Insurance claims and privacy a rapidly changing landscape l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 24

Insurance Claims and Privacy: A Rapidly Changing Landscape PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 168 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Insurance Claims and Privacy: A Rapidly Changing Landscape. Ann Cavoukian, Ph.D. Information & Privacy Commissioner/Ontario CICMA and CIAA Joint Conference February 3, 2004. Impetus for Change. Growth of privacy as a global issue EU Directive on Data Protection

Download Presentation

Insurance Claims and Privacy: A Rapidly Changing Landscape

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Insurance claims and privacy a rapidly changing landscape l.jpg

Insurance Claims and Privacy: A Rapidly Changing Landscape

Ann Cavoukian, Ph.D.

Information & Privacy Commissioner/Ontario

CICMA and CIAA Joint Conference

February 3, 2004


Impetus for change l.jpg

Impetusfor Change

  • Growth of privacy as a global issue

  • EU Directive on Data Protection

  • Increasing amounts of personal data collected, consolidated, aggregated

  • Consumer backlash; heightened consumer expectations


Importance of consumer trust l.jpg

Importance of Consumer Trust

  • In the post-9/11 world:

    • Consumers either as concerned or more concerned about online privacy

    • Concerns focused on the business use of personal information, not new government surveillance powers

  • If consumers have confidence in a company’s privacy practices, they are more likely to:

    • Increase volume of business with company……....91%

    • Increase frequency of business……………….…...90%

    • Stop doing business with company if PI misused…83%

      Harris/Westin Poll, Nov. 2001 & Feb. 2002


How the public divides on privacy l.jpg

How The Public Divides on Privacy

The “Privacy Dynamic” - BattleDr. Alan Westin

for the minds of the pragmatists


Information privacy defined l.jpg

Information Privacy Defined

  • Information Privacy: Data Protection

    • Freedom of choice; control; informational self-determination

    • Personal control over the collection, use and disclosure of any recorded information about an identifiable individual


Fair information practices a brief history l.jpg

Fair Information Practices:A Brief History

  • OECD Guidelines on the Protection of Privacy and Transborder Flows of Personal Data

  • EU Directive on Data Protection

  • CSA Model Code for the Protection of Personal Information

  • Canada Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA)


Summary of fair information practices l.jpg

Summary of Fair Information Practices

  • Accountability

  • Identifying Purposes

  • Consent

  • Limiting Collection

  • Limiting Use, Disclosure, Retention

  • Accuracy

  • Safeguards

  • Openness

  • Individual Access

  • Challenging Compliance


Federal private sector privacy legislation l.jpg

Federal Private-Sector Privacy Legislation

  • Personal Information Protection and Electronic Document Act(PIPEDA)

  • Staggered implementation:

    • Federally regulated businesses, 2001

    • Federal health sector, 2002

    • Provincially regulated private sector, 2004


Extension of pipeda l.jpg

Extension of PIPEDA

  • As of January 1, 2004, PIPEDA has extended to:

     all personal information collected, used or disclosed in the course of commercial activities by provincially regulated organizations (including insurance companies and independent insurance adjusters)

     unless a substantially similar provincial privacy law is in force


Provincial private sector privacy laws l.jpg

Provincial Private-Sector Privacy Laws

Québec: Act respecting the protection of personal information in the private sector

B.C.: Personal Information Protection Act

Alberta:Personal Information Protection Act

Ontario: draft Privacy of Personal Information Act, 2002 – not introduced…so PIPEDA applies


Pipeda general consent rule l.jpg

PIPEDA – General Consent Rule

  • Assume insurance company and adjuster are in Ontario (PIPEDA applies)

  • Knowledge and consent of the individual are required for the collection, use, or disclosure of personal information, except where inappropriate

  • In insurance claims where there is no suspicion of fraud, adjuster should only collect, use and disclose personal information with knowledge and consent of policyholder


Fraud investigations l.jpg

Fraud Investigations

  • Privacy is not an absolute right – it needs to be balanced against other interests

  • PIPEDA recognizes public interest in collecting, using and disclosing personal information without knowledge and consent of individual for fraud investigations


Consent exceptions in pipeda l.jpg

Consent Exceptions in PIPEDA

  • “Investigative bodies” designated in regulations may receive and disclose personal information without knowledge and consent of individual to investigate a breach of an agreement or a contravention of the laws of Canada or a province


Pipeda regulations l.jpg

PIPEDA Regulations

  • November 6, 2003 – Industry Canada issued notice to amend PIPEDA regulations to include additional organizations as “investigative bodies”

  • Insurance adjusters and private investigators included in proposed list (among others)

  • Amended regulation expected to come into effect very soon (within the next month)


Protecting privacy during investigations l.jpg

Protecting Privacy During Investigations

  • “Investigative body” status will not give insurance adjusters unlimited power to collect, use and disclose personal information without consent

  • Adjusters should only collect, use and disclose minimum amount of personal information necessary for purposes of investigation

  • They should also ensure that any third parties that are retained (e.g., private investigators) do not violate privacy laws when assisting with claims investigations


Personal health information l.jpg

Personal Health Information

  • For some claims, insurance adjusters collect, use and disclose policyholder’s personal health information (PHI), which is considered highly sensitive

  • Justice Krever’s Report on the Confidentiality of Health Information, 1980

  • The IPC has been calling for legislation to protect personal health information since 1987


Provincial health privacy laws l.jpg

Provincial Health Privacy Laws

Alberta

Health Information Act

Manitoba

Personal Health Information Act

Saskatchewan

Health Information Protection Act


Ontario health information protection act 2003 hipa l.jpg

Ontario: Health Information Protection Act, 2003 (HIPA)

  • Ontario government introduced health privacy bill (Bill 31) on December 17, 2003

  • Referred to Standing Committee on General Government, which is currently holding public hearings and receiving submissions

  • Expected to come into effect July, 2004


General principles l.jpg

General Principles

  • HIPA establishes rules governing the collection, use and disclosure of personal health information by health information custodians and other persons

  • Health information custodians are defined as persons who have custody or control of personal health information as a result of the work that they do or in connection with the powers or duties they perform


Consent l.jpg

Consent

  • HIPA allows for implied consent for disclosure of PHI within a patient’s circle of care (e.g., from a family physician to a specialist or a lab for testing)

  • HIPA requires express consent for disclosure of PHI outside the circle of care (e.g., from a family physician to an insurance adjuster)


Disclosure without consent l.jpg

Disclosure Without Consent

  • HIPA allows health information custodians to disclose PHI without consent only in specific and limited circumstances (e.g., to reduce a risk of serious bodily harm to a group of persons)

  • Section 42 of HIPA deals with disclosures related to HIPA and other Acts


Investigations section 42 1 g l.jpg

Investigations – Section 42(1)(g)

  • Section 42(1)(g) of HIPA allows a health information custodian to disclose personal information about an individual “ … to a person carrying out an inspection, investigation or similar procedure that is authorized by a warrant or under an Act of Ontario or Canada for the purpose of complying with the warrant or that Act.”


Final thought l.jpg

Final Thought

  • The privacy landscape is rapidly changing

  • Be aware of both PIPEDA and Ontario’s proposed health privacy legislation (HIPA) when investigating and settling insurance claims


How to contact us l.jpg

How to Contact Us

Commissioner Ann Cavoukian

Information & Privacy Commissioner/Ontario

80 Bloor Street West, Suite 1700

Toronto, Ontario M5S 2V1

Phone: (416) 326-3333

Web: www.ipc.on.ca

E-mail: [email protected]


  • Login