Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema (1975) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Visual pleasure and narrative cinema 1975 l.jpg
Download
1 / 8

  • 339 Views
  • Updated On :
  • Presentation posted in: Music / Video

Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema (1975). Laura Mulvey. Fascination and film. Film fascinates us (engages our emotions), through images and spectacle

Related searches for Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema (1975)

I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.

Download Presentation

Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema (1975)

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Visual pleasure and narrative cinema 1975 l.jpg

Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema (1975)

Laura Mulvey


Fascination and film l.jpg

Fascination and film

  • Film fascinates us (engages our emotions), through images and spectacle

  • Mulvey uses psychoanalysis ‘to discover where and how the fascination of film is reinforced by pre-existing patterns of fascination already at work within the individual subject’ (= spectator)

  • She says she is using psychoanalytic theory ‘as a political weapon’


Cinema and pleasure l.jpg

Cinema and pleasure

  • Hollywood/mainstream/narrative cinema manipulates visual pleasure.

  • It ‘codes the erotic into the language of the dominant patriarchal order’.


Scopophilia l.jpg

Scopophilia

  • scopophilia = pleasure in looking (Sigmund Freud 1905, in ‘Three Essays’)

  • examples of the private and curious gaze: children’s voyeurism, cinematic looking

  • the most pleasurable looking = looking at the human form and the human face, figural looking (corresponds to psychic patterns)


Woman as image man as bearer of the look i l.jpg

‘Woman as image, man as bearer of the look’ I

  • pleasure in looking split between active/male and passive/female

  • women connote ‘to-be-looked-at-ness’

  • the visual presence of women ‘works against the development of a story-line, freezes the flow of action in moments of erotic contemplation’


Woman as image man as bearer of the look ii l.jpg

‘Woman as image, man as bearer of the look’ II

  • the woman functions as both erotic object for the characters within the screen story and erotic object for the spectator within the auditorium (object of fantasy)

  • the spectator is led to identify with the main male protagonist

  • ‘the power of the male protagonist as he controls events coincides with the active power of the erotic look’


Fetishistic scopophilia l.jpg

Fetishistic scopophilia

  • the image of the woman also carries a threat

  • there are two avenues of escape from fear of femininity for the male spectator

    • investigate the woman, demystify her mystery

    • disavow (deny) castration by turning the woman into a reassuring fetish. The image of the woman > overvalued: this is the cult of the (beautiful) female star, e.g. Jeanne Moreau for nouvelle vague


The male gaze and fetishistic scopophilia in jules et jim l.jpg

The male gaze and fetishistic scopophilia in ‘Jules et Jim’

  • scopophilia is the force driving the movements and positioning of the camera

  • the gaze is male, and the spectator is led to identify with this male gaze

  • the cinematic apparatus is not gender-neutral (in later readings, camera can also register differences of sexuality)


  • Login