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Unit Two Friday Evening or Not. Procedure and the Main Teaching Points LANGUAGE STRUCTURE PRACTICE

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unit two friday evening or not
Unit Two Friday Evening or Not

Procedure and the Main Teaching Points

LANGUAGE STRUCTURE PRACTICE

  • 1. Have the students listen to the tape recording of the complete dialogues with their books shut and say after each of them at least twice. Then fill in the blank space in Student’s Book (SB) with the exact words they hear from the tape.
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2. Discuss the key language points and structures:

The nominal clauses used as

1). the subject complement introduced by that,

2). the subject complement introduced by a wh- word,

3). the appositive,

4). the subject introduced by what.

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3. Do substitution practice according to the pattern of the examples in SB by making

full uses of the given cues.

  • 4. Prompt the students to form dialogues of their own, which are different from the given patterns but are still based on the given cues.
dialogue i friday evening or not
DIALOGUE I Friday Evening or Not
  • 1. Play the tape recording of the dialogue once or twice and ask the students to listen to it intently.
  • 2. Ask the students some questions on their comprehension:

1). What do students usually do on Friday evenings?

2). What do you usually do on Friday evenings?

3). What are stand-ins in a play?

4). What will happen if a performance is a flop? What is the best way to avoid it?

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3. Discuss and practise the following language points and structures:

put on a play; adapted from; under the principle of “one country, two systems”; resume sovereignty over…; enjoy a high degree of autonomy; stage a performance; count someone in; come out all right; etc.

  • 4. Have the students read the dialogue aloud in pairs with feeling and expression.
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5. Have the students retell the content of the dialogue.

Outline for retelling:

A invites B to play a role in an English play. A explains what the play is about and proposes to have a rehearsal every Friday evening.

B objects to the proposal, citing many reasons.

A tells B what has been done to ensure successful rehearsals.

B accepts the proposal willingly.

  • 6. Do role-play with the similar patterns and expressions:

Ask the students to do role-play in pairs first and then act out the dialogue in front of their classmates.

what will you be doing tomorrow
What Will You Be Doing Tomorrow
  • Role 1: You are Ada. You are now an architect. This is what you’ll be doing tomorrow.

9:00 – 11:00 a.m. draw the plan of the city recreation centre

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. have a conference

1:30 – 5:30 p.m. visit a worksite

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Role 2: You are Bob. You are now a bank clerk. This is what you’ll be doing tomorrow.

9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. attend on clients and keep accounts 1:30 – 5:30 p.m. attend on clients and keep accounts

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Role 3: You are Paul. You are now a postman. This is what you’ll be doing tomorrow.
  • 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. deliver letters to homes and offices
  • 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. collect letters from pillar-boxes
  • 1:30 – 5:30 p.m. collect letters from pillar-boxes
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Role 4: You are Peggy. You are now a telephone operator. This is what you’ll be doing tomorrow.
  • 9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. work at the switchboard
  • 1:30 – 5:30 p.m. work at the switchboard
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Role 5: You are Steve. You are now a junior surgeon. This is what you’ll be doing tomorrow.
  • 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. make your rounds of the wards
  • 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. do a minor operation
  • 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. make your rounds of the wards
  • 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. have a conference
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Role 6: You are Susan. You are a school teacher. This is what you’ll be doing tomorrow.
  • 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. teach algebra
  • 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. correct exercises
  • 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. teach geometry
  • 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. correct exercises
dialogue ii invitations
DIALOGUE II Invitations
  • 1. Play the tape recording of the dialogue once or twice and ask the students to listen to it intently.
  • 2. Ask the students some questions on their comprehension.
  • 3. Have the students read the dialogue aloud in pairs with feeling and expression.
  • 4. Discuss how to make and respond to invitations appropriately in various communicative situations.
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5. Introduce to the students the etiquette of invitations in the English-speaking countries.
  • 6. Have the students make dialogues using the situations on Student’s Book.

