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Teacher Quality & Title I Paraprofessional Qualifications. Highly Qualified Teachers. Title I, Part A Section 1119. When? Who?. End of SY 2005-2006 —All teachers in core academic subject areas When Hired—Title I, Part A Teachers

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Teacher Quality &Title I Paraprofessional Qualifications


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Highly Qualified Teachers

Title I, Part A

Section 1119


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When? Who?

  • End of SY 2005-2006—All teachers in core academic subject areas

  • When Hired—Title I, Part A Teachers

    • Schoolwide Campus: All teachers in core academic subject areas

    • Targeted Assistance Campus: All teachers whose salary is paid in whole or in part with Title I, Part A funds


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Highly QualifiedCore Academic Subject Areas

  • English

  • Reading/Language Arts

  • Mathematics

  • Science

  • Foreign Languages

  • Civics and Government

  • Economics

  • History

  • Geography

  • Arts


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NCLB Highly Qualified vs.State Certification Structure

  • The NCLB definition of “highly qualified” does not completely align to the current state certification structure and assignment rules.

  • Teachers who are allowed to teach certain courses under state certification and assignment rules may not meet the definition of “highly qualified.”

  • Teachers who do meet the definition of “highly qualified” may require a permit under the current state certification structure.


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Highly Qualified

A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has—

  • Full State Certification, and


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Highly Qualified

A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has—

  • Full State Certification, and

A person who holds a valid Texas standard teacher’s certificate or lifetime teacher’s certificate has full state certification.


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Highly Qualified

A person who holds a valid Texas standard teacher’s certificate or lifetime teacher’s certificate has full state certification.

A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has—

  • Full State Certification, and

Also, a degreed individual who holds a probationary certificate, has demonstrated content mastery, and is participating in an acceptable alternate route to certification program may be considered “fully certified” under the “highly qualified” requirements.


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Highly Qualified

A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has—

  • Full State Certification, and

  • Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and


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Highly Qualified

A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has—

  • Full State Certification, and

  • Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and

  • Demonstrated Competency


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Highly Qualified

New Elementary Teacher—

Passing the Elementary Comprehensive Examination for Certification of Educators in Texas (ExCET) or the grade-level appropriate Texas Examination of Educator Standards (TExES).

A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has—

  • Full State Certification, and

  • Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and

  • Demonstrated Competency


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Highly Qualified

  • Existing Elementary Teacher—

  • Passing either ExCET or TExES , or

  • Meeting the requirements established under the High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation for elementary teachers.

A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has—

  • Full State Certification, and

  • Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and

  • Demonstrated Competency


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Highly Qualified

  • New Secondary Teacher—

  • Passing the applicable ExCET/TExES content exam for a certification area appropriate to the teaching assignment, or

  • Having an academic major or graduate degree or the coursework equivalent to an undergraduate academic major in the core academic subject area taught [i.e., 24 semester hours, with 12 of the hours being upper-division (junior- or senior-level) courses in the core academic subject area].

A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has—

  • Full State Certification, and

  • Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and

  • Demonstrated Competency


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Highly Qualified

  • Existing Secondary Teacher—

  • Passing the applicable ExCET/TExES, or

  • Having an academic major or graduate degree or the coursework equivalent to an undergraduate academic major in the core academic subject area taught, or

  • Meeting the requirements established under the High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation for secondary teachers.

A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has—

  • Full State Certification, and

  • Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and

  • Demonstrated Competency


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Highly Qualified

A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has—

  • Full State Certification, and

  • Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and

  • Demonstrated Competency


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Demonstrating Competency by ExCET or TExES Exam


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NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher(Core Academic Subject Areas)

All core academic subject teachers must be HQ by end of SY 2005-2006.

Title I, Part A teachers must be HQ when hired.

Bachelor’s Degree

Full State Certification

Demonstrates Subject Competency

Elementary

Secondary


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Elementary

New

Existing

Pass ExCET orTExES

Pass ExCET orTExES

OR

Meet High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation


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New

Pass ExCET orTExES

OR

Secondary

Existing

Pass ExCET orTExES

OR

  • FOR ACADEMIC SUBJECT TAUGHT:

  • Academic Major or

  • Graduate Degree or

  • Coursework (Equivalent to an Undergraduate Major in Subject Area Taught)

  • FOR ACADEMIC SUBJECT TAUGHT:

  • Academic Major or

  • Graduate Degree or

  • Coursework (Equivalent to an Undergraduate Majorin Subject Area Taught)

OR

High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation


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High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation

  • The state has the authority to develop a High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation for existing elementary and secondary teachers.

