear to be a poor source of nutrients.Habitat: Primarily found in the open ocean, as far north as Alaska and as far south as the southern tip of Africa, though recent satellite tracking research indicates that leatherbacks feed in areas just offshore. Known to be active in water below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, the only reptile known to remain active at such a low temperature.Nesting: Nest at intervals of 2 to 3 years, though recent research has indicated they can nest every year. Nests between 6 to 9 times per season, with an average of 10 days between nestings. Lays an average of 80 fertilized eggs, the size of billiard balls, and 30 smaller, unfertilized eggs, in each nest. Eggs incubate for about 65 days. Unlike other species of sea turtles, leatherback females may change nesting beaches, though they tend to stay in the same region. Range: Most widely distributed of all sea turtles. Found world wide with the largest north and south range of all the sea turtle species. With its streamlined body shape and the powerful front flippers, a leatherback can swim thousands of miles over open ocean and against fast currents.Status: U.S. - Listed as Endangered..Threats to Survival: Greatest threat to leatherback sea turtles is from incidental take in commercial fisheries and marine pollution (such as balloons and plastic bags floating in the water, which are mistaken for jellyfish).Population Estimate*:About 35,860 nesting females.


1 big turtle

1BIG Turtle!

  • This is a Leatherback Sea Turtle.


The loggerhead sea turtle

The Loggerhead Sea Turtle

  • Size: Typically 2.5 to 3.5 feet in carapace length (73-107 cm).Weight: Adult weigh up to 350 pounds (159 kg).Diet: Primarily carnivorous and feed mostly on shellfish that live on the bottom of the ocean. They eat horseshoe crabs, clams, mussels, and other invertebrates. Their powerful jaw muscles help them to easily crush the shellfish.Habitat: Prefer to feed in coastal bays and estuaries, as well as in the shallow water along the continental shelves of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans.Nesting: Nest at intervals of 2, 3, or more years. They lay 4 to 7 nests per season, approximately 12 to 14 days apart. Lays average of between 100 to 126 eggs in each nest. Eggs incubate for about 60 days.Status:U.S. - Listed as Threatened .

    Threats to Survival: The greatest threat is loss of nesting habitat due to coastal development, predation of nests, and human disturbances (such as coastal lighting and housing developments) that cause disorientations during the emergence of hatchlings. Other major threats include incidental capture in longline fishing, shrimp trawling and pollution. Incidental capture in fisheries is thought to have played a significant role in the recent population declines observed for the loggerhead.Population Estimate*: About 44,560 nesting females.


The olive ridley sea turtle

The Olive Ridley Sea Turtle

  • Size: Adults measure 2 to 2.5 feet (62-70 cm) in carapace length.Weight: Adults weigh between 77 and 100 pounds (35-45 kg).Diet: Have powerful jaws that allow for an omnivore diet of crustaceans (such as shrimp & crabs), mollusks, tunicates, fish, crabs, and shrimp. Habitat: Generally found in coastal bays and estuaries, but can be very oceanic over some parts of its range. They typically forage off shore in surface waters or dive to depths of 500 feet (150 m) to feed on bottom dwelling crustaceans. Nesting: Nest every year in arribadas. Nests 2 times each season. An average clutch size is over 110 eggs which require a 52 to 58 day incubation period. Range: The olive ridley inhabits tropical and subtropical waters of the Pacific, Indian and Atlantic Oceans.Status: U.S. - Listed as Threatened Threats to Survival: Direct harvest of adults and eggs, incidental capture in commercial fisheries and loss of nesting habitat are the main threats to this species.Population Estimate*: About 800,000 nesting females.


Extras

!Extras!


The green sea turtle

The Green Sea Turtle

  • Type: Reptile

  • Diet: Herbivore

  • Average lifespan in the wild: Over 80 years

  • Size: Up to 5 ft (1.5 m)

  • Weight: Up to 700 lbs (317.5 kg)

  • Group name: Bale

  • Like other sea turtles, the green turtle cannot pull its head into its shell.

  • Protection status: endangered.

  • Size relative to a 6-ft (2-m) man:


The end

THE END


  • Login