Sample Dialogues:

Practice 1

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A: Do you feel like going to a football match next weekend?
  • B: That sounds like a good idea, but where is it exactly?
  • A: It’s in the middle of the town, in the new sports stadium.
  • B: That sounds marvelous, but when?
  • A: On Saturday afternoon, I think, 3 o’clock.
  • B: What a pity, I’m afraid Saturday afternoon’s a bit difficult. What about another day?
  • A: I think they are playing on Sunday night too. Is that all right?
  • B: Yes, fine. I look forward to it.
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Practice 2
  • A: Would you like to go away somewhere on May 1st?
  • B: Oh yes, that would be nice, but I’ve already arranged to go somewhere else with
  • my sister.
  • A: Oh, I see.
  • B: We’re going to the coast by bus. Do you feel like coming with us?
  • A: It’s nice of you to ask, but I don’t think I can. You see my two brothers are coming
  • to visit me then.
  • B: That’s no problem. How about inviting them along too?
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Practice 3
  • A: I was wondering if you felt like going cycling on Sunday.
  • B: Unfortunately, I can’t on Sunday. Can you make it another day?
  • A: What about Tuesday?
  • B: Oh no, Tuesday’s impossible, I’m afraid. I really must do some work then; I have an exam on Wednesday. But another time perhaps.
  • A: Okay, perhaps the following weekend. Let’s wait and see.
reading i stunts in the cinema
READING I Stunts in the Cinema
  • 1. Have the students read the passage quickly and do the comprehension exercises in the Workbook.
  • 2. Ask the students some questions on their comprehension:

1). Who are stuntmen and what do they do?

2). How are action scenes made in films?

3). What has to be done to make stunts look real on the screen?

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4). How many kinds of stunts are mentioned in this passage?

5). In which order do you think the author organizes these different kinds of stunts?

6). What measures have to be taken to protect the life of a stuntman?

7). What types of stunts have been forbidden in today’s film production?

8). After reading this passage, do you think making stunts in films is a complicated job? What is involved?

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3. Discuss and practise the following language points and structures:
  • work out; mime; sound as if…; tumble; set off; be loaded with; tricks; delay; make sure; bounce up; all-rounder; expert; etc.
  • 4. Discuss the structure, genre features and writing techniques of the passage.
  • 5. Have the students read the passage aloud with feeling and expression.
  • 6. Have the students retell the main idea of the passage.
reading ii soap opera
READING II Soap Opera
  • 1. Have the students read the passage quickly and do the comprehension exercises in the Workbook.
  • 2. Ask the students some questions on their comprehension:

1). Why do many people all over the world watch soap operas on television?

2). What differences are there between cheap soap operas and soap operas with big stars and produced at high costs?

3). How many main types of characters are there in soap operas? What are they? Describe each of them.

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3. Discuss and practise the following language points and structures:

prime time; peak time; flash across; start a fashion; hit the headlines; written to a formula; centre on; etc.

  • 4. Have the students write a précis of the passage.
guided writing
GUIDED WRITING

Exercise I & II

  • The aim of Exercise I and II in this section is to help the students to use the common linking words correctly and to write well-organized sentences and paragraphs. Do the exercises in SB orally in class. Let the students discuss, first in small groups and then in larger groups, the alternatives for each blank and decide which word or phrase to choose and how to write sentences and paragraphs smoothly and logically. This enables the students not only to distinguish one connective from another but also to develop logical thinking.
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Exercise III
  • Exercise III aims to help the students to write informal notes of various kinds. In odd-numbered units, a number of scrambled sentences are given for the students to arrange in good order. In even-numbered units, cues are given for the students to construct their own notes after the pattern of the preceding one. Again, classroom discussion is encouraged, so that the students may learn, by finding out for themselves, how to write an informal note.
reference version
Reference version:

6 June, 2005

Dear Mary and John,

We have just moved to a suburban district in southwestern Shanghai. Now that everything is more or less orderly again, we are going to have a house-warming party this coming Saturday afternoon, 11 June.

We want you to see for yourself that living in the country is not so terrible after all, what with the fresh air, clear sky and, above all, the subway that can take us to the city proper almost in no time.

We will have a good time on Saturday, we are sure. Many old friends are coming, too. Give us a ring to say that you are coming.

Yours,

Jill and Jack

interaction activities
INTERACTION ACTIVITIES
  • This section provides the students with opportunities to talk about their own experiences and express their opinions freely in English. Though the topics and the language structures are often related to each other in one way or another, the students should be encouraged to talk without reserve, making full use of their knowledge of English they have acquired up to this point. Errors should be tolerated when interaction is going on, but an assessment of the students’ performance will be made at the end of the practice.
  • Topic: A friend in need is a friend indeed.
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Questions for discussion:
  • An English proverb goes, “A friend in need is a friend indeed.” It means that a person who helps you when you really need help is your true friend. Have you ever been in urgent need of someone’s help? Did anyone come to your help? What actually happened? Who was this true friend of yours? Perhaps you never have been in need of any form of help. But you must have heard about someone who has a genuine friend. What happened to the two friends? How did one of them help the other? Try to recall either your own experience or someone else’s experience and fill in the following box with a brief account of the experience.
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