S. 3307 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act  of 2010

S. 3307 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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No direct impact; first year demonstration project phase-in to occur during the 2012-13 school year. Directly certifying children for free school meals using household income data from Medicaid to supplement SNAP data. Requires LEAs selected to participate in the project to certify directly for fr

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S. 3307 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010

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1. S. 3307 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 Preliminary Review Major Provisions of the New Federal Law December 8, 2010 (Note: As more information and clarification becomes available PASBO will update this preliminary document.) 12/14/2010 1 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

2. No direct impact; first year demonstration project phase-in to occur during the 2012-13 school year. Directly certifying children for free school meals using household income data from Medicaid to supplement SNAP data. Requires LEAs selected to participate in the project to certify directly for free school meals for all children who are receiving Medicaid benefits and whose household income does not exceed 133% of the federal poverty line (same as current eligibility requirement). Phases-in during the three school years beginning in 2012. Requires that by the 2014 school year and each subsequent school year, selected LEAs collectively serve 10% of the students certified for free and reduced price meals nationwide. According to CBO, 115,000 additional students will be certified by 2015. State interest will determine early adopters. Demonstration Project—Direct Certification (Sec. 103) 12/14/2010 2 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

3. Alternatives to Direct Certification (Sec. 104) Multiplication factor has most immediate impact. Meal program claims based on percentage of enrolled students directly certified multiplied by a factor of 1.6. Allows certain schools (80% F/R) and LEAs to receive reimbursements for free or reduced price meals pursuant to a formula that is based on their direct certification rates. Limits participation to schools and LEAs that directly certify at least 40% of their students, but allows the Secretary after July 1, 2014, to set a lower minimum threshold for participation. 12/14/2010 3 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

4. Alternatives to Direct Certification (Sec. 104) Requires the Secretary of Agriculture to: (1) identify alternatives to the daily counting of meals served by category and the use of annual applications as the basis of reimbursements for free or reduced-price school meals; (2) consider, in identifying such alternatives, recommendations of the Committee on National Statistics of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) regarding the use of census data or other data sources; and (3) consider the use of periodic socioeconomic surveys of households of children attending school in SFA areas 12/14/2010 4 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

5. Alternatives to Direct Certification (Sec. 104) Requires schools and school food authorities reimbursed on the basis of either new certification process to provide free meals to all their students under the school lunch and breakfast programs and cover, from nonfederal sources, the costs of serving such meals that exceed the assistance received under such programs. Limited state participation until 2014, then all states eligible. Estimated participation = 300 schools 12/14/2010 5 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

6. School Breakfast Program (Sec. 105) No immediate impact; contingent on appropriation. Requires the Secretary of Agriculture to award competitive grants to states and subgrants to LEAs for the creation, maintenance, or expansion of school breakfast programs at schools where at least 40% of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price school lunches under the school lunch program. 12/14/2010 6 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

7. School Breakfast Program (Sec. 105) Gives priority to LEAs that adopt such mechanisms or have schools in which at least 75% of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price school lunches. Directs subgrantees, at least 180 days before the end of a grant term, to evaluate whether it would be cost-effective for such schools to provide universal free breakfasts under the school breakfast program. 12/14/2010 7 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

8. Summer Food Service Program (Sec. 112) Requires states to ensure that SFAs cooperate with participating service institutions to inform families of the availability and location of summer food service program meal sites and the availability of the school breakfast program. 12/14/2010 8 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

9. Child and Adult Care Food Program At Risk After School Snack Program (Sec. 122) No impact; PA currently eligible. 2009 = 33 million snacks/19 million meals under CACFP Makes all states eligible for after school meal reimbursement. About $737 million in new funding over ten years for program expansion. 12/14/2010 9 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

10. Childhood Hunger Prevention (Sec. 142) No immediate impact; contingent upon appropriation. Authorizes the Secretary to award grants to, or enter into agreements with, governors to carry out demonstration projects testing comprehensive and innovative strategies to end childhood hunger, including alternative models for service delivery and benefit levels that promote the reduction or elimination of childhood hunger by 2015. Will fund “innovative projects during hours when children are out of school, including weekends and holidays.” 12/14/2010 10 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

11. School Lunch Payments (Sec.143) No immediate impact; USDA guidance anticipated. Requires the Secretary to examine the current policies and practices of states and LEAs regarding: (1) extending credit to children to cover their costs for reimbursable school lunches and breakfasts; and (2) providing nonreimbursable meals to children who are without funds. Requires the Secretary, based on such review, to: (1) report on the feasibility of establishing national standards for meal charges and the provision of alternate meals; and (2) make recommendations for implementing those standards. 12/14/2010 11 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

