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Coaching Employees PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Coaching Employees. Training. Performance Review. Listening. Handling Problem Employees. Motivating Good Employees. Hiring the best Employees at the Start. Select Two Volunteers for Future In-class Performance Review. Listening is good business. From a University Study.

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Coaching Employees

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Coaching Employees

Training

Performance Review

Listening

Handling Problem Employees

Motivating Good Employees

Hiring the best Employees at the Start

Select Two Volunteers for Future In-class Performance Review


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Listening is good business


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From a University Study


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From Business Study


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  • Ten Bad Habits of Listening

  • Calling the Subject Uninteresting

  • Criticizing the Delivery

  • Getting Over Stimulated

  • Listening Only for Facts

  • Outlining Everything

  • Faking Attention

  • Tolerating or Creating Distractions

  • Evading the Difficult

  • Submitting to Emotional Words

  • Wasting Thought Power (Mental Tangents)

  • Mental Manipulations

  • Anticipate Speaker's Next Point

  • Identify Elements

  • Make Mental Summaries


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Grapevine Guidelines

.You Cannot Hide From the Grapevine. The Grapevine Usually Knows the Truth Although Not All of It.

.In the Absence of Clear and Credible Positive Information, the Grapevine Tends to Interpret Events in a Negative Fashion.

.Although Prone to Distortion, Grapevine Information Often is More Credible because it is "Off The Record".

.Congruence Between Official Information and the Grapevine Becomes an Index of Trust in an Individual or an Organization.

.Grapevine Gossip Tends to Travel From Centers of Power Within the Organization to the Less Powerful or Laterally Among Levels Within the Organization.

.Severe Social Sanctions and Distrust Are Directed Toward Individuals Who Consistently Pass Negative Information About Others Up a Grapevine Network.

.There are Many Grapevine Networks in any Organization. Each Network is a Community of Individuals Bound by Shared Experiences or Concerns.

.In Any Particular Grapevine Network, Relatively Few Individuals Communicate Most of the Information.

.Your reputation is Produced by the Grapevine. Grapevine Information Creates a Mind Set in Those Who Deal with You That is Quite Difficult to Change Once Established.

.The Grapevine Consistently Confronts the Individual with Real-Time Moral and Ethical Dilemmas That Help Clarify Personal Values and Decision Processes.


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Coaching Employees

Training

Performance Review

Listening

Handling Problem Employees

Motivating Good Employees

Hiring the best Employees at the Start


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HOW TO DEVELOP YOUR PEOPLE TO

EFFECTIVE PERFORMANCE

·        Provide them with meaningful, challenging jobs

·        Give them sufficient orientation

·        Let them know how they are doing

·        Coach them when necessary

·        Delegate wherever possible

·        Set a good example as a manager

·        Show a genuine interest in your people

·        Encourage their self-development

·        Reward them according to their performance


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THE SUPERVISOR’S QUICK AND EASY WAY

TO TRAIN EFFECTIVELY

·        Explain importance of the job

·        If possible - show employee how to do the job first

·        Repeat the job - slowly - step by step - Use sense of hear, see and touch

·        Ask employee if he/she has any questions

·        Have employee do the job or explain it back to you

·        Correct any mistakes - be understanding and tactful

·       Check back occasionally - let employee know how she/he is doing


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Coaching Employees

Training

Performance Review

Listening

Handling Problem Employees

Motivating Good Employees

Hiring the best Employees at the Start


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Progress Review and Interview

To monitor progress toward the achievement of objectives and to provide and opportunity for coaching

Performance Review and Interview

To mutually agree to the overall degree of achievement o objectives and to establish a plan for improvement

Salary Review and Interview

To reward the employee for achievement and contribution

Career Discussion

To assess employee capability, to assist the employee to identify his/her next job goal, and to establish a personal development plan for future job goal achievement

Types of Reviews


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I) Purpose of Performance Review

A) To evaluate performance and assist the employee (and the supervisor) to improve performance.