  • HOUSE is defined in Volume 1, Issue 2 of the NCLB Bulletin.


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HOUSE A for Elementary

Competency is demonstrated by meeting all three of the following criteria:

  • At least one creditable year of teaching experience.

    AND

  • A minimum of 24 points derived from—

    • Experience teaching at the elementary level [ 1 year = 1 point (maximum of 12 points) ];

    • College coursework in English/Language Arts, Math, Science, and/or Social Studies* [ 1 college hour = 1 point ]; and/or

    • Professional development that meets the standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credit established by SBEC rules[ 15 CPE clock hours = 1 point ].


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HOUSE A for Elementary (cont’d)

AND

  • Each of the subjects (English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies*) is represented in the 24 points, whether through experience, college coursework, or professional development.

    [*Note: The social studies requirement may be met through coursework or CPE hours in government, history, economics, geography, or political science.]


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HOUSE B for Elementary

Competency is demonstrated by meeting both of the following criteria:

  • The teacher has at least one creditable year of teaching experience.

    AND

  • The teacher has college coursework equivalent to a college major in the subject to be taught.

Intended for departmentalized elementary classes, music, or art.


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HOUSE for Secondary

Competency is demonstrated by meeting both of the following criteria:

  • At least one creditable year of teaching experience in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field; and

  • A minimum of 24 points (at least 6 of which represent the subject to be taught) derived from—

    • Experience teaching at the secondary level in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field [ 1 year = 1 point (maximum of 12 points) ];

    • College coursework in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field [ 1 college hour = 1 point ]; and/or

    • Professional development in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field that meets the standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credit established by SBEC rules [ 15 CPE clock hours = 1 point ].


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institutes, workshops, seminars, conferences, in-service or staff development

interactive distance learning, video conferencing, or on-line activities or conferences;

Independent study (20% max); including authoring a published work;

Development of curriculum or CPE training materials;

Teaching or presenting a CPE activity, (10% max);

Serving as a mentor educator, (30% max); and

Serving as an assessor under TAC §241.35 relating to the Principal Certificate (10% max).

Professional Development CPE



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PERMITS?

Temporary Credentials?

Waivers?

In general permits, waivers, and other temporary credentials do not meet the federal intent of highly qualified. However, there are exceptions. TEA continues to work with USDE to determine any flexibility available in this area.


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Permits, Temporary Credentials, & WaiversNot in Compliance with “Highly Qualified”

  • Teaching waiver approved by the Commissioner of Education;

  • School District Teaching Permit approved by the Commissioner of Education;


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Permits, Temporary Credentials, & WaiversNot in Compliance with “Highly Qualified”

  • Emergency permits issued by SBEC to uncertified individuals (subject, grade-level, or both) for assignments in the core academic subject areas.

    • Exception: It is possible for an elementary teacher to meet the requirements of a “highly qualified” secondary teacher if the teacher has full state elementary certification and the required coursework (24 semester hours, 12 of which are upper-division) for demonstrating competency in the subject area being taught at the secondary level.


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Permits, Temporary Credentials, & WaiversNot in Compliance with “Highly Qualified”

  • Temporary Classroom Assignment Permit (TCAP) issued by the school district under SBEC rules to teach academic class periods outside of the subject area of certification in grades 6-12 for one year.

    • Exception: It is possible for a teacher under this permit to meet the requirements of “highly qualified” if the teacher has full state certification and the required coursework (24 semester hours, 12 of which are upper-division) for demonstrating competency in the subject area being taught that is outside their area of certification at the middle school or high school levels, as appropriate.


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Permits, Temporary Credentials, & WaiversNot in Compliance with “Highly Qualified”

  • A nonrenewable permit (NRP) issued to a teacher who holds a lifetime certification that is no longer valid in order to allow time to reactivate certification by passing a state-approved examination.

    • Exception: It is possible for a teacher under this permit to meet the requirements of “highly qualified” if the teacher has the required coursework (24 semester hours, 12 of which are upper division) for demonstrating competency at the middle school or high school levels, as appropriate.


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Permits, Temporary Credentials, & WaiversNot in Compliance with “Highly Qualified”

  • A nonrenewable permit (NRP) issued to a first-year teacher who has a baccalaureate degree and has completed all courses required for certification, including student teaching, but has not completed all certification exams.


