Reading between the lines a metacognitive approach to deep reading
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Reading Between the Lines: A Metacognitive Approach to Deep Reading. 2013 CRLA Conference Presenters: Allen Williams and Leonard Geddes. Kate Chopin – “The Story of an Hour”. Please take about five minutes to read through the short story. Think about :

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Reading Between the Lines: A Metacognitive Approach to Deep Reading

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Reading Between the Lines: A Metacognitive Approach to Deep Reading

2013 CRLA Conference

Presenters: Allen Williams and Leonard Geddes


Kate Chopin – “The Story of an Hour”

  • Please take about five minutes to read through the short story.

    Think about:

  • Your immediate reaction to the story and its ending?

  • What’s important about the story?


Metacognition

  • “an appreciation of what one already knows, together with a correct apprehension of the learning task and what knowledge and skills it requires, combined with the agility to make correct inferences about how to apply one’s strategic knowledge to a particular situation, and to do so efficiently and reliably.”

  • Taylor, S. (1999). Better learning through better thinking: Developing students’ metacognitive abilities. Journal of College Reading and Learning , 34-45.C


What must I know?

What do I know?

How do I get to what I need to know?

What will I be able to do once I am there?

What strategies will get me to what I need to know?

What’s the quickest and surest way of getting there?


Relationship Between Metacognition and Critical Thinking

“Critical thinking can be seen as having two components:

  • a set of information and belief generating and processing skills, and

  • the habit, based on intellectual commitment, of using those skills to guide behavior” (Scriven & Paul, 1987).

    http://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/defining-critical-thinking/766


Applied Critical Thinking: Invisible Man

  • Real student examples of remembering, understanding, applying, and analyzing from writing assignments based on Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man.

  • What might examples of evaluating and creating look like when applied to literary study?


Instructional Design and Metacognitive Instruction

  • Metacognitive instruction is an approach to teaching that incorporates both the course content and ways of thinking about content into the instructional design.


Scaffolding Example: Deliverance


Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

  • independently and analytically read a variety of literary texts and express their comprehension through various tasks;

  • identify literary devices that are used to represent abstract ideas or qualities;

  • provide meaningful, content-focused contributions to class discussions;

  • collaboratively work with peers on complex projects and assignments;

  • independently write coherent, well-supported arguments about text;

  • evaluate, design and create texts for a variety of purposes and audiences;

  • and express knowledge and comprehension of major texts and traditions of language and literature written in English as well as their social, cultural, theoretical, and historical contexts.


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