B) Have mutually agreed to a plan of action

·        Evaluation of Achievement

·        Identifying Problems

·        Providing Recognition

·        Employee Development Planning

Measuring Results

Level 1No Activity toward objective achieved

Level 2The objective was partially met

Level 3 The objective was achieved as planned

Level 4 The objective was exceeded


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Steps in the Performance Interview

·        Agreeing on Performance Level

1.      Indirect Approach: supervisor requests the subordinate to first present his/her own evaluation.

2.      Direct Approach: supervisor presents the evaluation

·        Analyzing Performance

1.      Employee may not know what to accomplish

2.      Employee may not know how to accomplish

3.      Employee may not be able to accomplish

4.      Employee may not want to accomplish

·        Developing Alternative Improvement Plans

·        Agreeing on plan for improvement


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II) Purpose of Salary Review

The key to successful use of money as a reward is to tie it into the achievement of objectives, and the contribution the person makes to the organization.

The reward process must be truly individualized.

The purpose of the salary review is to collect the data necessary to implement the reward system.


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Achievement of Objectives

This information is available from previous progress and performance reviews.

Quality and Difficulty of Objectives

This is a subjective decision the manager must make after comparing the employee with others in the same pay grade level

Process of Achieving Objectives

The manager considers the manner in which the employee achieved objectives. Were employee's actions within policy, guidelines, and business ethics?

Salary Guidelines

Most companies provide salary guidelines. The company's economic condition and inflationary trends are usually built into the guidelines.

Other Factors

Factors such as the employee's past growth, future potential, and growth needs of the organization are also considered.

Factors in Salary Review


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Example of a Performance Review Form

Step 1: Employee fills out Major Job Functions and Actual Results

Step 2: Supervisor Evaluates and comments


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Step 3: Supervisor give overall Summary (section 1) and Behavior (section 2) to Employee

Step 4: Face to Face Review

Step 5: Employees Written Comments


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Step 7: Employee states Career Objectives

Step 8: Supervisor Completes form


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Coaching Employees

Training

Performance Review

Listening

Handling Problem Employees

Motivating Good Employees

Hiring the best Employees at the Start


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  • GUIDELINES FOR COPING WITH A

  • PROBLEM EMPLOYEE

  • PREVENTATIVE APPROACH

  • Select and Hire People Very Carefully

  • Can They Do the Job (Education, Skills, Experience)

  • Will They Do the Job (Motivation, Attitudes)

  •  B. Give Them Adequate Orientation and Job Training

  • II. CORRECTIVE APPROACH - Discussing Problem

  • A. Be Certain the Problem is Worth Correcting

  • B. Initiate the Discussion ASAP Don't Wait Too Long.

  • C. Conduct the Session in Private

  • D. State Your Specific Complaint

  • 1. Concentrate on Specific Job Results and Performance - Not Personality

  • 2. Criticize the ACT - Not the Person

  • 3. Mention only Things Over Which the Person has Some Control, Avoid Stuttering, Looks, Race, Age, Etc.

  • E. Ask Him/Her for Comments. Listen

  • F. Get the Individual to Recognize the Problem (Refer Again to Specific Evidence, Facts, or Proof if Necessary) 


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G. Get Agreement to Do Something About It

H. Ask What Action He/She Feels is Necessary to Correct Performance

I. If Necessary, Have Suggestions For Consideration

1. Try to be Helpful - Not Just Critical

2. Ask What He/She Thinks of Your Ideas

J. Get Mutual Agreement on Some Specific Action Both of You Will Take, and By When

K. Impose Mandatory Action Only If Really Necessary

L. Express Your Confidence That He/She can Correct the Situation

M. Make a Brief Record of Your Discussion

N. Later - Note and Comment Upon Any Improved Results or Behavior You Observe

III. PUNITIVE APPROACH - Obtaining Compliance With Rules of Conduct or Performance and Invoking Corrective Action If Necessary

A. Corrective Discipline - Art of Chewing Out a Subordinate

B. Transfer/Terminate


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In Class Performance Interview


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THE UNSATISFACTORY PERFORMER:

Salvage or Discharge?

