EFCE Bologna Recommendations
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Dr.-Ing. Martin Molzahn, D – Weisenheim am Berg Prof. dr. ing. J ørgen Løvland, N - Trondheim PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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EFCE Bologna Recommendations Recommendations for Chemical Engineering Education in a Bologna Two Cycle Degree System (Draft as of Mai 2005). Dr.-Ing. Martin Molzahn, D – Weisenheim am Berg Prof. dr. ing. J ørgen Løvland, N - Trondheim EFCE WP on Education

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Dr.-Ing. Martin Molzahn, D – Weisenheim am Berg Prof. dr. ing. J ørgen Løvland, N - Trondheim

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Dr ing martin molzahn d weisenheim am berg prof dr ing j rgen l vland n trondheim

EFCE Bologna Recommendations Recommendations for Chemical Engineering Education in a Bologna Two Cycle Degree System(Draft as of Mai 2005)

Dr.-Ing. Martin Molzahn, D – Weisenheim am Berg

Prof. dr. ing. Jørgen Løvland, N - Trondheim

EFCE WP on Education

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


Outline

Outline

  • The Bologna Process

    • Objectives, milestones

  • EFCE policy on Bologna Process

  • EFCE Bologna Recommendations

    • Introduction

    • Learning outcomes

      • General chemical engineering skills and knowledge

      • Transferable skills

    • Achieving the learning outcomes

      • Core curriculum

      • Teaching and learning

      • Industrial experience

      • Review of the educational process

      • Student assessment

  • Conclusion

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


Bologna process main objectives elements

Bologna Process: Main Objectives / Elements

  • To establish the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) by 2010 by:

  • Adoption of a system of easily readable and comparable degrees, also through the implementation of the Diploma Supplement

  • Adoption of a system essentially based on two main cycles, undergraduate and graduate.

    • Access to the second shall require successful completion of first cycle studies, lasting a minimum of three years. The degree awarded after the first cycle shall also be relevant to the European labour market as an appropriate level of qualification.

  • Establishment of a system of credits – such as in the ECTS – as a proper means of promoting the most widespread student mobility.

  • Promotion of mobility by overcoming obstacles to the effective exercise of free movement

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


Bologna process why

Bologna Process: Why?

  • National systems of higher education in Europe become more and more hindrances for the mobility of students and employees

    • Degrees most often awarded and accredited on a national basis, but to be recognized by the international labour market

  • Attraction of European higher education to students and professors of other parts of the world decreased continuously:

    • Problems with the readability and the recognition of degrees

  • European students asking increasingly for transnational programmes

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


Bologna process milestones

Bologna Process: Milestones

  • 1998: Sorbonne (France, Germany, Italy, UK)

    • Initiative to harmonize the European Higher Education System

  • 1999: Bologna Declaration (30 (45) countries)

    • To establish the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) by 2010

  • 2001: Prague (1st follow-up conference)

    • promotion of life long learning

    • enhancing attractiveness and competitiveness of the European Higher Education Area to other parts of the world

  • 2003: Berlin (2nd follow-up conference, http://www.bologna-berlin2003.de)

    • To speed up the process

    • National quality assurance systems completed by 2005

    • Second cycle degrees should give access to doctoral studies

  • 2005: Bergen (3rd follow-up conference, http://www.bologna-bergen2005.no)

    • Statement on HE and research (third cycle 3 - 4 years full time)

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


Efce policy on the bologna process

EFCE Policy on the Bologna Process*)

  • EFCE welcomes and supports the idea of establishing a European Higher Education Area

  • EFCE is willing to co-operate with all parties involved in the Bologna Process

  • EFCE will take into account the merits and benefits of existing engineering education as well as of the role of Chemical Engineering in the participating countries

  • EFCE believes that a reasonable degree of diversity in the training of Chemical Engineers is desirable

*) ChERD (Trans. IChemE), 81/A10, 1406, November 2003; http://www.efce.info

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


Efce bologna recommendations

EFCE Bologna Recommendations

  • Introduction

    • Referring to the EFCE Statement on Bologna Process

    • Referring to the 2001 and 2003 communiqués of the Conferences of Ministers responsible for Higher Education:

      • …, degrees should have different defined outcomes. First and second cycle degrees should have different orientations and various profiles in order to accommodate a diversity of individual, academic and labour market needs.

    • Learning outcomes formulated in a general way

    • Reflecting the wide area of industries employing Chemical Engineers coming out of different ways of education

    • Core curricula:

      • Covering approx. 2/3 of a first and a second level degree programme

      • Giving space for specialization and broadening

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


The diversity of chemical engineering curricula

Chemical Engineering

France Germany (CIW)Poland Norway Spain UK

USA

GermanySwitzerland

Verfahrens-technik

UKUniversity Chemistry Depts.

France Ecoles de Chimie

Germany Technische Chemie

GermanyMaschinenbau

Mechanical Engineering

Chemistry and Physical Chemistry

The diversity of Chemical Engineering curricula

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


First cycle degree ce outcomes

First cycle degree CE outcomes

  • After graduation, a first level degree chemical engineer should:

    • have a knowledge of relevant basic sciences (mathematics, chemistry, molecular biology, physics) to help understand, describe and deal with chemical engineering phenomena

    • understand the basic principles underlying chemical engineering:

      • material, energy, momentum balances

      • equilibrium

      • rate processes (chemical reaction, mass, heat, momentum transfer)

    • and be able to use them to set up and to solve (analytically, numerically, graphically) a variety of chemical engineering problems

    • understand the main concepts of process control

    • understand the principles underlying methods of process/product measurements

    • be able to plan, perform, explain and report simple experiments

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


First cycle degree ce outcomes contd

First cycle degree CE outcomes (contd.)