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Teachers of Limited-English Proficient (LEP) Students

  • Teachers of limited-English proficient (LEP) students must meet the “highly qualified” requirements that apply to elementary teachers or secondary teachers, as appropriate, in addition to holding the required English as a Second Language (ESL) or Bilingual certification.


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Special Education Teachers

  • Special Education teachers will be required to meet the definition of “highly qualified”; however, the USDE plans to issue additional guidance related specifically to the application of the “highly qualified” requirements to Special Education teachers.


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Special Education Teachers

  • Until this additional guidance is received, LEAs should continue to apply their current qualification requirements regarding the hiring of Special Education teachers.


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Teachers Certified Outside of Texas

  • Teachers who are certified in another State meet the requirements of “highly qualified” if they have a valid out-of-state teaching certificate, a Bachelor’s degree, can demonstrate subject area competency, and hold a valid Texas One-Year Certificate.


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Teachers Certified Outside of Texas

  • Prior to or during the validity of the one-year certificate, the teacher must meet the state’s certification testing requirements; otherwise, the teacher will not be considered highly qualified after the One-Year Certificate has expired.


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International Teacher Exchange Programs

  • Teachers who come to teach in Texas schools and who will be employed for no more than three years meet the definition of “highly qualified” if a foreign credential evaluation service verifies that:

    • 1) the degree held is at least equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree offered by an American institution of higher education;

    • 2) the teacher holds valid teaching credentials in his/her country; and

    • 3) the teacher demonstrates competency.


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International Teacher Exchange Programs

  • Further guidance will be provided at a later date concerning certification procedures for international teachers.

  • Pending receipt of this guidance, the LEA should follow its current procedures for hiring international teachers, based on the requirements in the previous slide.


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Elementary DAEPs and AEPs

  • At the elementary school level, teachers who provide instruction in DAEPs or AEPs must meet the same “highly qualified” requirements as all elementary school teachers.


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Secondary DAEPs and AEPs

  • At the middle and high school levels, arrangements could be made for independent study opportunities or distance learning methods, where an off-site teacher of record provides materials and lessons for the student.

  • In such cases, the on-site teacher would not serve as the primary teacher (the teacher of record) but would assist in the teaching and learning.

  • The teacher of record must meet the definition of “highly qualified.”


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Long-Term Substitutes

  • An individual that is hired to substitute for a teacher while the teacher is out sick or on leave is not considered the teacher of record and is not required to meet the requirements of “highly qualified.”


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Long-Term Substitutes

  • However, if an individual is hired to substitute for a teacher who has not been hired, the substitute becomes the teacher of record and must meet the requirements of a “highly qualified” teacher.

  • Parent notification requirements apply.


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Alternative Certification Programs

  • In order to be considered “highly qualified” during their internship, elementary and secondary teachers who are enrolled in an SBEC-approved alternative certification program or post-baccalaureate program must have a bachelor’s degree and have demonstrated competency before being placed in the classroom.


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Implementation

  • The LEA should always place the best-qualified teacher available in the classroom.

  • In addition, each LEA must have a recruitment and retention plan that demonstrates that the LEA has strategies and a timeline for attracting and retaining “highly qualified” staff, with the ultimate goal being that all teachers in the core academic subjects will be “highly qualified” by the end of the 2005-2006 school year.


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Implementation

  • LEAs are advised to make adjustments to teacher assignments and hiring procedures that are prudent and manageable for school year 2003-2004 in order to come into compliance.


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State and LEA Annual Planning and Reporting Requirements

Increase in the percentage of highly qualified teachers for each LEA and campus so that ALL teachers teaching in core academic subject areas are “highly qualified” no later than the end of the 2005-2006 school year.

2002-03—PEIMS/Certification Data

Voluntary LEA Report

2003-04—LEA Report


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State and LEA Annual Planning and Reporting Requirements

Increase in the percentage of teachers receiving professional development in order to become “highly qualified.”

2002-03—LEA Report (eGrants Title I, Part A Evaluation)


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State and LEA Annual Planning and Reporting Requirements

Low-income students and minority students are not taught at higher rates than other student groups by teachers who are not “highly qualified.”

2002-03—PEIMS/Certification Data

Voluntary LEA Report

2003-2004—LEA Report


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Title I Paraprofessional Qualifications

Title I, Part A

Section 1119


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Title I, Part AParaprofessional Qualifications

Any paraprofessional with instructional support duties working in a Title I, Part A program must have a high school diploma or its recognized equivalent.