  • Who should be fired - Things to consider

  • Length of service

  • Performance Record

  • Skills Involved and the Labor Market

  • Absenteeism Record

  • Attitudes and Personality

  • Legal Job Security Devices

  • Level in the Organization

  • Line Supervision - Did Manager Contribute

  • Investment

  • Personal Consequences

  • Effect on Other Employees


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  • Background - Things needed from the start

  • Clear understanding of responsibilities by both parties

  • Written Job description

  • Statement of goals

  • Regularly scheduled performance reviews

  • Appraisals discussed frankly - notes kept

  • Before Discharging Manager should

  • Check with others first to confirm performance

  • Check to see if better suited elsewhere in company

  • Query outside contacts about openings

  • Be in relaxed frame of mind

  • Not hope to be considered right by everyone


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  • When discharging the manager should

  • Do it promptly after decision is made

  • Carry out interview in clear language

  • Have facts at fingertips

  • Give opportunity for employee to make explanations and ask questions but no arguing about decision

  • Always maintain "hands-off"

  • Make a record

  • When reduction in force the manager might

  • Indicate if company has any relocation provisions

  • Consider access to office and services for new job search

  • Offer to go over this all in a day or two

  • Be aware of the impacts

  • On employee and family

  • On Boss Him or Herself

  • Other employees


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  • GETTING FIRED

  • Stages of Response·       Disbelief·       Anger

  • ·       Bargaining·       Depression

  • ·       Acceptance and Hope·        Positive Activity

  • Some Facts

  •     An estimated 9 out of 10 terminated executives are released by employers for reasons other than lack of job competence

  • ·       About 70% of fired executives have had a change in bosses in the previous 18 months

  • ·       According to a top outplacement consultant, it takes, on average, one week of job search per each $2000 of annual salary, (another says 1 month for every $10,000)

  • ·       Some 60% of terminated executives who receive outplacement guidance get new jobs within 20 weeks

  • ·       Some 2% of terminated executives and managers end up starting their own business

  • ·       Some 85% of terminated executives earn higher salaries on the new job they land

  • ·       Salaries on new jobs are 20-30% higher for approximately 90% who obtian new jobs at higher salaries

  • ·       An estimated 75% of the 1500 largest US corporations have outplacement services

  • Source: Iron Age, Jan 21, 1980


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Coaching Employees

Training

Performance Review

Listening

Handling Problem Employees

Motivating Good Employees

Hiring the best Employees at the Start


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  • Team Interaction Styles

  • (different ways that individuals relate to others at work)

  • First, is an individual more task-oriented or people-oriented?

  • Second, is an individual more of a thinker or a doer?

  • Every individual strikes own balance between these choices

  • This gives every team member a distinctive profile.


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If this is a member's profile

Then this is the member's style

Potential Strengths

Potential Weaknesses

A take-charge person, exerts strong influence to get things done, focuses on results.

DRIVER

determined, requiring, thorough, decisive, efficient, direct

dominating, unsympathetic, demanding, critical, impatient

A social specialist, expresses opinions and emotions easily; prefers strong interaction with people

ENTHUSIAST

personable, stimulating, enthusiastic, innovative

opinionated, undependable, reactionary

Likes to be well organized and thought out; prefers specific project and activities; enjoys putting structure to ideas

ANALYZER

industrious, persistent, serious, orderly, methodical

indecisive, uncommunicative, critical

Adaptive specialist, high concern for good relationships, seeks stability and predictability, wants to be part of larger picture

AFFILIATOR

cooperative, supportive, dependable, helpful

conforming, uncommitted, hides true feelings

Team Interaction Styles


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Team Member Motivations

People are motivated differently.

intrinsic rewards,

(gaining satisfaction from enjoyment of the task)

extrinsic rewards,

(in the form of money or grades, to perform)

Conflicts may arise when people with different goals and motivations work together on a project.


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Survey of 5000

Events


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If this is the member's profile...

Then the member is at this level of motivation...

And this is how they relate to the team.

