African americans and minnesota schools
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African Americans and Minnesota Schools. African Americans make up 13 percent of the U.S. population. But in Minnesota, African Americans only make up 5 percent of the population. African Americans and Minnesota Schools. African Americans called Minnesota home as early as 1802 .

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African Americans and Minnesota Schools

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African americans and minnesota schools

African Americans and Minnesota Schools


African americans and minnesota schools1

African Americans make up 13 percent of the U.S. population.

But in Minnesota, African Americans only make up

5 percent of the population.

African Americans and Minnesota Schools


African americans and minnesota schools

African Americans called Minnesota home as early as 1802.

The well-known slave

Dred Scott was owned

by an officer at Fort Snelling.

African Americans and Minnesota Schools


African americans and minnesota schools2

Sadly, our state's educational system has failed these students:

Minnesota has the second-largest math achievement gap between whites and African Americans in the nation.

Less than half of Minnesota's African American students graduate high school.

African Americans and Minnesota Schools


African americans and minnesota schools3

While African Americans are under-represented in population and graduation, they are over-represented in key areas:

28 percent of all arrests are of

African Americans.

40 percent of the prison population are African Americans.

African Americans and Minnesota Schools


African american characteristics beliefs and attitudes

African American Characteristics, Beliefs and Attitudes

  • A study by the Black Youth Project shows that young black people (ages 15-25) believe strongly that they have a marginalized existence. The majority believe:

    • They live in neighborhoods with problems of gangs, drugs and violence and that they receive a poorer education compared to their white counterparts.

  • That it is hard to get ahead due to the discrimination they face.

  • That racism will NOT be eliminated in their lifetime.


African american characteristics beliefs and attitudes1

African American Characteristics, Beliefs and Attitudes

  • Young black people have strong value systems and believe that they can make a change

  • The majority believes that they can make a difference by participating in politics and have increased their involvement on a grass roots level.

  • 90% believe that sex education should be mandatory in school, that schools should provide condoms, but the majority do not believe in abortion.

  • The majority of black youth listen to rap music, but believe there are too many references to violence in the music.


African american characteristics beliefs and attitudes2

African American Characteristics, Beliefs and Attitudes

  • The African American young people have unique cultural characteristics that contribute to their resiliency, including:

  • Strong sense of spirituality

  • Strong sense of ethnic identity

  • Adaptive extended family structures

  • Mutual support


Instructional strategies

Instructional Strategies

  • Overall, the factors that will positively influence African Americans include good classroom climate, appropriate teaching strategies selected, and good motivational techniques are employed.


Instructional strategies ctnd

Instructional Strategies Ctnd

  • How a teacher introduces a new skill to the African American student is vital. Using the Socratic Method and visual cues are some of the ways that teachers can ensure that the African

  • American students in the classroom have an easier time comprehending the material.

  • Make sure students know why learning the specific skill is important to learn.


Instructional strategies ctnd1

Instructional Strategies Ctnd

  • Use clear and concise demonstrations when teaching a skill or procedure. Allow plenty of practice time. Always use clear, positive, constructive feedback.


Instructional strategies ctnd2

Instructional Strategies Ctnd

  • Ignore typical stereotypes of African Americans and treat every student the same. If a teacher accepts the media definition of African Americans, we would all believe that all African Americans are incapable of learning. Put the stereotypes aside.


Instructional strategies ctnd3

Instructional Strategies Ctnd

  • Get to know your students and their background. Then use the knowledge about your students to connect classroom teachings to real-world applications that will apply to them.


African american children s families

African American Children’s Families

  • Family characteristics that would be important for a teacher to know about when working with children of African American families include:

  • The majority of children are born into families where the mother is not married of the biological father, and grows up in a household headed by the mother.

  • Families tend to be more hierarchical and are more likely to be strict, to hold demanding behavioral standards, and to use physical discipline. Such strictness is, however, balanced within a context of strong support and affection.


African american children s families1

African American Children’s Families

  • The teacher should be aware of how the instruction the student is receiving affects the whole family.

  • African American families are generally collectivistic rather than the general norm of individualistic of general American culture.  

  • Grandmothers often step in to parent children. In 1998, 1.4 million African American children (12%) lived in their grandparent’s home.

  • Older siblings play a key role in African American households. Older children, especially female, are often pressed into helping their mother with the care of the household.


African american children s families2

African American Children’s Families

  • Recent immigration of black people brings different customs and faith based traditions.

  • If the family has recently immigrated, a translator may be needed.  

  • The teacher should also be respectful of the family's cultural beliefs.  For example, if the family celebrates Kwanzaa instead of Christmas, the teacher should be ready for the student to be absent and make sure they have all their work ready for them to take home.  


Differences in language

Differences in Language


Cultural awareness

Cultural Awareness


References

References

  • Barbarin, O. (in press). Characteristics of African American families.

  • Staples (1997). An overview of race and marital status. In McAdoo, H.P.(Ed.) Black families (3rd ed., pp. 269-273).


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