  • Further, after graduation, a first level degree chemical engineer should:

    • have a knowledge of relevant literature and data sources

    • have a basic understanding of health, safety, and environmental issues

    • understand the concept of sustainability

    • understand basic concepts of chemical product engineering

    • have knowledge of some practical applications of process and product engineering

    • have an ability to analyse complex problems in the chosen orientation

    • have some experience in using appropriate software

    • be able to perform appropriate design in the chosen orientation

    • be able to calculate process and project costs

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


Second cycle degree ce outcomes

Second cycle degree CE outcomes

  • A second cycle degree study will be characterized by greater differentiation both between institutions and between students.

  • After graduation, a second level degree chemical engineer should

    • be more proficient in the first level competencies in the chosen orientation

    • use deeper knowledge of the underlying phenomena to build more advanced models

    • be able to use appropriate computational tools

    • be able to perform more advanced experiments and to give more advancedinterpretations of the results

    • be able to analyze, evaluate and compare relevant alternatives in the chosen orientation

    • be able to synthesize and optimize novel solutions

    • be able to self-study a topic in depth

  • Final outcomes of a second cycle degree programme to be (at least) equivalent to those of traditional long-cycle (4,5 – 5 years) programmes.

  • Graduates to be able to work as research engineers and to go for doctoral studies.

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


Transferable skills

Transferable skills

  • An engineering education should give the engineer a number of transferable skills, which are more or less independent of the type of engineering. These skills are not specific to the core or to the degree level, but will be acquired to some extent in the first level study and will be deepened in the second.

  • After graduation, an engineer should

    • be able to communicate effectively, including in English, using modern presentation tools as appropriate

    • be able to work in multidisciplinary teams

    • have an understanding of the impact of engineering solutions in an environmental and societal context

    • have an understanding of professional end ethical responsibility

    • be able to learn on his/her own, and have a recognition of the need for life-long learning

EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


First cycle degree core curriculum

First cycle degree core curriculum

  • Science and mathematics: min. 45 ECTU

    • Mathematics, statistics, numerical methods, information science, physics, chemistry and biology (incl. laboratory)

  • Chemical engineering: min. 65 ECTU

    • Material and energy balance calculations, thermodynamics / physical chemistry, fluid dynamics, separations (mechanical, equilibrium and mass transfer based), heat transfer, reaction engineering, materials of construction, basic product engineering,process control and instrumentation, process analytical techniques, safety, health, environment, chemical engineering laboratory, first cycle thesis / chemical engineering project

  • Non-technical topics:min. 10 ECTU

    • Economics ….

  • Total:min. 120 ECTU

  • EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


    Second cycle degree core curriculum

    Second cycle degree core curriculum

    • Science and mathematics:min 15 ECTU

    • Chemical engineering topics:min 40 ECTU

    • Second cycle thesis / Chemical engineeringproject:min 20 ECTU

    • Total:min 75 ECTU

      Although no topics are specified here it is clear from the recommended learning outcomes that central chemical engineering topics such as transport phenomena, chemical reaction engineering, dynamic modelling as well as topics such as statistics/optimization/parameter estimation must be included to the extent they have not been covered in the first cycle study.

    EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


    Teaching and learning

    Teaching and learning

    • Teaching and learning methods

      • To be appropriate for the topic in question

      • To develop students’ skills to work independently and in teams

      • To include

        • Group work and communication tasks

        • Self-study and problem solving tasks

        • Suitable examples for illustration and discussion of ethical, societal, environmental and professional issues

    • Courses to show the broad applicability of chemical engineering methods

    EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


    Industrial experience

    Industrial experience

    • Industry has to play an important role in the formation of engineers

    • Industrial experience

      • serves to illustrate the applications and limitations of theory

      • helps to set the courses in a wider context

      • motivates for the remaining study

      • provides social skills for later leadership roles

    • Industrial experience for all can only be obtained if industry accepts the responsibility of providing sufficient placements

    EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


    Assessment

    Assessment

    • Review of the educational process

      • Each educational institution should have an ongoing review of the educational process, to ensure that

        • the parts are up to date and properly coordinated

        • that each and every part contributes towards the aims of the course

          and in general to improve the educational outcomes

    • Student assessment

      • EFCE would like to emphasize the need for appropriate feed-back to maximise the learning effect of the assessments

    EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


    Conclusion

    Conclusion

    • EFCE WP on Education prepared draft EFCE Bologna Recommendations for Chemical Engineering Education in a Bologna Two cycle Degree system covering:

      • Learning outcomes:

        • general chemical engineering skills and knowledge

        • transferable skills

      • Means to achieve the learning outcomes:

        • Core curriculum (approx. 2/3 of full programmes)

        • Teaching and learning

        • Review of the educational process

        • Student assessment

    • EFCE WP chairmen brought in some further suggestions

    • Recommendations to be published soon

    • Comments welcome

    EURECHA Workshop, ESCAPE 15, Barcelona, 31 May 2005


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