12. Nutrition Standards and NSLP Reimbursement (Sec. 201) No immediate impact; final regulations not anticipated until January 2012, making new standards effective for the 2012-13 school year. Directs the Secretary to promulgate regulations to update the meal patterns and nutrition standards for the school lunch and school breakfast programs based on recommendations made by the National Academy of the Sciences’ Institute of Medicine (IOM). Upon adoption of standards, increases the reimbursement for lunches served under the school lunch program by SFAs that are in compliance with such interim or final regulations by $.06 as certified by states. ($100 million over two years to states for certification expenses.) 12/14/2010 12 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

13. Nutrition Standards and NSLP Reimbursement (Sec. 201) Standards will increase portions of fruits and vegetables, whole grains and low-fat or non-fat dairy products. IOM indicates an increase in cost to schools of 4-9% . (The $.06 increase is a 2.33% increase to the current $2.68 lunch reimbursement.) CBO says reimbursements will increase revenue by $300 million beginning in 2013 but costs will go up between $200-$400 million to comply with the standards.) 12/14/2010 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials 13

14. Nutrition Standards (Sec. 208) No immediate impact; USDA proposed regulations anticipated within 18 months from HH-FK effective date. Amends the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 to require the Secretary to establish science-based nutrition standards consistent with the most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans for foods served in schools outside the school lunch or breakfast programs. Standards apply to the entire school campus until the end of the school day. 12/14/2010 14 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

15. Milk and Water Milk provision coincides with nutrition standards for meal patterns (school year 2012-13); USDA guidance pending. Requires meals served under the school lunch program to offer students a variety of fluid milk that is consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (Sec. 202) Requires schools participating in the school lunch program to offer free, potable water for consumption in the place where meals are served during meal service (Sec. 203) 12/14/2010 15 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

16. Wellness Policies(Sec.204) Requires LEAs participating in the school lunch or breakfast programs to establish new local school wellness policies for their schools. Directs the Secretary to promulgate regulations that require such LEAs to include: (1) goals for nutrition promotion and education, physical activity, and other school-based activities that promote student wellness; (2) nutrition guidelines for all foods available on school campuses during the school day; 12/14/2010 16 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

17. Wellness Policies (Sec.204) (3) the local community in the development, implementation, and periodic review of such policies; (4) public notification regarding the content and implementation of such policies; and (5) periodic assessments of and reporting on policy implementation. 12/14/2010 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials 17

18. Wellness Policies(Sec.204) Requires the Secretary to provide information and technical assistance to LEAs, school food authorities, and states for use in establishing healthy school environments. Directs the Secretary, subject to the availability of appropriations, to report by January 1, 2014, on the implementation, strength, and effectiveness of the local school wellness policies. Repeals local wellness policy requirements under the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004. 12/14/2010 18 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

19. School Lunch Prices (Sec. 205) No immediate impact; USDA regulations anticipated. Requires the average paid lunch price that is less than the difference between the free lunch reimbursement rate and the paid lunch reimbursement rate to be adjusted so that the total per meal revenue received for those lunches is equal to the per meal revenue provided by the federal government for free lunches. Sets forth the formula for setting the average price for paid meals. 12/14/2010 19 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

20. School Lunch Prices (Sec. 205) Requires school food authorities that have an average paid lunch price equal to or greater than the difference between the free lunch reimbursement rate and the paid lunch reimbursement rate to adjust their prices annually by the inflation adjustment factor used for federal reimbursement rates. Allows a school food authority to reduce the average paid lunch price if the state ensures that nonfederal funding is added to the nonprofit school food service account of the food authority to satisfy the requirements of this section. 12/14/2010 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials 20

21. Sale of Other Food in Schools (Sec. 206) Immediate impact; effective July 1, 2011 Requires all revenue from the sale in school of foods that are not reimbursable under the school lunch or breakfast programs to accrue to the nonprofit school food service account of a participating school food authority. Prohibits the costs of obtaining nonprogram foods from outstripping the revenue from selling such foods. 12/14/2010 21 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

22. Commodity Support (Sec. 401) Immediate impact. Current law requires FNS to use 12% of NSLP “cash” for commodities. New law allows “bonus” commodities to count towards the 12% requirement. 12/14/2010 22 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

23. Education, Training and Certification (Sec. 306) No immediate impact. Appropriates $5 million for FY 2011 for required education, training and certification for management of SFAs and standards for selection of state agency directors. 12/14/2010 23 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

24. Farm-to-School Programs (Sec. 243) Appropriates $5 million starting in FY 2013 for Farm-to-School Programs to provide local produce and build school gardens. 12/14/2010 24 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

25. Cost Allocation (Sec. 307) Appropriates $2 million in FY 2011 for a study on the allocation of costs other than food or labor charged to SFAs. Guidance and regs to follow study. 12/14/2010 25 Preliminary Summary prepared by the PA Association of School Business Officials

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