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CoSA
Social Integration

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1. Social Integration Circles of Support and Accountability CoSA

2. CoSA ? Volunteer Support Circles Core Member Volunteer

3. Lloyd

4. ? . . .it is generally accepted that social relations and their quality . . . have a stabilizing effect, especially after release.? - Estroff, Zimmer,Lachicotte, & Benoit, 1994. The influence of social networks and social support on violence - see also Albrecht, 1979

5. Close supporting relationships were found to decrease the risk of relapse in child molesters and in rapists. - Grubin, D. (1997). Predictors of risk in serious sex offenders. British Journal of Psychiatry, 170(Suppl.), 17-21. - see also Berner & Bolterauer,1995;

6. Francis Cullen (past president of the American Society of Criminology and of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences.) Proposes Social Support as an organizing concept of contemporary Criminology. - Francis Cullen (1994) Presidential Address to the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. Justice Quarterly, Vol. 11 No. 4 December 1994.

7. Local community is capable of disapproving criminal behaviour Disapproval is best received from people who care. CoSA creates communities of care.

8. Bobby

9. Sex offenders with domestic stability (stable housing and social support) are less likely to commit new sex offenses compared to those offenders who lack such stability. - Lane Council of Governments (2003). Managing Sex Offenders in the Community: A National Overview, Eugene, Oregon.

10. CoSA addresses twin ?DIMENSIONS? of Social Support: Instrumental Dimension - needs associated with locating housing, employment, income support, treatment; Expressive Dimension - need for acceptance, belonging, affirmation of worth, companionship - Cullen (1994)

11. ? . . .in recognition that the state, even at local government level, can only ever provide part of the solution to the issues that matter most to people ? and that, with the right support and motivation, local people and community groups will readily play an active role in partnership with the state? What works in community involvement in area- based initiatives? A systematic review of the literature. P. Burton et al. British Home Office Online Report 53/04. p. 25 (accessed November 2006).

12. Communities bear a responsibility for their own safety.

13. Policy and Practice Care should be taken not to confound control with social support. They are not necessarily rival concepts. They can be mutually reinforcing in reducing crime. - Cullen (1994) e.g. CoSA as an extra set of ?eyes and ears?

14. Cecil

15. Social Support is a precondition for effective social control - Francis Cullen (1994) Presidential Address to the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. Justice Quarterly, Vol. 11 No. 4 December 1994.

16. Violent sexual reoffence is related to the extent and quality of positive prossocial support, particularly by male associates. - Violent Sex Offenders Lack Male Social Support. Guti?rrez-Lobos , et al (2001). International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 45(1), 70-82

17. Volunteer Commitment First week ? Second Week - daily, face-to-face - 20 ? 30 hours Subsequent Weeks - daily, face-to-face - 14 ? 20 hours Subsequent Months - telephone, and face-to-face - meetings every two weeks Crisis situations - intensity increase

18. SONAR Sex Offender Needs Assessment Rating Part of the so-called ?3rd Generation? of risk assessment examining areas of NEED. ?Social Influences? form part of the assessment

19. SONAR ?Name all the people in the offender's life who are not paid to be with him. For each one, is the influence positive, negative or neutral? ? Score 0 - positive social balance of 2+ 1 - balance of 0 or +1 2 - balance less than zero

20. ?4th Generation? of Risk Evaluation Making What Works, Work by ? . . .not only assessing offender risk and needs but also factors that are important in case management (e.g., the assessment of strengths). In addition, fourth generation instruments provide structured intervention plans for supervising offenders that arise from the assessment.? - Andrews, D. A., Bonta, J. & Wormith, J. S. (2006).? The recent past and near future of risk and/or need assessment, Crime and Delinquency, 52, 7-27.

21. Integrating Social Support with Best Practice Considerable progress has been made toward integrating notions of social support within the sociology of mental illness, but not in the field of criminology. Francis Cullen (1994) Presidential Address to the Academy of Criminal Justice ?Social Support As An Organizing Concept for Criminology?

22. Timely Information Exchanges 1. Pacific Region (CSC) CoSA Protocol - Engages community support early - Enhances risk appraisal - begins relationship-building 2. Eyes and Ears

23. National Replication _______________________________________________________________________________________ Circles (60) Control (60) _______________________________________________________________________________________ M(SD) age 43.18 (9.55) 43.52 (8.66) M(SD) STATIC-99 5.00 (2.14) 6.11 (1.52) M(SD) RRASOR* 2.72 (1.50) 2.74 (1.36) M(range?mos) follow-up 32.53 (6-84) 35.74 (6-95) M(mos) until 1st failure 23.92 50.73 Recidivism Sexual 2.13% (1) 12.77% (6) Expected sexual 28.50% (17)** 26.45% (16) Violent* 8.51% (4) 31.91% (15) General ? 10.64% (5) 38.30% (18) Dispositions 17 75 _______________________________________________________________________________________ * p < .05 ** p < .01 ? p < .10

24. Social support leads to more effective policing Social support reduces victimization

25. Calgary

26. Social support reduces the pain of criminal victimization

27. D:\VIDEO_TS\VIDEO_TS.IFO


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