Family involvement and trust in kindergarten and school
Download
1 / 17

Family Involvement and Trust in Kindergarten and School - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 173 Views
  • Uploaded on

Family Involvement and Trust in Kindergarten and School. Airi Niilo, Eve Kikas, Marika Veisson, Maris Hinn, Kerstin Kööp. Definitions Trust is (Adams & Christenson, 2000): confidence that another person acts in a way to benefit or sustain the relationship

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Family Involvement and Trust in Kindergarten and School' - Sophia


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Family involvement and trust in kindergarten and school

Family Involvement and Trust in Kindergarten and School

Airi Niilo, Eve Kikas,

Marika Veisson, Maris Hinn, Kerstin Kööp


  • Definitions

  • Trust is (Adams & Christenson, 2000):

  • confidence that another person acts in a way to benefit or sustain the relationship

  • implicit goals of the relationship to achieve positive outcomes for students

  • Family involvement is a multifaced construct with three dimensions (Fanruzzo et al. 2000):

  • home-based involvement

  • school-based involvement

  • home-school conferencing


Earlier studies: relations with other factors

Trust

Declines with age

Is associated with the frequency and quality of contact (Adams & Christenson, 2000)

Involvement

Highercollaboration in classes with higher trust (Tschannen-Moran, 2001).

Declines with age (Fantuzzo et al. 2000)

Lower in families with many children (Manz et al. 2004)

Differs in kindergartens and schools with different programs (Fantuzzo et al. 2000)


Aims

  • Adapt questionnaires for assessing trust and family involvement in Estonia

  • Investigate the level of these constructs in kindergarten and elementary school

  • Examine their relations with family and kindergarten characteristcs


Hypotheses 1
Hypotheses-1

  • The level of trust and involvement is higher in kindergarten and lower in school, with the exception of home-related involvement, which is the highest in first grades in school.

  • Trust is associated with the frequency and quality of parents’ contacts with teachers.

  • Trust is associated with parental involvement with the highest correlations with home-school conferencing


Hypotheses 2 kindergarten
Hypotheses-2 (kindergarten)

  • Trust and involvement are higher in kindergartens using Step by Step methodology than in those who do not use it systematically

  • Mothers of families’ with only or the eldest child trust teachers less than other parents


Participants and procedure

860 parents:

645 from kindergarten

206 from school (104 I level, 99 II level)

720 mothers:

546 from kindergarten

148 using Step by Step approach

398 others

174 from school (84 I level, 90 II level)

Data were collected in 2006


Questionnaires
Questionnaires

Trust was assessed with a questionnaire

adapted from Adams and Christenson (2000).

Family involvement was assessed with a

questionnaire adapted from

Family Involvement Questionnaire for Early

Childhood (Fantuzzo et al. 2000) and

Family Involvement Questionnaire for

Elementary School (Manz et al. 2004)


Results of mothers
Results of mothers

  • Kindergarten-school comparisons

  • Associations among different dimensions of trust and involvement

  • Kindergarten results: relations of trust and involvement with family and kindergarten characteristics


Mothers of Step by Step kindergarten trust kindergarten teachers more

Mothers of Step by Step kindergarten evaluate their frequency

and quality of contact higher


Mothers of Step by Step kindergarten are less involved with teachers more

educating their children at home


Mothers of the only child are more involved in their child’s

education at home than mothers of the youngest and middle child


Conclusions
Conclusions child’s

  • These were our prelimenary results. As this study is a part of a larger project we can follow these families from kindergarten to school. It would be interesting to see whether the differences between these parents remain the same or become more similar as the context and teachers have changed.


ad