An introduction to poetry
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An Introduction to Poetry. Carpe Diem : “pluck the day” A theme which conveys the idea of making the most of your time A theme is really just the big picture idea Frequently characterized by images of nature Why?. Carpe Diem!. Books have paragraphs; poems have stanzas

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Carpe diem

  • Carpe Diem: “pluck the day”

  • A theme which conveys the idea of making the most of your time

    • A theme is really just the big picture idea

  • Frequently characterized by images of nature

    • Why?

Carpe Diem!


The structure of poems stanzas

The Structure of Poems: Stanzas


Sounds in poetry

Sounds in Poetry


Rhyming couplets an example of end rhyme

Rhyming Couplets(An Example of End Rhyme)


Internal rhyme

  • Can occur with: was born to set it right!” -Hamlet

    • 2+ words in the same line

    • 2+ words in the middle of two separate lines

    • A word at the end of a line and 1+ word in the middle of the following line

Internal Rhyme


Sounds in poetry internal rhyme end rhyme

  • Once upon a midnight was born to set it right!” -Hamletdreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, / Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, / While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, / As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. “The Raven”

Sounds in Poetry:Internal Rhyme & End Rhyme


Sounds in poetry1

Sounds in Poetry


Common literary devices in poetry

Common Literary Devices in Poetry


Common literary devices in poetry1

Common Literary Devices in Poetry


Common literary devices in poetry2

  • Paradox: A seeming contradiction five senses

  • Personification: A figure of speech in which things/ideas are given human attributes

  • Conceit: An extended metaphor

Common Literary Devices in Poetry


Sonnets

  • There are five sensestwo main types of sonnets: Shakespearean and Petrarchan

  • A sonnet has 14 lines, 10 syllables per line, and a specific rhyme scheme depending on the type

Sonnets


Petrarchan sonnets

Petrarchan Sonnets


Shakespearean sonnets

Shakespearean Sonnets


Time to practice

I dropped the lo couplet (2 lines)cket in the thick mud

I made my way to the lake

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers

  • Alliteration

  • Assonance

  • Consonance

Time to Practice!


Time to practice name that sonnet type

First 8 Lines from “Sonnet 18” couplet (2 lines)

“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

Thou art more lovely and more temperate:

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,

And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,

And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;

And every fair from fair sometimes declines,

By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimm’d”

Time to Practice!Name that Sonnet Type


Time to practice name that sonnet type1

First 8 Lines from “ couplet (2 lines)SoleasiNel Mio Cor”

“She ruled in beauty o’er this heart of mine,

A noble lady in a humble home,

And now her time for heavenly bliss has come,

‘Tis I am mortal proved, and she divine.

The soul that all its blessings must resign,

And love whose light no more on earth finds room,

Might rend the rocks with pity for their doom,

Yet none their sorrows can in words enshrine;”

Time to Practice!Name that Sonnet Type


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