Lateral navigation buoys
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Lateral navigation buoys. Upstream direction: is the direction taken by a vessel when proceeding from seaward, toward the headwaters of a river, into a harbour or with the flood tide. Keep all solid green buoys on your port (left) side when moving in the upstream direction. Memory tip

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Lateral navigation buoys

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Lateral navigation buoys

Lateral navigation buoys

Upstream direction: is the direction taken by a vessel when proceeding from seaward, toward the headwaters of a river, into a harbour or with the flood tide

Keep all solid green buoys on your port (left) side when moving in the upstream direction.

Memory tip

-green on left, red on right (match up the r’s)


Lateral navigation buoys1

Lateral navigation buoys

Keep all solid red buoys on your starboard (right) side when moving in the upstream direction. Memory tip

-green on left, red on right (match up the r’s)


Bifurcation buoys

Bifurcation Buoys

You may pass buoys with red and green bands on either side in the upstream direction. The main or preferred channel is shown by the colour of the top band. For example, you should keep the buoys pictured here on your port (left) side.

Memory tip-more green- keep on port side-More red- keep on starboard side


Bifurcation buoys1

Bifurcation Buoys

You may pass buoys with red and green bands on either side in the upstream direction. The main or preferred channel is shown by the colour of the top band. For example, you should keep the buoys pictured here on your starboard (right) side. Memory tip-more green- keep on port side-More red- keep on starboard side


Fairway buoys

Fairway Buoys

You may pass these buoys on either side, but when it is marking the middle a channel it should be kept on your port (left) side.

Memory tip- white with red- stay to the right


Cardinal buoys

Cardinal Buoys

Cardinal buoys, marked in yellow and black, show where the deepest or safest water is. The North, East, South and West cardinal buoys are distinguished by their colour pattern, and by their top marks.


Cardinal buoys1

Cardinal Buoys

The North cardinal buoy is black on top and yellow on bottom. The safe water lies to the north of this buoy.

Memory tips

- Arrows point up for north- down for south

-North and south both only two bands

-colours- think alphabetical

n/s b/y- ie. N before S just like B before Y- whatever is on top has the power


Cardinal buoys2

Cardinal Buoys

The South cardinal buoy is yellow on top and black on bottom. The safe water lies to the south of this buoy. Memory tips

- Arrows point down for south

-North and south both only two bands

-colours- think reverse alphabetical

s/n y/b- ie. S After N just like Y after B- whatever on top has power


Cardinal buoys3

Cardinal Buoys

The East cardinal buoy is black with a yellow band. The safe water lies to the east of this buoy.

Memory tips

-east and west have three bands

-alphabetical- b closer to e in alphabet than y- therefore b is east

One on top has power

-arrows look like a printed e


Cardinal buoys4

Cardinal Buoys

The West cardinal buoy is yellow with a black band. The safe water lies to the west of this buoy.

Memory tips

-east and west have three bands

-alphabetical- Y closer to W in alphabet than E- therefore Y is West

One on top has power

-arrows have shape of one half of W


Special purpose buoys anchorage buoys

Special Purpose Buoys-Anchorage Buoys

Buoys with the anchor symbol mark the perimeter of designated anchorage areas. Before anchoring, consult your charts for water depths.

Memory tip- look for anchor symbol


Special purpose buoys cautionary buoys

Special Purpose Buoys-Cautionary Buoys

Yellow buoys mark danger areas, such as military exercise areas, underwater structures, race courses, seaplane bases, or areas where there is no through or safe channel. Consult your charts for details on the danger.

Memory tip- yellow means caution


Special purpose buoys mooring buoys

Special Purpose Buoys-Mooring Buoys

These buoys are used for mooring or securing vessels.

Memory tip

Red over white- stay for the night


Special purpose buoys keep out buoys

Special Purpose Buoys-Keep Out Buoys

Buoys with this symbol mean Keep Out. They mark areas where boats are prohibited.

Memory tip- orange X- keep out


Special purpose buoys control buoys

Special Purpose Buoys-Control Buoys

Buoys with this symbol indicate special rules, such as speed limits or wash restrictions. Obey the restriction shown inside the orange circle.

Memory tip- orange circle = speed limit


Special purpose buoys information buoys

Special Purpose Buoys-Information Buoys

Buoys with this symbol display information such as locality, name, marina, campsite, etc.

Memory tip-

Square = nerd = information


Isolated danger buoys

Isolated Danger Buoys


Diving

Diving

Code Flag A

This flag indicated, "I have a diver down. Keep well clear at slow speed." Collision Regulations require that small vessels engaged in diving operations must display a rigid replica of this flag when restricted in their ability to manoeuvre.

Memory tip- arrow pointing into the water- diver down


Diving1

Diving

Diving Buoy Flag

This flag is required by Private Buoy Regulations and indicates areas where scuba diving is in progress. Again, stay well clear and proceed with caution.