An individual who never volunteers, who fails to meet expectations and only responds to threats.

Coercion: motivation through fear or force.

An individual at this level has little or no motivation to perform well. He/she will not seek responsibility and will try not to accept responsibility. The only way to make sure they meet expectations is to be clear about what they are expected to do and be sure to check that they are doing their work. Make the consequences of not performing clear.

An individual who focuses solely on his or her own payoffs or long term goals.

Compensation: motivation by rewards.

At this level, people perform a task because they will be rewarded for it. They complete the task not out of enjoyment of the task or responsibility to the team but because it can satisfy their personal goals.

An individual who expresses enjoyment in doing his/her work, who volunteers to to act as a specialist on a certain area of the project.

Cooperation: performing tasks out of personal interest rather than for external rewards.

Team members will volunteer to take on responsibility.

An individual who orients to the team as a unit and will do extra work to help maintain and coordinate the team.

Identification: desire to be associated with a particular group or project.

Individuals who identify with a team find it rewarding just to be associated with the team. This extra motivation can be channeled into team building and coordination work.

Individuals take personal responsibility for the project--they care about how well the work is done and will put in extra hours to make sure the work is finished successfully.

Ownership: the highest level.

People will perform their best out of a desire to improve themselves and the project. They take charge of the project, feeling personally responsible for its success or failure. They are self-directing and self-organizing. They help to push the team in a common direction.


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Needs Theory

Move

Employees

Up

Once a need is met, it no longer can serve as a motivator


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Coaching Employees

Training

Performance Review

Listening

Handling Problem Employees

Motivating Good Employees

Hiring the best Employees at the Start


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An Employment Interview

THE

OFFER

THE

APPRAISAL

THE

INTERVIEW

THE

VISIT


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THE VISIT

  • Gathering Preliminary Data

  • Manager sets itinerary for visit and determines what specific areas covered by each staff member

  • Arranges seminar for presentation of thesis or senior project etc.

  • Manager either serves as “guide” or selects a guide for visit day

  • Obtain transcript, resume

  • Copy employment application

  • Faculty references are useful in screening

  • Collect applicant’s publications (may clarify certain points)

  • Copies to everyone on itinerary at least two days in advance


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THE VISIT

  • Planning the visit

  • The manager extends invitation by phone & confirms by letter

  • Instructions regarding travel & hotel accommodations are sent

  • Letter of welcome from hotel manager awaits on arrival

  • Hotel provides packet with next day’s itinerary & other descriptive materials about company

  • Special plans made for spouse (if invited)


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THE VISIT

  • Guides Activities

  • Meets applicant for dinner or breakfast

  • Advises applicant about the staff and how departments he/she may join fits into organization

  • Reviews interview schedule and time spent with each staff member

  • Provides tour through the facility for the applicant

  • Insures that management reviews personnel practices, policies, salary and employee benefits

  • Provides reimbursement of applicant’s expenses

  • Conducts wrap-up interview to get applicant’s impressions

  • Advises applicant when a final decision will be made

  • Escorts candidate back to hotel or airport


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THE INTERVIEW

  • Purpose of the Interview

  • Determine applicant’s qualifications for a specific opening

  • Inform the applicant about the position and the organization, including its policies and practices

  • Create feeling of good will toward company


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THE INTERVIEW

  • Basic Steps in Interview

  • Review Resume/Application (prior to interview)

  • Greet Applicant and Introduce Yourself

  • Put Applicant at Ease (informal relaxed atmosphere)

  • Encourage Applicant to talk freely – ask questions requiring explanations

  • Start Topics Applicants Ready to Talk About – college, work experiences vocational interests

  • Explore Key Areas:


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THE INTERVIEW

  • Basic Steps in Interview

  • Review Resume/Application (prior to interview)

  • Greet Applicant and Introduce Yourself

  • Put Applicant at Ease (informal relaxed atmosphere)

  • Encourage Applicant to talk freely – ask questions requiring explanations

  • Start Topics Applicants Ready to Talk About – college, work experiences vocational interests

  • Explore Key Areas:

