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Maghrebian Prospects in Africa : Morocco. By Petra Patty. Outline. Introduction Politics : Foreign policy of Morocco towards Sub-saharan Africa Economics : Agreements regulating relations Figures of trade Investments : Banking Infrastructure Conclusions.

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Maghrebian prospects in africa morocco l.jpg

MaghrebianProspectsinAfrica:Morocco

By Petra Patty


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Outline

  • Introduction

  • Politics:

    • Foreign policy of MoroccotowardsSub-saharanAfrica

  • Economics:

    • Agreementsregulating relations

    • Figures of trade

    • Investments:

      • Banking

      • Infrastructure

  • Conclusions


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Foreign policy of Morocco towards Sub-saharan Africa

  • Twotypes of relations:

    • 1. Traditionallyfriendly: Senegal, Gabon, DR Congo, GuineeEquatorial, Mauritania, IvoryCoast

    • 2. Ones made tense, mainlyforpoliticalreasonstodowiththe Western Saharanconflict: Nigeria, South Africa, etc.

  • 1980’s:

    • 1984, Moroccoleavesthe Organization of AfricanUnity

    • Developing relations with Angola (1985), Cape Verde (1987)

    • 1986: Creation of AgenceMarocaine de CoopérationInternationale - AMCI


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Foreign policy of Morocco towards Sub-saharan Africa

  • 1990’s:

    • 150 different agreements by the middle of the decade

    • Other efforts: Somalia 1992-93, visits: 1996, etc

  • From 1999, King Mohammed VI.

    • Repeated annual visits from 2001, including Gabon, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Gambia

    • 25 embassies in Africa, 6 new representations by the end of 2010


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Foreign policy of Morocco towards Sub-saharan Africa

  • New direction of socialcooperation:

    • 2006: Niger foodcrisis

      • Hospitalization, stock of drugs, pesticides, etc.

    • 2004, visitsto Bénin, Cameroon, Gabon, Niger and Senegalsigningconventions

    • 180-268 millionsEuros of supporttoWest-African and CentralAfricancountries

    • Threesidedcooperations – NEPAD (New PartnershipforAfrica’sDvelopment)

  • Strategytowardleastdevelopingcountries:

    • 2000, European African Summit, Cairo

    • 2003, ExtraordinaryMinisterialConferenceforLeastDevelopedCountriesin Rabat

  • Intensions of workingtogetherwithorganizations:

    • 2000, UEMOA (West African Economic and Monetary Union)

    • 2001, joining COMESA (Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa)

    • 2002, ManoRiver Union Meeting in Rabat


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Agreements regulating relations

  • 2002, UEMOA (West AfricanEconomic and Monetary Union):

    • Trade and investmentonindustrial and agriculturalproducts

    • Nottakenaffectyet

  • 2004, visitsto Bénin, Cameroon, Gabon, Niger and Senegal:

    • Conventionsonnon-doubletaxation, encouragement of investment, projects: expertise and funds

    • Sea trade, mining, civil engineering, housing, water and education


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Agreements regulating relations

  • Strengthening relations, diversifying markets: bilateral economic and trade cooperations, classic or preferential, 17 countries

  • Mixed inter-state commissions

  • Private sector:

    • Official support

    • International forums

    • Studies on trade prospects

    • Organization for the support of export


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Current figures of trade

  • Global sum of trade:

    • 1990-1998: 300,6 milliondollarsonaverage per year

    • 1998-2008: 529 milliondollars

    • Commercial trade:

      • 101 milliondollars deficit onaverage per yearfortheperiod of 1990-98

      • 2008: 282,8 milliondollarexcess


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Currentfigures of trade

  • 2008, Moroccan export:

    • 4,46% toAfrica (Main markets: Senegal, Equatorial Guinea and IvoryCoast, Congo, Nigeria, Ghana, Angola)

    • 75,23% to EU

    • 6,9% toAsia

    • 2,72% to USA

  • Export byzones:

