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The catering cycle






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The catering cycle. Figure 1.1 After Cracknell et al . 2000. Comparison of traditional and systems approaches. Table 1.1 Source:  Records and Glennie (1991). Three systems in food and beverage operations. Operations hierarchy. Table 1.2. Dimensions of the hospitality industry’s product.
The catering cycle

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The catering cycle l.jpgSlide 1

The catering cycle

Figure 1.1

After Cracknell et al. 2000

Comparison of traditional and systems approaches l.jpgSlide 2

Comparison of traditional and systems approaches

Table 1.1

Source: Records and Glennie (1991)

Three systems in food and beverage operations l.jpgSlide 3

Three systems in food and beverage operations

Operations hierarchy l.jpgSlide 4

Operations hierarchy

Table 1.2

Dimensions of the hospitality industry s product l.jpgSlide 5

Dimensions of the hospitality industry’s product

  • Intangibility

  • Perishability

  • Simultaneous production and consumption

  • Ease of duplication

  • Heterogeneity

  • Variability of output

  • Difficulty of comparison

Customer satisfactions l.jpgSlide 6

Customer satisfactions

  • Physiological needs

  • Economic needs

  • Social needs

  • Psychological needs

  • Convenience needs

Customer dissatisfactions l.jpgSlide 7

Customer dissatisfactions

  • Controllable by the establishmente.g. scruffy, unhelpful staff, cramped conditions

  • Uncontrollablee.g. behaviour of other customers, the weather,transport problems

Reasons for eating out l.jpgSlide 8

Reasons for eating out

  • Convenience

  • Variety

  • Labour

  • Status

  • Culture / tradition

  • Impulse

  • No choice

Meal experience factors l.jpgSlide 9

Meal experience factors

  • Food and drink on offer

  • Level of service

  • Level of cleanliness and hygiene

  • Perceived value for money and price

  • Atmosphere of the establishment

Pestle factors l.jpgSlide 10

PESTLE factors

  • P Political

  • E Economic

  • S Socio-cultural

  • T Technological

  • L Legal

  • E Ecological

The five competitive forces l.jpgSlide 11

The five competitive forces

Figure 1.4  

Adapted with the permission of The Free Press, a Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc., from Competitive Advantage: Creating and Sustaining Superior Performance by Michael E. Porter. Copyright © 1985, 1998 by Michael E. Porter

European foundation for quality management excellence model l.jpgSlide 12

European Foundation for Quality Management Excellence Model

Figure 1.6  

Adapted from EFQM, 1999

Customer service versus resource productivity l.jpgSlide 13

Customer service versus resource productivity

Customer service Resource productivity

Figure 1.7

Integrated service quality management model l.jpgSlide 14

Integrated Service QualityManagement Model

Figure 1.8


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