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Title I, Part AParaprofessional Qualifications

Any paraprofessional with instructional support duties hired after January 8, 2002, and working in a Title I, Part A program must meet one of three criteria in statute when hired.


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The term “instructional support duties” means that the paraprofessional is actively involved in providing direct instruction to students.

Title I, Part AParaprofessional Qualifications

Any paraprofessional with instructional support duties hired after January 8, 2002, and working in a Title I, Part A program must meet one of three criteria in statute when hired.

LEAs should refer to a paraprofessional’s

job description to determine whether the qualification requirements apply.


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Title I, Part AParaprofessional Qualifications

  • 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR


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Title I, Part AParaprofessional Qualifications

  • 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR

For purposes of Title I, Part A in Texas, two years of study at an institution of higher education is defined as completion of 48 semester hours or equivalent trimester hours.


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Title I, Part AParaprofessional Qualifications

Statute does not list any required field of study.

  • 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR

For purposes of Title I, Part A in Texas, two years of study at an institution of higher education is defined as completion of 48 semester hours or equivalent trimester hours.


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Title I, Part AParaprofessional Qualifications

  • 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR

  • Associate’s (or higher) degree; OR


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Title I, Part AParaprofessional Qualifications

  • 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR

  • Associate’s (or higher) degree; OR

Statute does not list any required field of study.


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Title I, Part AParaprofessional Qualifications

  • 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR

  • Associate’s (or higher) degree; OR

  • Meet a rigorous standard of quality and can demonstrate, through a formal state or local academic assessment.


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Title I, Part AParaprofessional Qualifications

  • Knowledge of, and the ability to assist in, instruction of reading, writing, and mathematics; or

  • Knowledge of, and the ability to assist in, instruction of reading readiness, writing readiness, and mathematics readiness, as appropriate.

  • 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR

  • Associate’s (or higher) degree; OR

  • Meet a rigorous standard of quality and can demonstrate, through a formal state or local academic assessment.


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Title I, Part A Paraprofessionals hired after January 8, 2002

  • Any Title I, Part A paraprofessional with instructional support duties in the core academic subject areas hired after January 8, 2002, who does not meet the paraprofessional qualifications, must be provided a rigorous academic assessment as soon as possible.

  • School districts are advised that any newly hired Title I, Part A paraprofessional must meet the paraprofessional qualifications before being hired.


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Title I, Part A 2002Paraprofessional Qualifications

Paraprofessionals with instructional duties hired before January 8, 2002, must satisfy the requirements within 4 years (January 8, 2006).


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Paraprofessional Qualifications 2002

Exceptions:

  • Paraprofessional who is proficient in English and a language other than English who provides services by acting as a translator; or

  • Paraprofessional whose duties consist solely of conducting Title I, Part A parental involvement activities.


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Title I, Part A Paraprofessionals 2002with Instructional Duties in Core Academic Subject Areas

Campus Receives Title I, Part A funds?

No

QualificationsNot Applicable

Yes

Targeted Assistance or Schoolwide Campus?

Targeted Assistance campus: ONLY a paraprofessional withinstructional duties in core academic subject areas whose salary is paid with Title I, Part A funds.

Schoolwide campus: ALLparaprofessionals with instructional duties in core academic subject areas without regard to the source of funding of the position.


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Paraprofessionals hired after January 8, 2002, 2002must meet ONE of these three criteria when hired

Paraprofessionals hired on or before January 8, 2002, must meet ONE of these three criteria by January 8, 2006

Option 1: Two yearsof study at an institution of higher education.

Option 2: An associate’s(or higher) degree.

Option 3: A rigorous standard of quality and can demonstrate through a formal academic assessment, knowledge of, and the ability to assist in, instruction of reading (or reading readiness), writing (or writing readiness), and mathematics (or mathematics readiness), as appropriate.


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Portability of Paraprofessional Qualifications 2002

  • When hiring a Title I, Part A paraprofessional who will have instructional support duties, local policy should determine whether the school district will accept the assessment results from another school district or open-enrollment charter school or require the paraprofessional to take the local assessment used by the hiring campus or school district.

  • For consistency, school districts may want to consider having all campuses within the school district use the same instruments and processes for assessing paraprofessionals.


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State and LEA Annual Planning and Reporting Requirements 2002

Percentage of Title I, Part A paraprofessionals who meet the Section 1119 qualifications.

2002-03—LEA Report (eGrants Title I, Part A Evaluation)


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For additional information, contact the Division of NCLB Program Coordination at [email protected]


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