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Academy of Environmental Water Technology (AEWT) PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Heritage High School’s. Academy of Environmental Water Technology (AEWT). Somer Y. Sutton, Director and AEWT Lead Teacher. “Water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink.” from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

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Heritage high school s

Heritage High School’s

Academy of Environmental Water Technology (AEWT)

Somer Y. Sutton, Director and AEWT Lead Teacher


Academy of environmental water technology aewt

  • “Water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink.”

    • from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge


The importance of water technology water availability

The Importance of Water Technology: Water Availability

  • Earth is a water planet:

    • 71.4% of the earth is covered in water,

    • However, only around 3% of it is fresh (“drinkable”) water

  • 2/3 of that 3% of fresh water is locked up in permanent ice (glaciers, polar ice caps)

  • This leaves only 1% of Earth’s water to quench the needs of 7 billion (+) peoples (!)


Drinking water operator

Drinking Water Operator

  • Drinking water operators are responsible for providing people with safe, clean (and palatable) water.

  • Drinking water operators are certified by state agencies and are employed local, state and federal entities (Army Corp of Engineers, military and civilian), private businesses, etc.

  • Water operations offer either a lifelong career opportunity or can act as a stepping stone to a large variety of environmental careers.


The importance of water technology the workforce need

The Importance of Water Technology: The Workforce Need

  • Consider these conclusions from a recent Water Environment Research Foundation study:

    • It is projected that in the next ten years, 37 percent of water utility workers and 31 percent of wastewater utility workers will retire

    • These are the people who manage and protect our precious supply of fresh water.


Aewt addresses this workforce need

AEWT Addresses this Workforce Need

“Preparing the Next Generation of

Environmental & Water Stewards”

  • AEWT focuses on an Environmental Water Technology course of study, leading to a student industry certification

  • Students can graduate high school with a Level C Water Operator Pre-licensure courses


Aewt course of study

AEWT Course of Study

  • Required Academy Course:

    • Beginning Water Technology (10th grade)

    • Intermediate Water Technology (11th grade)

    • Advanced Water Technology (12th grade)

    • Science Research (any year)

  • Electives:

    • Marine Science/AICE Marine Science

    • AICE Environmental Management

  • Senior year: Level C Water Operator State Test


Academy of environmental water technology aewt

  • The U.S. Department of Labor estimated that operators of water- and wastewater-treatment plants earned an average salary of $41,580 in 2009. (http://www.collegeboard.com/csearch/majors_careers/profiles/careers/104723.html)


Career directions

Career Directions


Average salaries for environmental jobs

Average Salaries for Environmental Jobs

  • Senior Environmental Scientist Analyst

  • $84,000

  • Scientist Clinical Lab

  • $55,000

  • Coastal Resources Scientist

  • $71,000

  • Interdiscplinary Scientist G

  • $61,000

  • Environmental Scientist

  • $56,000

  • NEPA Planner

  • $67,000

  • Senior Environmental Scientist

  • $66,000

  • Environmental Engineer Investigation Closure

  • $72,000

  • City Research Scientist

  • $65,000

  • Geologist Environmental Scientist

  • $52,000

  • Physical Scientist G

  • $83,000

  • Soil Scientist

  • $70,000

  • Research Scientist Supervisor

  • $83,000

  • (http://www.indeed.com/salary/Environmental-Scientist.html)


Aewt features

AEWT Features

  • Paid student internship

  • Industry Mentors

  • Industry Guest Speakers

  • Industry Sponsorships

  • Summer employment/research

  • Partnership with Florida Gateway College

  • Employ Florida Water Banner Center affiliation

  • Engaged Advisory Committee

  • 3-4 year sequential CTE program

  • Voluntary open enrollment

  • Integrated academic & technical curriculum

  • Real world, hands-on field experience and research projects

  • Water and/or wastewater Level C pre-licensure courses

  • Postsecondary Dual Enrollment Credit


Aewt advisory committee

AEWT Advisory Committee

  • Brevard Public Schools

  • Florida Department of Environmental Protection

  • St. Johns River Water Management District

  • Employ Florida Water Banner Center for Water Resources

  • City of Palm Bay Utilities & HR Departments

  • City of Cocoa Utilities Department

  • City of Melbourne Utilities Department

  • Florida Gateway College

  • Florida Institute of Technology: Civil Engineering

  • Indian River Lagoon National Estuary Program

  • Florida Rural Water Association

  • Florida Section AWWA

  • Ecospatial Analysts, Inc

  • 321 Plumbing, Inc.


What kinds of activities do aewt students do

What kinds of activities do AEWT students do?

School-wide recycling initiative


Academy of environmental water technology aewt

Barrier Island Sancturay


Academy of environmental water technology aewt

Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge


Academy of environmental water technology aewt

Mote Marine Laboratory


Unique hands on experiences in the classroom

Unique Hands-On Experiences in the Classroom

  • Laptop computer lab in the classroom

  • State-of-the-art laboratory in the classroom

  • Industry-specific equipment

  • Classroom river and aquifer models

  • Soil, air and water quality field kits

  • Solar panel construction

  • Fresh/saltwater mini ecosystems

  • Coming soon:

    • School garden

    • Aquaponic growing systems

    • Mini-river ecosystem working model


Unique hands on experiences in the classroom1

Unique Hands-On Experiences in the Classroom

Cross-connection/

backflow

model


Science fair

Science Fair

  • Solar-powered, portable, UV disinfection device for water (funded by a $500 J.B. Butler Science Grant)

  • “Geobot” used to identify types of minerals in soil

  • Solar powered model vehicle

  • A profile of native and non-native species in the local watershed

  • Environmentally-friendly pest control in agriculture

  • Using greywater in hydroponics

  • Environmentally-friendly mosquito control


Additional activities

Additional Activities

  • Environmental Sustainability Club

  • EnviroThon competition

  • Energy Whiz competition

  • Beach clean-ups

  • Organic farming

  • Stormwater Sedimentation and Erosion Control Class


What are the benefits of an academy

What are the benefits of an academy?

  • This promotes a family-like atmosphere and results in close student-teacher ties.

    • A career academy includes the following essential elements:

      • A small learning community

      • A college-prep curriculum with a career theme

      • Partnerships with employers, the community, and higher education

  • By design, these three central elements of a career academy lead to a curriculum that is rigorous, relevant, and relational.

  • (http://www.fldoe.org/workforce/careeracademies/ca_home.asp)


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