Background and Accomplishments – Academic standing, extracurricular and social activities, work history, leadership experiences

Intellectual Qualities – Mental alertness, self-expression, judgment, creativity, aptitudes, interests

Motivation – Initiative, drive, enthusiasm, perseverance, energy

Emotional Maturity – Stability, emotional response, attitude toward responsibilities, reaction to difficulties, sense of proportion and realistic self-concept

Human Relation Skills – Manner of relating, warmth, understanding of others, tolerance and sense of humor


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THE INTERVIEW

  • Basic Steps in Interview

  • Review Resume/Application (prior to interview)

  • Greet Applicant and Introduce Yourself

  • Put Applicant at Ease (informal relaxed atmosphere)

  • Encourage Applicant to talk freely – ask questions requiring explanations

  • Start Topics Applicants Ready to Talk About – college, work experiences vocational interests

  • Explore Key Areas:

Background and Accomplishments – Academic standing, extracurricular and social activities, work history, leadership experiences

Intellectual Qualities – Mental alertness, self-expression, judgment, creativity, aptitudes, interests

Motivation – Initiative, drive, enthusiasm, perseverance, energy

Emotional Maturity – Stability, emotional response, attitude toward responsibilities, reaction to difficulties, sense of proportion and realistic self-concept

Human Relation Skills – Manner of relating, warmth, understanding of others, tolerance and sense of humor

  • Tell About Company – Highlight, Growth, Future Plans

  • Describe Job Opportunities – Current & Advancements

  • Answer Questions

  • Tell what Happen Next – Next interview or decision

  • Thank Applicant

  • Record Impressions – immediately

  • Make Final Decision

  • Follow up – within two weeks


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THE INTERVIEW

Discussion of things lawful and unlawful to ask in interview


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THE APPRAISAL

Technical Skills – Possesses strong basic knowledge and skillful techniques in specific field, coupled with breadth of technical interests, applicable to a broad range of problems relevant to our work; recognized expertise through schooling, reports & publications.

Communication Skills – Effective, articulate oral communicator; Skillful written communicator; Effective listener; Reads with high level of retention


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THE APPRAISAL

Personal Behavioral Skills – Possess high level of initiative; aggressive in the achievement of results; Highly adaptable, flexible and willing to take on a variety of assignments; Enthusiastic, positive attitude, really gets involved in work to be accomplished; Good interpersonal skills, relates well with others; Has strong desire to achieve and sets high goals with a realistic knowledge of strengths and limitations; Readily accepts full responsibility for assignments; Willing to express and explore ideas with others and be open and receptive to the ideas of others; Independent, self-confident and out going; Energetic and tenacious, puts forth extra time and effort to achieve results; Maintains programs of self-study and uses job assignments as major vehicle for learning and growing; Doesn’t worry about stability and security.


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THE APPRAISAL

Promotional/entrepreneurial Skills – Thinks in terms of sponsor/employer’s problem from sponsor/employer’s viewpoint, employs integrative approach to employer’s problem; Strong technical marketing competitiveness; competitive in seeking out and getting work for self as required; Able to deal with alternatives and degrees of risk, willing to gamble and take calculated risks; Maintains effective, continuing sponsor relations; Consistently develops follow-up projects.


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THE APPRAISAL

Creative Skills – Imaginative approach to problems; Designs and fabricates novel devices, methods and techniques; Conceives opportunities for contract projects/research in his/her field and related fields.

Operational/Administrative Skills – Plans and organizes work effectively, good business sense, develops realistic cost and time estimates, operates within cost and time constraints; Sets high work goals and achieves goals.

Leadership Skills – Continuously in demand because of recognized expertise and record of successful accomplishments; Technical counsel frequently sought out by peers; Delegates work effectively to others.


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THE OFFER

  • The offer letter should go out within two weeks and include:

  • Job Title and Division/Department

  • Starting Salary and COLA

  • Reporting Relationships

  • Medical Contingencies and References

  • Employee Benefits and Relocation Matters

  • Acceptance and Proposed Starting Dates


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