    • 27,2% to UEMOA

    • 19,31% to CEMAC – Economic and Monetary Union of CentralAfrica

    • 2% to SACU – Southern AfricanCustoms Union,

  • 170% increase of trade betweenMorocco and Sub-saharanAfrica:

    • 1998: 52,6 milliondollars

    • 2008: 1,4 billiondollars

    • Versus Tunisia: 107 milliondollars and Egypt: 320 milliondollars


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Current figures of trade

  • Main Sub-saharian suppliers of Morocco: Gabon, Congo, Central African Republic, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Sénégal, South Africa

  • Import by zones:

    • 59,82% from SACU

    • 17,5% from CEMAC

    • 11,63% from UEMOA


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Composition of export, 1998-2008:

Source : Chelem, calcul DEPF


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Composition of import, 1998-2008

Source : Chelem, calcul DEPF


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Current figures of trade

  • Relations with countries who recognize the RASD (Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic – or Western Sahara):

    • Rebuilding relations for the past 10 years

    • Moroccan economy more international

    • Retreat of recognition

    • South Africa: 210 million Euros in 2008

    • Nigeria: 60 million Euros in 2008

    • (720 million with Algeria)


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Investments

  • 2008: amongst the top 20 investors in Africa

  • Private sector:

    • Taking expertise and know-how to the continent

  • Strategic sectors:

    • Banking

    • Engineering

    • Telecommunication

    • Infrastructure (Royal Air Maroc)


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Banking: Attijariwafa Bank and BMCE

  • Firsttwomoroccangroupsoninternationalmarkets.

  • Attijariwafa Bank:

    • PresentinTunisia, Senegal (66,67% of Senegalo-tunisian Bank), Mali (51% of International Bank of Mali – 60 millionEuros)

    • GNP of thebank’ssubsidiariesin Western Africa: 1,47 billion DH, CentralAfrica: 539 million DH

    • 2009: took over 5 subsidiaries of Credit agricole: Congo, IvoryCoast, Cameroon, Gabon, Senegal, othersinplan: Burkina, Togo, Niger, Equatorial Guinea

    • 2010 April 29-30th, Casablanca

  • BMCE – BanqueMarocaine du CommerceExterieur:

    • Presentinabout 12 Africancountries

    • SubsidiaryinSenegal (BMCE Capital Dakar) loans 50 millionEurostothe port of Dakar.

    • 2007: acquisition of upto 35% of capitalofthe Bank of Africa (BOA)

    • 2008: received 70 million euro supportfromthe IFC (International FinanceCooperation)

    • International subsidiaries: 8,5% of net turnoverin 2008 – 74 millioneuros

    • Outside BOA, operatesinCongo-Brazzaville, Cameroon, Senegal and Tunisia


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Infrastructure: SOMAGEC, Groupe CCGT

  • SOMAGEC (SociétéMaghrébine de Génie Civil ):

    • Leadingbuilder of harbour and maritimeinfrastructureinMorocco, making a turnover of about 138 millionEurosin 2008.

    • Equatorial Guinea:

      • Subsidiary SOMAGEC GE

      • 2 500 employees

      • Builtportsin Malabo, Kogo and Annobón

      • Drinkingwaternetworkin Bata

      • Inthreeyears: 1,3 billionEuros

    • 2006: invitationtoapplyfor building the port of Dakar inSenegal

  • Groupe CCGT (Consortium des CanalisationdesGranulats et des Travaux):

    • Presentin Guinea for 12 years, Sierra-Leone aswellas Guinea-Bissau

    • Guinea: 70 million DH, agriculturalarea of 724 ha

    • Senegal: construction of a 230 km road


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Conclusion

  • Africa: alternative market to the european

  • Despite marked improvements in the past decade, only 5% of Morocco’s export goes to Africa

  • Still alot of potential:

    • Improved political stability

    • Economic transparency

    • Rise of purchasing power

  • Exemplary behaviour


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