Three-Dimensional Effects Using Yarns Containing Spandex
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Three-Dimensional Effects Using Yarns Containing Spandex. ElSyaed ElNashar, Tamer Hamouda, and Abdel-Fattah M. Seyam College of Textiles, North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC, USA. Background. Weaving Machine. Weave Structures.

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Three-Dimensional Effects Using Yarns Containing Spandex

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Three dimensional effects using yarns containing spandex

Three-Dimensional Effects Using Yarns Containing Spandex

ElSyaed ElNashar, Tamer Hamouda, and Abdel-Fattah M. Seyam

College of Textiles, North Carolina State University

Raleigh, NC, USA

Background

Weaving Machine

Weave Structures

Spandex production accounts for 0.9% of the world natural and manufactured fiber production. It is used in sweaters, tops, trousers, formal suits, jackets, sleeveless dresses, vests and knickers, shaped garments, hosiery, swimwear, sportswear, and bodies. While the increase in Spandex production and markets is significant, little scientific research has been published. This research goal is to explore the potential of using filling yarns containing Spandex to produce 3-D effects. The 3D effects are developed through woven fabric design with varying tightness. Variation in tightness cause differential shrinkage upon removing the fabric from the loom and/or washing while in relaxed state. Loose weave structure causes more shrinkage as compared to tight weaves. The differential shrinkage causes parts of the design to be raised in the direction perpendicular to the fabric plane.

Weaves used:

Plain Weave

2X2 Twill (Double Cloth)

8-H Sateen (Double Cloth)

7-H Sateen (Double Cloth

Plain Weave (Double Cloth)

12-H Sateen (Double Cloth)

14-H sateen (Double Cloth)

Methodology

Construction

Results and Discussions

*40 Denier Lycra® Spandex of Invista was used as core

Arrangement of weft yarns was altered to provide different 3D effects.

Conclusion

Using yarns containing Spandex combined with variation in fabric tightness through utilizing different weaves led to producing 3D fancy effects upon relaxation of fabrics (washing under low or no tension) without the need for heat, chemical treatment, or mechanical devices such as those used to produce crinkle effects.

Acknowledgement

This work is funded by Lubrizol Advanced Materials, Inc., State of North Carolina, and Egyptian Government. We appreciate Unifi, Inc., Madison, NC, USA for the formation of single covered yarns.


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