Memory tip- flag- diving- red caution- white looks like scuba tank??


Distress flares

Distress Flares

The Parachute flare is easily seen from the surface or the air, and burns at least 40 seconds.


Distress flares1

Distress Flares

The "Multi-star" flare is also easily seen from the surface or the air. It burns four to five seconds. (If a single star shell is used, two shells should be carried for every flare.)


Distress flares2

Distress Flares

The hand held flare is less easily seen from the surface. (When using this flare do not look at it directly, and hold it downwind and well clear of the vessel.)


Distress flares3

Distress Flares

The smoke flare is used as a day distress signal only. It may not be mandatory for your vessel.

All flares should be stored in a watertight container, in a cool dry location. Flares are valid for four years from date of manufacture, and should be disposed of after that time.


Weather warnings

Weather Warnings

Marine weather forecasts include four types of severe weather warnings: small craft, gale, storm, and hurricane force winds. The meanings of these warnings are described below.


Weather warnings1

Weather Warnings

Small Craft Warning

Winds 20-33 knots Wave Heights 2-3 metres


Weather warnings2

Weather Warnings

Gale Warning

Winds 34-47 knots Wave Heights 6-9 metres


Weather warnings3

Weather Warnings

Storm Warning

Winds 46–63 knots Wave Heights 9–16 metres


Weather warnings4

Weather Warnings

Hurricane Force Warning

Winds 64 knots and over Wave Heights over 16 metres


Hypothermia

Hypothermia

Hypothermia - the loss of body heat - is the greatest danger for anyone in the water. As the body loses its heat, body functions slow down. This can quickly lead to death.

There are three critical areas where the body loses heat most quickly: the head and neck, the sides of the chest, and the groin region.


Lateral navigation buoys

HELP

The Heat Escape Lessening Position ê protects the critical body areas and slows down the loss of heat. Get into this position if you are alone in the water.

If two or more people are in the water together, form a huddle so that the sides of your bodies are close together.


Standard marine distress signals

Standard Marine Distress Signals

Code Flags

N over C


Standard marine distress signals1

Standard Marine Distress Signals

Distress Cloth


Standard marine distress signals2

Standard Marine Distress Signals

Sound Signals

Continuous: Foghorn, bell, whistle.

1-minute intervals: Gun or any explosive


Standard marine distress signals3

Standard Marine Distress Signals

  • Flashlight

  • Arm Signal

  • Do not use near helicopter (different meaning)

  • Flame on Vessel

  • as from burning tar, oil in barrel, etc.

  • Dye Marker


Hulls

Hulls

A Planing Hull is designed to lift (or plane) onto the top of the water as the boat gains speed. Most small powerboats utilize planing type hulls

- A Displacement Hull is designed to travel through the water using an efficient amount of propulsion. Larger vessels are typically designed with displacement hulls because of their large size

and drafts

- A Pontoon Hull utilizes two or more pontoons to create lift and flotation. Pontoon hulls typically have flat decks and may be fitted with or without a cabin


Hulls cont

Hulls cont.

Round-Bottom: Typical to sailboats, round-bottom hulls are not as stable and tend to roll in waves and rough water conditions

- Flat-Bottom: Typical to some ski-boats or smaller craft like rowboats, flat-bottom hulls offer a more stable platform but tend to “bounce” or “slap” the water in rough conditions

- Vee-Bottom: The most common type of power-boat hull, a vee-bottom hull is shaped like a “v” and can cut through rough water

- Multi-Chine Hull: Multi-hull craft, such as catamarans, are very stable but can be more difficult to manoeuvre


Lateral navigation buoys

Bow

The forward part or front section of a pleasure craft is defined as the bow.

Stern

The rearward part or rear section of a pleasure craft is defined as the stern.

Transom

The stern cross-section of a boat. The transom forms the back of the boat.


Lateral navigation buoys

Draft

Draft is defined as the depth of water that a boat needs in order to float freely. A boat’s draft is measured as the distance from the vessel’s waterline to the lowest point of the hull. If a vessel is equipped with an outboard motor or stern drive, the draft is the distance from the waterline to the lowest point on the engine.

Freeboard

Freeboard is considered to be the distance from the top

of the deck to the waterline.


Lateral navigation buoys

Length

A boat’s length is defined as the distance from the tip of the bow to the farthest point on the stern (measured in a straight line). If the boat is equipped with a swim platform it is not considered as part of the boat’s overall length.

Beam

A boat’s beam is defined as the width of a boat at its widest point.


Lateral navigation buoys

http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/marinesafety/debs-obs-operation-rules-menu-359.htm

http://boating.ncf.ca/rules.html


Lateral navigation buoys

http://www.safeboater.com/studyguide.asp

http://www.safeboater.com/studyguide3-4.asp


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